Free Railroads Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Underground Railroad

    • 1455 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 8 Works Cited

    The Underground Railroad The Underground Railroad was one of the most remarkable protests against slavery in United States history. It was a fight for personal survival, which many slaves lost in trying to attain their freedom. Slaves fought for their own existence in trying to keep with the traditions of their homeland, their homes in which they were so brutally taken away from. In all of this turmoil however they managed to preserve the customs and traditions of their native land. These slaves

    • 1455 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 8 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Railroads in Hamlet

    • 1441 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited

    Railroads in Hamlet Hamlet. By definition, a hamlet is a small, desolate town, with less people than a village. In 1931, the town of Hamlet, North Carolina did not fit this description. It in fact was a bustling town full of varied industry and agricultural projects, as depicted in a newspaper article from the Raleigh News and Observer in 1931. In this article, Hamlet is described as being anything but a small, desolate town, showing its importance mainly being in the railroad industry.

    • 1441 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Railroad Development in America

    • 2381 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited

    Railroads have been around for almost two hundred years. Between 1820 and 1850 the first railroads began to appear and the need for the further development became apparent. America had just gone through an era of canal making; and now with the canals not in total operation, railroads began to thrive and take jobs that would once have gone to the canals. However, it was not easy for the railroad industry to promote their innovative new mode of transportation. With vision and ingenuity, the pioneers

    • 2381 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Underground Railroad in North Carolina

    • 1279 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited

    The Underground Railroad in North Carolina The Underground Railroad was perhaps the most active and dramatic protest action against slavery in United States history and as we look at the Underground Railroad in North Carolina we will focus on the Quakers, Levi Coffin’s early years, and the accounts of escaped slaves from North Carolina. The unique blend of southern slave holder and northern abolitionist influences in the formation of North Carolina served to make the state an important link

    • 1279 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Underground Railroad

    • 631 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 11 Works Cited

    Underground Railroad The Underground Railroad was a network of ways that slaves used to escape to the free-states in the North. The Underground Railroad did not gain that name until around 1830 (Donald - ). There were many conductors, people who helped and housed the escaping slaves, but there are a few that have made records. The Underground Railroad was a big network, but it was not run by one certain organization; instead it was run by several individuals (PBS - ) The Underground Railroad was not

    • 631 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 11 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Freedom—the Underground Railroad Introduction "Many times I have suffered in the cold, in beating rains pouring in torrents from the watery clouds, in the midst of the impetuosity of the whirlwinds and wild tornadoes leading on my company—not to the field of...war...but to the land of impartial freedom, where the bloody lash was not buried in the quivering flesh of a slave...." (7,p.i). Such were the conditions of the Underground Railroad. It was a fictitous railroad but served the same purpose:

    • 2703 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 8 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The First Transcontinental Railroad missing works cited “May God continue the unity of our country as this railroad unites the two great oceans of the world” (Mayer 213). This famous quotation was engraved on the gold spike that connected the two fragments of the first transcontinental railroad. It describes the significance of the railway to the rapidly growing United States. The transcontinental railroad was of tremendous importance to the development of the Union because it opened the western

    • 1072 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Pacific Canadian Railroad

    • 1650 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited

    Canadian Pacific Railway Development This article was about the Canadian Pacific Railway. For over 100 years, the railway has practiced a tonnage based shipping model. Trains were to wait in their yards until there were enough shipments to justify a train journey from one point to another. The result of this method was that very few trains traveled, and that the trains that did travel were never on a regular schedule. This resulted in much inefficiency for the company. Some of the issues were trains

    • 1650 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Underground Railroad "I have heard that so many slaves are escaping into freedom along a route that could not be as certain, slave owners said there must be an Underground Railroad under the Ohio River and on to the North (Demand)." The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses used by 19th-century slaves in the United States in order to escape to the slave free states with the help of some courageous people. Slaves had been reported escaping way before the movement began

    • 960 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Transcontinental Railroad

    • 1297 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited

    century of being an independent nation and was beginning to make the transition from a “home producing” nation to a technological one. The biggest contribution to this major technological advancement was the establishment of the Transcontinental Railroad because it provided a faster way to transport goods, which ultimately boosted the economy and catapulted America to the Super Power it is today. Throughout the beginning of the 19th century, America was still being harassed by her former mother country

    • 1297 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Railroad Engineering Introduction The career of being a railroad engineer is one of the top blue collar jobs for an American who is willing to work. Being a railroad engineer is one of the top positions in the blue collar part of the railroad industry. In the railroad engineering career one can expect specific education and training requirements, generous salary, awesome benefits, and very demanding hours. This is a growing job in many places. Being a railroad engineer means a candidate has to work

    • 807 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    forced many to look to new opportunities in cities and elsewhere. This included the newly expanded west. In the 1880s Kansas had three dominating groups- railroad companies, farmers, and cowboys. All three dealt with individual triumphs and struggles when developing the West and specifically Kansas in the later part of the 19th century. Railroads spent most of the 1880s concerned with previous legislation, farmers worried about land allotment and surviving on the Plains. Cowboys also worried about

    • 3342 Words
    • 7 Pages
    • 10 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Transcontinental railroad could be defined as the most monumental change in America in the 19th century. The railroad played a significant role in westward expansion and on the growth and development of the American economy (Gillon p.653). However, the construction of the transcontinental railroad may not have occurred if not for the generous support of the federal government. The federal government provided land grants and financial subsidies to railroad companies to ensure the construction

    • 686 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Railroad Boom

    • 1300 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Railroad Boom The main reason for the transcontinental railroads to be built was to bring the east and west together. The building of these railroads caused huge economic growth throughout the United States. The railroad created opportunities for everyone across the US. "Railroads were the first big business, the first magnet for the great financial markets, and the first industry to develop a large-scale management bureaucracy. The railroads opened the western half of the nation to economic

    • 1300 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    THE TRANSCONTINENTAL RAILROAD

    • 712 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited

    Transcontinental Railroad, began with the tracks forming from the Central Pacific to the east of Sacramento, where it was completed. The Union Pacific Railroad started building their railroad in 1865, while the Central Pacific Railroad started in 1863. “Congress granted both railroads large tracts of land and millions of dollars in government loans” (The First Transcontinental Railroad 116). The government soon realized that making one huge railroad would take forever, so they made The Pacific Railroad Act.

    • 712 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The History of Railroads

    • 836 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Railroads The first railroads were made in the 1550s, they first started off with wooden tracks with carts on them with a horse or horses pulling (About, inventors). They had the tracks because it was easier to move on the rails instead of the dirt roads. The railroads were called wagonways back in the 1550s (About, inventors). In 1776 the wooden rails were replaced by iron rails and the wooden wheels were replaced with iron wheels to make the railroad more smooth(About, inventors). In 1789 the

    • 836 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    the Union, President Lincoln signed the Pacific Railroad Act allowing the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railroad companies to build a railway and telegraph line between Omaha and California Territory. This act gave the railroads an abundant of land and money for each mile of track laid. In 1863, the Central Pacific Railroad began laying tracks east of Sacramento while the Union Pacific Railroad started at Omaha. In 1866, the Union Pacific Railroad laid 260 miles of track in the plains using mostly

    • 735 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Railroad Essay

    • 866 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Railroads have made better the lives of most citizens in the US. By the 1890s, the United States was becoming an urban nation , railroads were a great way of transport between towns. They were used for the shipping of food, building materials and fuel. The presence of them could bring a territory a lot of opportunities as well as it could change its economy in many ways. Railroads also helped to shape physically the growth of towns and also a lot business grew around focal points in the railroad

    • 866 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Underground Railroad was large group of people who secretly worked together to help slaves escape slavery in the south. Despite the name, the Underground Railroad had nothing to do with actual railroads and was not located underground (www.freedomcenter.org). The Underground Railroad helped move hundreds of slaves to the north each year. It’s estimated that the south lost 100,000 slaves during 1810-1850 (www.pbs.org). The Underground Railroad received its name from two events involving masters

    • 1076 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Underground Railroad was what many slaves used to escape slavery. It was not an actual railroad, although it could easily be compared to one. It was a route, with safe houses and many other hiding spots for the slaves to use. The paths had conductors telling you where to go and people who would drive you to the next safe house. You had to be quick, you had to be strong, and you had to be very courageous. The Underground Railroad led all the way to Canada. There were many people helping the slaves

    • 824 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays