Free Public Awareness Essays and Papers

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    either lobbying the government for improved policies, generating public awareness of the cruise ship pollution issue, or working with the cruise ship industry to implement stronger pollution controls. These actors have responded to the weakness in the oceanic policy regime. Although cruise ship pollution remains a major threat to national and international waters, American NGOs have been successful in generating increased awareness of the issue and have been able encourage policies that will make

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    International Warfare

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    the late Princess Diana with the cause; the awareness efforts of organizations such as Amnesty International to publicize the effects of mines; and, last but not least, the drafting and signing into effect of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction. The resulting media coverage and public awareness has resulted in increased initiatives to ban land mines and public outcry over the effect of landmines on affected

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    Gay Rights

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    actions have had a tremendous effect not only on our group butalso on a vast amount of people in this country. Just twenty yearsago there would have been a much greater opposition to equality for homosexuals. Butas a result of their involvement, public awareness has been raised. This paper aims to deal with specific constitutional arguments, a number of court cases, the opinions of a few Hunter College students we talkedto, and the role that homosexuals play in the media. Challenges have beenmade

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    Neisseria gonorrhoeae

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    or lower tract, pharynx, ophthalmic area, rectum, and bloodstream. During the 1980’s gonorrhea was also referred to as “the clap” when public awareness was quite minimal. This was one of the venereal diseases prostitutes hoped to contract since it resulted in infertility by pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). As documentation, diagnostic testing, and public awareness improved, there has been a decline in incidence reports, however, it is still considered a very common infectious disease. Encounter

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    to success was the foundation of Baldwin’s message (243-246). When reading “My Dungeon Shook: A Letter to my Nephew”, it was clear that Baldwin was not just writing a letter to his nephew but to society by interacting personal thoughts with public awareness. Although Baldwin’s letter was addressed to his nephew, he intended for society as a whole to be affected by it. “This innocent country set you down in a getto in which, in fact, it intended that you should parish”(Baldwin 244). This is an

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    Mass Media

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    even more control, therefor creating more concentration in the media. Are the “media monopolies” doing their job in surveying national and local issues and are they acting in the public interest? The article also analyzes the vastly growing corporate elite who control media, and their ability to censor public awareness. 2. Eli Noam and Robert N. Freeman believe that there is more competition in U.S. media and it is only moderately concentrated. They justify their claim through U.S. Department of

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    Family Violence

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    of animals. As a result of the publicity surrounding Mary Ellen’s case, more than two hundred Societies for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children sprang up around the country, and many states passed laws making child abuse illegal. However, public awareness of the problem wavered over the next eighty years, and child abuse remained a largely unacknowledged fact of life in America. Most communities continued to expect the family itself to deal with the issue; if anyone did intercede on the behalf

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    for Nature (referred to as the World Wildlife Fund-WWF in English speaking countries) and Rainforest Alliance, two international NGOs that are involved with forestry projects in developing countries. The comparison indicates that both increase public awareness through different strategies. The WWF defines overarching goals and finances broad programs and the Rainforest Alliance focuses on industry through certification programs. Though both NGOs have not significantly changed international policy

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    To Dam, or Not To Dam

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    verses the economical benefits. There are many pros and cons for the ecological side of this debate. One pro is that dams help areas that would otherwise be waterless and barren support life. Taken from a pamphlet prepared by the Committee on Public Awareness and Education, “Water is the vital resource to support all forms of life on earth. Unfortunately, it is not evenly distributed over the world by season or location. Some parts of the world are prone to drought making water a scarce and precious

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    Global Problems

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    Global Problems The present global political situation is serious and desperately invites public awareness and concern. Global problems cannot be solved locally; they must be studied locally with an eye towards a mass-movement that would raise awareness of the severity of the problems as well as the absence of viable solutions. A comprehensive view should evolve through critical discussions regarding both problems and possible solutions. The movement must seek to create minimal scientific literacy

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    human trafficking

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    is included in their job descriptions, and are forced into prostitution by traffickers, which is humanly unacceptable and should without a doubt be banned from societies regardless of what kind of profit they may bring to the traffickers and to the public even as a whole. The article does mention trafficking in different manners and types, but I chose to pay bigger attention to the issues regarding prostitution here in Cyprus. As I would like to make a clear emphasis on how this issue relates directly

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    elements more clearly, the effects of bipolar disorder are tragic and often deadly. Often the negative results occur due to a lack of proper diagnosis: some seventy-five percent of bipolar cases go untreated (Spearing). Through proper education and public awareness, this serious disease can be properly diagnosed, treated and possibly cured. Bipolar disorder, as defined by the Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine, is a mood disorder that causes a person to suffer extreme emotional changes and shifts in mood

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    Harnessing the Energy of the Oceans

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    sources of electrical energy that we can draw from the oceans. In her well-organized and researched essay, Wise carefully explains the sources and then discusses both the benefits and drawbacks of each source. In the end, Wise’s paper argues that "public awareness and education concerning the benefits of renewable energy sources need to be increased," and that the oceans can be a valuable resourece "only if we take steps to preserve this natural wonder and use it responsibly." Harnessing the Energy

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    Obesity as a Disease

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    heart disease, and certain type of cancers. An average of 300,000 deaths is associated with obesity and the total economic cost of obesity in U.S. was about $ 117 billion in 2000. As health care professionals it is our responsibility to increase public awareness of health consequences of over weight and obesity. Obesity as a disease: Obesity fits all the definitions of ‘disease’, that is, interruption in bodily function. II.     Position Statement Obesity is a growing health problem and leading cause

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    Marketing Case Study

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    available in the quantities desired to as many consumers as possible. The Promotion Variable: This aspect relates to methods used to inform one or more groups of people about an organisation and its products. Promotion can be aimed at increasing public awareness of an organisation and of new or existing products. It can also be used to educate consumers about product features or to urge people to take an interest in that product. The Price Variable: This aspect of the marketing mix relates to the

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    HIV and AIDS: How Has It Developed?

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    within the last two decades have HIV and AIDS become largely visible in the United States and across the globe. It may appear that there is virtually a void in legislation dealing with HIV and AIDS because of the relatively recent increase in public awareness. Perhaps, though, this lack of legislation should not be surprising considering the fact that almost no other specific illnesses are the target of direct legislation. The rights of patients are often the topic of new laws; however, exact diseases

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    Photovoltaic and passive solar design

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    electrodes. His Discovery was never taken to a commercial level until 1950 when silicon was used in semiconductors. In 1973 there was a oil crises in the U.S. and it created huge public awareness about the limited resource of fossil fuels, and led to the emerging market of solar photovoltaic technologies. This awareness was heightened even more by nuclear accidents like Three Mile Island in 1979. There are many different kinds of PV cells but all cells are made from silicon and have no moving

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    ansel adams

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    to the point that the artist could capture, on paper, the beauty or horrors of their environment. Photography allowed the artist to explore the fourth dimension – time (Sayre, 2000). Ansel Adams as an environmental activist brought a greater public awareness to the art of photography. Ansel Adams grew up in San Francisco where he was born in 1902 and remained an only child. He was interested in the traditional arts of music and painting. Adams also was fascinated with science and even collected insects

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    Violence in Schools

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    teens and they will use them to kill. Prior to the 1990s the general public rarely discussed or were affected by school related violence. It seemed to be expected in certain parts of the country-urban areas- but was never thought to reach to suburban and rural schools. Starting in late 1997, a chain reaction of appalling incidents spread from state to state. Following each tragedy was increased media attention and public awareness to this growing issue. Endless images of weeping parents and children

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    Pingelap: Island of the Colorblind

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    Achromatopsia is characterized by extreme light sensitivity, poor vision, and complete inability to distinguish colors (3). This anomaly is the focus of Oliver Sacks' new book The Island of the Colorblind and its publication has succeeded in raising public awareness about the rare hereditary disease of Achromatopsia. Of the roughly the 3000 people living in Pingelap today, 5% to 10% of them are affected by the disorder and about 30% are carriers (3). All of these people are able to trace their ancestry to

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