Free Psychological trauma Essays and Papers

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Free Psychological trauma Essays and Papers

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    following traumatic psychological exposure (Ehlers, Mayou, & Bryant, 1998). In particular, previous research has suggested that specific thinking styles and patterns preceding trauma predict a greater vulnerability and a poorer long-term prognosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (Dalgleish, 2004). Moreover, the literature has illustrated that adolescents can be predisposed to developing PTSD which develops as a result of either direct or indirect exposure to a trauma. For example, witnessing

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    Statistics do not lie. Many more residential fires occur than most may believe. Based on Helaine Greenberg's statistics, roughly 71 people are killed or injured by residen... ... middle of paper ... ...ne. "A Social Work Perspective of Childhood Trauma After a Residential Fire." Social Work in Education. Vol. 19, Issue 1. (January 1997). Online. EbscoHost. April 2003. Liu, Kate. "World Literature in English: Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea." Online. URL: http://www.eng.fju.edu.tw/worldlit/caribbean/rhys

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    Trauma, abuse, displacement, and feelings of alienation have, and is still plaguing the Aboriginal community. Author Eden Robinson and playwright Constance Lindsay Skinner address the displacement, mistreatment, and abuse the indigenous population has faced, and still faces, in Monkey Beach and Birthright. Both Eden Robinson's novel Monkey Beach, and playwright Constance Lindsay Skinner's Birthright deals with characters who are struggling with trauma and haunted with scars from the past. The authors

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    has caused catastrophic consequences within individuals and the community as a whole. The extent and persistence of suppression inflicted upon the indigenous communities have severely disrupted the culture, which has not only made it susceptible to trauma, but can also trigger other catastrophic symptoms, which then lead to the transmission and intergenerational transmission of such behaviours or maladaptive coping strategies amongst its members. To this day, it is still evident that Aborigines continue

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    the Burma Death Railway. In order to allow the Japanese Imperial Army to transport goods to Burma at a much quicker rate, prisoners faced immense hardships such as forced labour, malnutrition, and serious health concerns that included endless PTSD trauma, and appalling sanitary conditions . Richard Flanagan’s novel “The Narrow Road to the Deep North” depicts the brutality of war, which is characterized by the mental, emotional, and physical suffering

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    Pubmed. Woodward, Steven H. et al. "Decreased Anterior Cingulate Volume in Combat Related PTSD." Society of Biological Psychiatry (2005): 582-587. PsychInfo. Woon, Fu Lye and et al. "Hippocampal volume deficits associated with exposure to psychological trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder in adults: A meta-analysis." Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry (2010): 1181-1188. Psych Info.

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    Misery, trauma, and isolation all have connections to the war time settings in “The Thing in the Forest.” In the short story, A.S. Byatt depicts elements captured from both fairy tale and horror genres in war times. During World War II, the two young girls Penny and Primrose endure the 1940s Blitz together but in different psychological ways. In their childhood, they learn how to use gas masks and carry their belongings in oversized suitcases. Both Penny and Primrose suffer psychologically effects

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    the definition, symptoms, DSM-5 criteria and epidemiology and etiology of Trauma and Stress-Related Disorders. When defining these disorders, it was important for Jo to distinguish between stress and stressors. Sue, Sue, Sue and Sue (2016) define stress as a psychological or physiological response stressor that is internal (p.165). Stressors are defined as the external events that place a demand on us that is psychological or physiological (p.165). These distinctions were important to make known

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    Psychological Effects of Ice Storms and Floods All disasters have numerous psychological effects on both survivors and disaster workers. This is because of the trauma and shock associated with disasters. However, though there are some disasters that cause similar side effects, some people react differently to different disasters. Ice storms and floods lasting for days are both serious disasters which can lead to extreme damage and cause serious psychological effects on survivors and disaster workers

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    What exactly is an eyewitness identification? Well, according to the English dictionary eyewitness identification is a person who actually sees some act, occurrence, or thing and can give a firsthand account of it: Eyewitness identification is also known as Eyewitness ID. With this in mind, everyday people are accused of crimes, whether they are falsely accused or not, people still end of facing time. For example, people can be accused due to someone’s actions being misleading, someone may have

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