Free Psychedelic drug Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
Page 1 of 50 - About 500 essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Psychedelic Drugs (aka Psychedelics) Introduction: Throughout human history people have sought experiences that somehow transcend every day life. Some sort of wisdom that might progress their knowledge of self and of the world that they live in. For some reason they believed that the tangible world just could not be all there is to life. Some believed in a greater force that controlled them, some believed of invisible beings that influenced their lives, some of an actual other world that paralleled

    • 6133 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Psychedelic Drugs Essay

    • 2614 Words
    • 6 Pages

    to continuing research being the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) schedule of psychedelic drugs, lack of funding, common misconceptions about the drugs, and a history of abuse and irresponsible users, these drugs actually do hold some merit in their potential use as medication. Psychedelic drugs should be made available to the medical field for testing and prescribing for conditions they are able to treat. This can be done either through rescheduling of the drugs on the DEA controlled substances list

    • 2614 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Psychedelic Drug Use

    • 859 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited

    Psychedelic Drug Use Psychedelic drug use has been associated with the “hippie” culture for decades, but can these substances alter society positively today? Though commonly viewed as an abominable subject in society, hallucinogens are a door to a positive revolution, as studied for suppressants against depression and anxiety, links to a more powerful and spiritual connection, and propose an opportunity for a more open-minded-profitable community. Tobacco destroys the lungs and teeth, alcohol kills

    • 859 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 6 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    today's society is whether or not psychedelic drugs should be legalized for medicinal purposes and if they should, how this legalization would affect the communities in which they’re being prominently medicinally used. Although many scientists have argued that psychedelics pose a mental health risk, closer examination shows that communities would have a significantly lower depression rate if certain psychedelics were legalized. Now to fully understand how psychedelics could be beneficial or the opposite

    • 895 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Psychedelic Drugs

    • 1370 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Psychedelic Drugs and their use to treat mental health can be a controversial topic to many but just like every topic there can be several ways to look at the issue. Before one makes a decision on which drugs they can be bad and harmful, they should first look at every aspect of the drug and understand how they might help people who are struggling with mental issues and disorders. It is important that we look at the positives as well as the negative effects of these type of drugs in order to get

    • 1370 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    Psychedelic drugs affect more then creativity, they are also known to have the ability to increase the users sense of spirituality and religion. In the academic journal, “Voice of The Psychonauts,” author Levente Moro explores the correlation between spirituality, and psychedelic drug use. He claims that when psychedelic drugs are taken in a “supportive” environment they have the ability to induce “deeply meaningful religious revelations and spiritual awakenings” (Moro et al. 190). Psychedelic

    • 2719 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 11 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Best Essays

    Mind Over Matter: Psychedelic Drugs

    • 1178 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited

    Psychedelics have always been a controversial subject in the world of drugs because they have the ability to alter one’s perception of reality. L.S.D, MDMA, and psilocybin are three of the main types of psychedelics on the drug market, all three of which are listed as schedule 1 by the DEA. A schedule 1 drug is considered to have a high addiction risk, has no medical value whatsoever, and is illegal to have in your possession. A schedule 2 drug is considered to have the potential for both medical

    • 1178 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 7 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    compounds DMT and Psilocybin in particular, present the most intriguing responses to study considering they were used ceremonially since the days of the “hunter-gatherer” society. This paper will begin by discussing the historical context of these drugs as they were used by shamans dating back some ten thousand years and how the modified behaviors post consumption served to increased survival rates of the community (Furst 2004, McLenon 2002). Furthermore, during the pioneer studies of Psychology,

    • 774 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    psychotherapeutic uses. Many tests on psilocybin were made at Harvard University in the early 1960’s. However, along with LSD, psilocybin became a scheduled substance in 1970, making it illegal. During this time, psilocybin mushrooms became a part of the psychedelic and hippy movement and were used for recreational and spiritual purposes. Research on psilocybin ended in the late 1980’s because of strict rules imposed by the government but recently scientist have started researching on this chemical once more

    • 1089 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The History of the Psychedelic Movement

    • 4799 Words
    • 10 Pages
    • 16 Works Cited

    The History of the Psychedelic Movement In an attempt to synthesize my own personal academic area of interest, that is: the history of the psychedelic movement in twentieth century America, with the content of the Asian Religions course, I have elected to study the relationship between the influx of Buddhist philosophy and the psychedelic counter-culture movement of the 1960’s and 1970’s. The subject, although highly specific, has nonetheless generated intellectual interest substantial enough

    • 4799 Words
    • 10 Pages
    • 16 Works Cited
    Satisfactory Essays
Previous
Page12345678950