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Free Prisoners Of War Essays and Papers

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    Prisoners of War

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    Prisoners of War The United States angers terrorists and other foreigners on a daily basis, but we find it hard to understand why. Examples abound and most often relate to ignorant decisions on behalf of the government concerning the welfare of these foreigners. The situation on the island of Cuba at the Naval Station of Guantánamo Bay has grown out of hand. Here, the U.S. holds the prisoners that it has captured as part of its war on terrorism in a camp. They hold ver 600 men there without

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    Prisoners of War

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    Prisoners of War What has our society classified as a prisoner of war? A prisoner of war is someone who is a member of regular or irregular armed forces of a nation at war held by the enemy. After two years of war with the Middle East our society wonders what happens to the prisoners in jail. The other conflicts of prisoners of war is how they are treated in jail, also what did they do to be detained as a prisoner of war? In most situations, there is a legitimate reason why these people are

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    Prisoners Of War

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    American Prisoners of War The American military has been engaged in wars from the earliest history of America. The soldiers who have dedicated their lives in support of protecting the country have often found themselves subjected to becoming prisoners or war. Fighting on foreign and domestic soil is a normal practicality of protecting America’s interests and way of life, which has become the example of freedom worldwide. Unfortunately soldiers are captured and held by opposing forces in some of

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    Prisoners of War

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    Throughout history, prisoners of war have been mistreated. In the early history of warfare, there was recognition of a prisoner of war status. The defeated enemy was either killed or enslaved by the victor (Encyclopedia Britannica). During the time of the Aztecs, a prisoner’s negotiation option was to have their heart cut out (Smallwood). Until 1929, no one cared about the treatment of Prisoners of war because there was no greater power to stop the captors from mistreating them. But when the Geneva

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    Prisoners of War in World War II If you have never been a Prisoner of War (POW), you are extremely lucky. The prisoners of war during the World War II, (1939-1945) were treated poorly with no respect or consideration and were given the living conditions worse than animals. It was an extremely bad situation that no human being could survive. They were mistreated, manhandled, beat and even shot defending their country. No one wanted to go to war, but for those men who did, and for

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    Prisoners of War During WWII

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    Wars have essentially been the backbone of history. A war can make or break a country. As the result of war, a country can lose or gain territory and a war directly impacts a countries’ economy. When we learn about wars in schools we usually are taught about when they start, major events/ battles, and when they end. It would take a year or two to cover one war if we were to learn about everything. One thing that is commonly overlooked and we take for granted, is prisoners of war. Most people think

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    Ghost of a Confederate Prisoner of War

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    Ghost of a Confederate Prisoner of War “Home. I want to go home,” the story begins of a Confederate prisoner of war. A friend’s grandmother, age 76 and a worker at the historic society, tells a story of Point Lookout. During the Civil War, the Union had a prison for captured Confederate soldiers near Point Lookout. With a warm and friendly voice that shows the sign of age, the storyteller joyfully recollects the story. She has the tale in book, but recalls it from memory. She knows the

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    How Should Prisoners of War be Treated?

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    How Should Prisoners of War be Treated? In an op-ed piece for the New York Times, entitled "George W. to George W.," Thomas Friedman writes about the treatment of prisoners in United States custody being held in Iraq and Afghanistan. Friedman writes in his "George W." piece that “We killed 26 of our prisoners of war. In 18 cases, people have been recommended for prosecution or action by their supervising agencies, and eight other cases are still under investigation.” Friedman goes on to write

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    helpful or effective method that could be applied. Although the War on Terrorism is different than any war seen before in history, it is still a war against the United States government and the Geneva Convention needs to protect these war criminals. Those suspected of, or convicted of, terroristic offences should receive the same protections under the Geneva Convention that apply to prisoners of war because they are prisoners of war and their basic human rights need to be respected, torture has been

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    The Differences in the Treatment of Prisoners of War by Britain, Germany and Japan Works Cited Not Included According international law a POW is defined as "persons captured by a belligerent while fighting in the military." International law includes "rules on the treatment of prisoners of war but extends protection only to combatants. This excludes civilians who engage in hostilities (by international law they are war criminals) and forces that do not observe conventional requirements

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