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    anthropic principle

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    The Anthropic Principle In the early 1970s, Brandon Carter stated what he called "the anthropic principle": that what we can expect to observe "must be restricted by the conditions necessary for our presence as observers" (Leslie ed. 1990). Carter’s word "anthropic" was intended as applying to intelligent beings in general. The "weak" version of his principle covered the spatiotemporal districts in which observers found themselves, while its "strong" version covered their universes, but the distinction

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    Scientific Principles

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    Scientific Principles Introduction ============ Atoms are very small particles that make up everything including humans, animals and the world around us. An atom is made up of particles, which revolve around a nucleus. The particles are protons, electrons and neutrons. These particles are each in turn different. Protons have a positive charge, electrons have a negative charge while neutrons are neutral and carry no charge. The only similarities, which 2 of the particles have

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    Bernoulli Principle

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    the airfoil and understanding the physics that allow it to lift enormous weights into the sky. All flight is the result of forces acting upon the wings of an airplane that allow it to counteract gravity. Contrary to popular belief, the Bernoulli principle is not responsible for most of the lift generated by an airplanes wings. Rather, the lift is created by air being deflected off the wings and transferring an upward force to those wings. The most important factor in determining the lift generated

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    Principles of Construction Incomplete Work 1) FLUE - The flue is the void or passageway through which the products of combustion are removed from the fire to the outside. 2) CHIMNEY - A chimney is the structure surrounding one or more separate flues. 3) FLUE PIPE - A flue pipe is a single skin metal pipe used to connect a fire or appliance to a chimney. 4) FLUE LINER - The flue liner is the material used to form the flue within the chimney. Flue liners can be of fire clay

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    Principles of Management

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    Goal Setting: A Managers Role vs. the Employee’s Role “How do you get your employees to perform better?” “Are your employees focused, motivated, organized and driven?” “What goals have been established for your employees?” These are a few of the many questions I asked to multiple managers within the company that I work for. Being a relatively new employee, working there for a little over a year, I wanted to ask these questions. Not to see how different managers felt about specific employees,

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    Principles Of Marketing

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    To begin with that I’m from country where hinting a gifts for better own life, for good education, great job, nice house, expensive car is absolutely normal in our society. But I would say that hinting gifts is corruption and nothing other. That’s why I would agree with my sales person recommendation – will offer a new LCD TV as a gift to the sales agent. Therefore it doesn’t mean that I support corruption or will be use it in my future career. I only have an experience and would like to use it in

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    Aristotle on Paideia of Principles

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    Aristotle on Paideia of Principles ABSTRACT: Aristotle maintains that paideia enables one to judge the method used by a given speaker without judging the conclusions drawn as well (I.1 De Partibus Animalium). He contends that this "paideia of principles" requires three things: seeing that principles are not derived from one another; seeing that there is nothing before them within reason; and, seeing that they are the source of much knowledge. In order to grasp these principles, one must respectively

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    Principles for Cognizing the Sacred

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    Principles for Cognizing the Sacred Today we need a scientific analysis of basic world views which expresses genuine understanding of the sacred. Such world views hold the main principles for cognizing reality. A ‘substratum’ understanding of the Sacred is characteristic of mythology and magic, wherein all spiritual phenomena are closely connected with a material or corporeal bearer. Functional understanding of the Sacred is developed by the earliest civilizations in which the spiritual is separated

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    The Principle of Substituted Judgment

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    The Principle of Substituted Judgment Traditionally, the physician was expected to use all of their talents and training in an effort to save the life of their patient, no matter the odds. More recently, the physician’s role has been redefined to preserve the autonomy of the patient. Now physicians must give life saving care only in so far and to the degree desirous of the competent patient. Until this century, it was rare that brain-dead patients could be kept alive for long periods of

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    Principles of Criminal Liability "Law, with all its weaknesses, is all that stands between civilization and barbarism" (John Derbyshire) Criminal Liability is what unlocks the logical structure of the Criminal Law. Each element of a crime that the prosecutor needs to prove (beyond a reasonable doubt) is a principle of criminal liability. There are some crimes that only involve a subset of all the principles of liability, and these are called "crimes of criminal conduct". Burglary, for example

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