Free Prenatal Screening Essays and Papers

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Free Prenatal Screening Essays and Papers

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    Prenatal Screening

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    Prenatal screening Screening for Down syndrome is available to about 53.5% of mothers on a maternal age basis, and the remaining 46.5% of health boards provide serum screening for all ages. There are several methods used in prenatal screening, these are usually used separately, and a number of factors are taken into account to determine which method should be used. Amniocentesis has been around for 20 years and is probably the most well known screening method. It involves testing a sample of the

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    be entirely possible, but law will most likely restrict it. An article written by Frederic Golden helped me draw some understanding on this hot topic. Golden commences his article with a brief story of a mother and father who have been through prenatal testing. They tested for Down syndrome and an inheritable neuromuscular disease. While it was a straightforward procedure that was deemed valid by their doctor, Blue Cross (their insurance provider) refused to pay the bill, even though it was only

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    A Comparison of Parental and Non-Parental Attitudes Towards Prenatal Screening Abstract ======== Prenatal genetic screening has been offered by health authorities in the UK for over twenty years in order to identify those at a higher than average risk of having a child with a disability so that the parents may be offered genetic testing to give more specific information about the health of the foetus and define the risk for future pregnancies. However with the continual advances of

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    method known as prenatal screening to detect the abnormality before birth and prevent this future tragedy to happen. It is screening for the detection of fetal diseases, usually by ultrasound examination or by testing the amniotic fluid obtained by amniocentesis (Williams & Wilkins, 2004). It is available to all pregnant women. Others screening techniques may include maternal serum, placental biopsy, and genetic test. There are several advantages and disadvantages of prenatal screening. There are

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    Gene Manipulation

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    and healthier lives. Gene manipulation is able to screen disorders of the fetus, prevent diseases from occurring to the following generations and allows parents to design their children. Prenatal testing is a very common procedure that is done . Nine out of ten pregnant women submit to some type of prenatal screening. (Golden) Dominant disorders such as Down Syndrome, which is a form of retardation, can be detected from a fetus. Since 1996, gene therapy has been the cure for patients suffering from

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    Human Genetic Screening

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    infections and a high risk of early cancer, and may die in his first months of life (Grace par 10). Do you want to know if your child has the disease? If you do, you will undergo genetic screening, the testing for genetic diseases (Encyclopedia.com). The Technical Aspects of Genetic Screening Genetic screening began in 1934, in Norway, when a mother of two mentally handicapped children told a relative, a chemist, that her children's diapers had an odd smell. The chemist did some testing on the

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    Human Genetic Screening

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    Genetic Screening What is genetic screening? Genetic screening is the testing of cells to check for certain kinds of genes, or for potentially damaging changes to those genes. It may be defined as a systematic search for persons with a particular genotype in a defined population. Genetic screening serves as an important adjunct of modern preventive medicine. The usual approach is to identify persons whose genotype places them or their offspring at risk for genetic diseases. Such screening has the

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    Human Genetic Screening

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    Human Genetic Screening Humans, like all other living organisms, have genes. These genes instruct our bodies to make proteins, these proteins are the molecules that determine the shape and function of each cell. Each gene or set of genes encode for the production of a particular protein.What is a gene ?The term " gene "was created by Wilhelm Johanssen, a Danish botanist in 1911. He was discussing units of inheritance that Mendel called factors.T.H. Morgan's studies on fruit fly genetics led

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    Have you ever wondered what your children will look like? whether they will be boys or girls? or perhaps what your fate may be? Well, someday we may be able to answer all those questions and many more with genetic testing. Scientist are making new discoveries every day in the field of genetics that could possibly change our whole world as we know it. They are presently working on a project called the Human Genome Project, that will map and sequence the human genome. The basic goal of the ambitious

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    Genetic Testing and Screening

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    different techniques involved in gene screening. With the start of the Human Genome Mapping Project some of these techniques have been altered to speed up the screening process. Examples of these techniques include PCR (polymerize chain reaction), RFLP's (restricti... ... middle of paper ... ...WWW: http://www.torontobiotech.org/factsheets/series1_02.htm 2. Encyclopaedia Britannica. Obtained from WWW : http://search.eb.com/bol/search?Dbase=Ar 3. Genetic Screening and Counseling. Obtained from WWW

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