Free Positron emission tomography Essays and Papers

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    Positron-emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging modality which detects gamma rays emitted by a positron-emitting radioactive tracer. The most common tracer used for neuroimaging is 2-deoxy-2 (18F) fluoro-d-glucose (FDG). It approximates for the metabolic processes in the brain providing a broad range of functional and metabolic information to help understand mechanisms of neurologic diseases and guide therapeutic approaches. Most settings have used 2-deoxy-2 (18F) fluoro-d-glucose

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    Principles of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scanning BE908: Biomedical Instrumentation Assignment 2 By Alazar Tesfay Tekie How does PET scan works? Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear imaging technology (molecular imaging) that works in the principle of radio tracer injected into the human body that enables visualization of metabolic processes in the human body. A radio tracer is a radioactive medicine used in conjunction with a natural chemical such as glucose, water, or ammonia

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    survival rate after the surgery is approximately 50% (Tinteren et al. 2002). This means that the risk of unsuccessful surgery is substantial. Computed tomography (CT), traditionally used in preoperative assessment to evaluate the surgery outcomes is not likely to decrease the percentage of lung cancer’s wrong assessment. Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) became the focus of attention, because it has several advantages over CT. Despite this fact, due to some limitations, it does not provide a

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    Radioactive Emissions

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    to combat it? This issue of the human body being opaque and medical conditions within the body being impossible to see is an issue to which science has been applied to devise a variety of solutions. One such solution is positron emission tomography. Positron emission tomography is a medical imaging technology. As an imaging technique it is noninvasive, and among imaging techniques it is unique because it measures and monitors the functions of cells and structures in the body (Freudenrich). PET can

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    Functional Brain Scanning

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    functional brain scanning grew quickly from long-time fantasy to a factual technique that has already showed promise in letting scientists see a brain at work and have some idea of what it is doing. Two functional brain scanning techniques, positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging, have been seized by researchers in tens of thousands of recent brain studies. Although functional brain scanning has remained mostly in the domain of researchers, it has also seen increasing use

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    psychologists and doctors to analyze the human without direct surgery. Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that causes hallucinations, delusions and disorganization in the human brain. Through the many brain imaging technologies, such as position emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the biological factors and behavior of schizophrenia can be discussed and evaluated. In order to outline and evaluate the use of brain imaging in schizophrenia, it is important to be well

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    Nuclear Medicine

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    capable of treating various types of cancer. These abilities make nuclear medicine an invaluable necessity in the medical field. How Science is Applied and How Effective Nuclear Medicine is One example of nuclear science is a PET or positron emission tomography, scan. This scan detects radiation emitted from a radioactive substance that i injected into the body. The isotopes that are usually used for this scan are; Carbon- 11, Fluorine- 18, Oxygen- 15, and Nitrogen- 13 (Freudenrich, 2000) because

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    Nuclear Medicine and Radioactive Isotopes

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    unimelb.edu.au/nucmed/detail/risks.html (Accessed on December 13, 2013). 14. Nuclear Medicine. Kona Community Hospital. http://www.kch.hhsc.org/services/imaging/imaging-nuclear-medicine/default.aspx (Accessed on December 13, 2013). 15. Positron emission tomography (Pet) scan, 2007. MayoClinic.com http://www.riversideonline.com/health_reference/Articles/CA00052.cfm (Accessed on December 13, 2013).

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    cleanliness, or a belief' that certain thoughts are dangerous or unacceptable. Instead, the search for causes now focuses on the interaction neurobiological factors and environmental influences. Brain imaging studies using a technique called positron emission tomography (PET) have compared people with and without OCD. Those with OCD have patterns of brain activity that differ from people with other mental illnesses or people with no mental illness at all. In addition, PET scans show that in patients with

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    Medical Uses of Radiation

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    abnormalities such as breast cancer and use X-ray imaging to do so. They are very useful to doctors and patients alike as they can detect the abnormalities sometimes almost two years before a given patient may notice any changes to their body. Computerised Tomography (CT) scanning is used to recognise causes of abdominal pain and allows doctors to ‘see threw’ sufficient organs. An X-ray of the body is taken and combined with computer generated images to produce a two dimensional picture of the internal body

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    detectors which consist of crystals optically coupled to a photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Scintillators are widely used in the medical radiation fields such as CT scanners, gamma cameras and positron emission tomography (PET) scanners ‎[1]-‎[5]. The scintillation crystal responds to the absorption of gamma ray by the emission of a light pulse. This light pulse is characterized by the special properties of the crystal such as the decay time constant. Then the PMT generates an electrical pulse relative to the

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    The Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease

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    There is not a single test that can identify whether an individual has Alzheimer’s disease. However, the physician can make judgments based on the symptoms an individual experiences to determine whether Alzheimer’s disease is the cause. Through an autopsy, Alzheimer’s disease can be diagnosed fully and more accurately. The physician will need information on the complete medical history of the patient, the list of all the medication the patient is taking, detailed description about

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    Molecular Images

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    Now, with advances in genetic research, the makers of medical imaging equipment are retooling their cameras to spot tiny changes within cells that signal the start of a disease -- the point at which doctors have the best shot at a cure. "It's totally different from the way we take care of patients now," said Dr. Samuel Wickline, professor of medicine, physical and biomedical engineering at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, Missouri. "Molecular imaging will enable you to detect

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    Essay On Radiology

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    Radiologist Radiology is a branch of medical science. It uses x-rays as well as other types of technology to create images of the internal workings of the body. Radiologists use these images, which use a wide variety of imaging technologies, to diagnose and treat diseases. A radiologist’s job is to use radiant energy to create images from which to diagnose patients. As soon as this is done, the radiologist then communicates their findings to the patient’s physician; so a treatment plan can be made

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    Radioisotopes and their Medical Uses

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    A radioisotope is an isotope that emits radiation as it has nuclear instability(Prostate Cancer; Fusion imaging helps target greater doses of radiation).Those who are not too familiar with radioisotopes may think their use is for harmful radiation, nuclear weapons, and the possibility of turning into a giant, raging, green monster. However, there are much more positive uses for radioisotopes. There have been many medical advances thanks to the benefit and practice of radioisotopes in nuclear medicine

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    I Want to Pursuit a Profession in Radiology

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    you find wrong. How the radiology unit works is getting a patient and having the radiologist technician take images of the body by using machines. Different types of machines such as, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET), identify all the images being taken of the human body (Phillip Costello, 2014). After the images have been taken they are sent to the radiologist to be interpreted. After being interpreted the patient is then told their

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    Introduction Computed tomography (CT) and Radionuclide imaging (RNI) are both a form of diagnostic imaging. Since they have been first introduced in medical imaging they both suffered a huge development over the years in terms of image acquisition and also patient radiation protection. The following essay it is going to focus on just a few important things that make CT and RNI similar and different in the same time. However this subject can be discussed in much depth, the focus is going to be on

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    brain imaging technologies, psychologists are able to break down the complexity of the active brain and study its particular processes. Such technologies include Positron Emission Topography (PET), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), Electroencephalogram (EEG), and Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT). These instruments are useful in the field of neurology, but have their own set of benefits and drawbacks depending on different situations. Hence, this essay

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    Carbon 11: Properties and Applications

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    Bibliography 7 Appendice 1 8 CARBON 11 WHAT IS CARBON 11? 11C or more commonly known as Carbon 11 is a radioisotope of Carbon (tracer) which gives off gamma rays. This radioisotope decays to Boron 11 due to beta plus decay or positron emission. Conversely this change can be a result of electron capture but the chance of this happening is minuscule (0.19-0.23% of the time). Carbon 11 has a half-life of 20.34 minutes [1]. The equation of the transformation between 11C and 11B is shown

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    Psychology and Computers

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    Psychology and Computers For this paper I decided on the topic of how computers influence my chosen profession, and since I am a Psychology major this paper is going to be about Psychology and Computers. I plan to study School Psychology in particular. Where to begin? Computers affect so many aspects of Psychology. Let us start with the basic computer which is the calculator. We Psychology major’s use the calculator all the time, particularly in the class of test and measurements, are

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