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    those searching for profit. Massachusetts and Virginia are examples of each. Although settled for different reasons, both colonies were similar in their initial struggles, eventual trade routes, and growing populations. Religious persecution was a main deterrent from remaining in England. Puritans, a religious group aside from the

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    John M. Murrin’s essay Coming to Terms with the Salem Witch Trials helps detail the events of these trials and explains why they might have occurred. The witch trials happened during a “particularly turbulent time in the history of colonial Massachusetts and the early modern atlantic world” (Murrin, 339). Salem came to be in 1629 and less than seventy years later found itself in a mess of witch craft. “The trials were not representative of the overall Puritan experiment, as commonly thought

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    after John Winthrop’s arrival in 1630 often overshadow the earlier colony at Plymouth, many are lead to assume that all settlers acted in similar ways with regard to land use, religion, and law. By analyzing the writings of William Bradford and John Winthrop, one begins to see differing pictures of colonization in New England. William Bradford (1590-1657) was probably the most famous Pilgrim that journeyed to Plymouth. Aboard the Mayflower, his peers chose Bradford as the future governor of the

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    along with many others. North American colonies, up until the mid-1670s, had governed themselves without aid from Europe. Between 1686 and 1688, King James II of England appointed Andros governor of the “super-colony”. New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Plymouth, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and East and West Jersey, made up the super-colony, which was now governed under a sense of absolute authority. Andros was granted the authority to rule without having to answer to an elected

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    Pilgrims Landing on Plymouth Rock

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    The pilgrims landing on Plymouth Rock has had a number of important impacts on America today. Whether the impacts were positive or negative, it was the pilgrims that had taken the journey to the New World and made the present what it is today. Originating from England, the English were Puritans who believed that the Church of England was in need of spiritual purification. Instead of altering the church, the English set off on a voyage to the New World for new opportunities. The pilgrims could start

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    King Philip

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    for this war, like many wars, but it is only probable that it be a result of the many differences between the Native way of life, and the English way. The Wampanoag Indians were a tribe that settled in the area of current day Rhode Island and Massachusetts. It is estimated that the number of tribe members was somewhere over ten thousand before the English arrived and brought along sickness and disease that the Natives were not accustomed to. By around 1675 it is imagined that the Wampanoag population

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    Roger Williams Religion

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    into the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights” (history.com). In conclusion, Roger Williams was a Puritan minister and author during the seventeenth century. He did not agree with ways of the Church of England, so he migrated to Boston Massachusetts. He was then banished, and found the colony of Rhode Island. He passed in 1683 with an unspecified

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    imposed restrictions. Smith’s explorations were in Jamestown, Virginia where as a guide and military officer he assisted the original settlement from meeting an inevitable demise. Bradford’s story unfolds further north, in Plymouth Rock—Plymouth Bay (modern-day Massachusetts), where he established a church community “that was ready to perish in the wilderness” (p.53). Smith and Bradford addressed different audiences for different purposes and for this reason captured their accounts employing dissimilar

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    William Bradford and Thomas Morton

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    In the New World Bradford and Morton were both important men of our history. The stories of both great men give us an insight into the way religion and influence affected Puritan life. William Bradford said he believed, “Plymouth people were the chosen people to live out their last days in the earthly church” (Daly pg 560). Puritan settlers came to the new world seeking a better life and to get away from the rule of the Catholic Church they wanted to become a primitive Baptist church like in the

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    The first English settlements for the New England colony arrived in Plymouth in 1620; they were a group of Pilgrims. After 10 years another group of them was sent from the Massachusetts Bay Company much larger and much diverse group of Puritans launched another Massachusetts settlement. As these settlements expanded the generated new colonies. Puritans who thought that Massachusetts were not religious enough generated the colonies of Connecticut and New Heaven these two then

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