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    Platonic Forms

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    One Example of a Platonic Form other than what the book suggests is the Form of a book. The idea to write this paper on the Form of book came to me while I was sitting in the library perusing the reference books, trying to decide on an answer to question 2. You could say that the answer was staring me right in the face. I believe that the Form of a book exists but I have to agree with Aristotle's idea that the Form is created when the object is created. I also think that Forms are eternal, but from

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    Platonic Paradox

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    To research Plato's paradox in the Meno, we can first consult the definition of what platonism is. Websters defines platonism as "actual things are copies of transcendent ideas and that these ideas are the objects of true knowledge apprehended by reminiscence." For this essay, we will assume that trancendency is- "that which is beyond comprehension", and reminiscence as "past experience". The Meno is a dialogue between Socrates, a scholar and Meno, who eventually became an explorer. For this essay

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    legacy of Plato left its distinctive brand of influence on St. Augustine's beliefs and writings, of this there is no doubt. In Confessions, Augustine himself professed that it was the Platonic books that enabled him to attach himself to his God. However, it is evident that Augustine re-augmented much of the Platonic thoughts and, combining them with the early Christian doctrines, configured the hybrid into what became the foundation of Catholicism. The differences—as well as similarities—that exist

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    The researcher's qualitative research consisted of speaking with platonic friends of the opposite sex in casual random settings. The qualitative research was completely random using friends by chance that had no idea of the experiment. In doing so the researcher realizes that it is unethical, but figured it was the only way to find the real answers to his problem. During the conversation the researcher at one point or another came to ask the same four questions to all of the subjects involved in

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    Runaway Statues: Platonic Lessons on the Limits of an Analogy ABSTRACT: Plato’s best-known distinction between knowledge and opinion occurs in the Meno. The distinction rests on an analogy that compares the acquisition and retention of knowledge to the acquisition and retention of valuable material goods. But Plato saw the limitations of the analogy and took pains to warn against learning the wrong lessons from it. In this paper, I will revisit this familiar analogy with a view to seeing how

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    rationality of such values and ideals. Rawls for instance misrepresents them by putting them in the same category as wants or preferences. Ideals, values, and enlightenments can and should be rationally argued over, in dialogue. The Sophistic and the Platonic Enlightenments The claim to rationality is disputed by two rival enlightenments. They collided in the dispute between Plato’s Socrates and the Sophists. On the one side was a secular, Promethean, in principle a-moral enlightenment in the technology

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    hypothesis about the denotational semantics of Chinese nouns. By this case analysis, the paper aims to contribute to the elucidation of the relation between language and philosophy in this regard. My discussion begins with a puzzle: why the classical Platonic one-many problem in the Western philosophical tradition has not been consciously posed in the Chinese philosophical tradition and why, generally speaking, classical Chinese philosophers seem less interested in debating the relevant ontological issues

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    Psychopathology 2.dichotomy between normal and abnormal C. Viewing within a cultural and social setting D. Based on the diaries of women from 35 families from 1760s to 1880s 1.Represents brood range of women 2.Middle class III.      Sensual and platonic A. Sarah Butler Wister and Jeannie Field Musgrove 1. Met while families vacationed; spent 2 years together at boarding school 2. throughout life wrote to eachother talking of their deep affection and their anguish when apart 3. Marriage brought physical

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    cars wrong? If so, what are they missing? To understand Plato’s claim that democracy is nothing but a stopgap on the way to tyranny one must first understand Plato’s viewpoint. Plato is credited with developing a school of thought called Platonic Idealism. Platonic Idealism is based upon the assumption that the essence of the qualities you predicate to things is eternal. Examples of that are ideas such as justice, piety or equality. While we may not be able to readily define them we all know what they

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    variations. But it must be noticed that both conceptions of Platonic thinking are contradictory and that is reflected in their explanations of Plato’s own philosophical project. To begin with, I will not compare each point of the Hermeneutic and Tubingen School positions. I will explain, so far as I can understand, why the explanation of the Tübingen School is unsatisfactory. (1) These insufficiencies are not related to its deep analysis of the Platonic oral tradition, exactly to its interpretation. (2)

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    augustine

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    seen in Augustine’s teaching. His view of the world is Platonic, there is the outer and the inner world, the lower and the higher, the sensible and the intelligible, and the carnal and the spiritual. To become wise requires a movement of the mind inwards and upwards to God, an opening of the mind to truth which provided the mental vision that has been purified by faith. His theme of the divine in the world and in man is more biblical than Platonic, which allowed him to regard the material world with

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    Sophistry

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    format, as to show what I am trying to say in a refined technique. I will try and add my questions and answers at the end, and I hope, Dr. Coyle, that this is an all right journal entry for our first journals. A. Sophistry… Or, more correctly, the Platonic likeness of sophistry. At 19d-21a, Socrates claims, in attempting to differentiate himself from the sophists to whom he has become incorporated in the Athenian popular perception, that sophists claim to be experts about human superiority and can

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    Being vs Becoming Plato

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    Soul     Interest     Class     Virtue Reason     Knowledge     Philosophers     Wisdom Spirit     Honor     Warriors     Courage Desire     Pleasures     Commoners     Temperance From this desire for wholeness comes the famous Platonic theory of ideas. The world about us is imperfect. It is constantly coming into being and going out of being. It seems impossible that anything, which really is, should be part of such a world. When we look at a beautiful girl, we cannot say that

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    Platonic Justice

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    Platonic Justice Throughout Platos Republic, the subject of platonic justice and its goodness to its self arise and are discussed amongst Plato and his peers. At the beginning of The Republic, Plato asks the fundamental question of what is justice? Looking to define the ideal state of justice, Plato reasons that he must first define justice in theory before he can use justice practically. Platonic Justice is defined as being a harmony between the tripartite soul in which reasons guide the spirit

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    The truth was that Jay Gatsby of West Egg, Long Island, sprang from his platonic conception of himself. He was a son of God-- a phrase which, if it means anything, means just that-- and he must be about His Father's business, the service of a vast, vulgar, and meretricious beauty. So he invented just the sort of Jay Gatsby that a seventeen-year-old boy would be likely to invent, and to this conception he was faithful to the end (99). James Gatz was already "about his Father's business" when he carefully

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    philosophy

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    many things. It could be the freedom to reflect, the ideas behind the force of question such as What is life?, Who is god?, Who am I?, etc. Philosophy could be a persons beliefs. Philosophy dates back a long time. It started with Plato talking about platonic forms, moving onto Socrates who used analogies. Others such as Locke, Rousseau, and Dewey also put our their views of philosophy. To me philosophy is a way of thinking, believing, and understanding. It could begin with learning how to interpret things

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    Plato's Republic

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    In reading the Republic, there is no reason to search for arguments which show that Platonic justice ('inner justice' or 'psychic harmony') entails ordinary justice. The relationship between inner justice and ordinary justice is of no importance in Plato's Republic. We note that Plato tries to argue from the very first book that the true source of normativity lies in knowledge attained by philosophical reason. What is crucial, then, is the relationship between inner justice and acts which brings

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    the principal "subversions," in The Merchant of Venice that modern and postmodern critics have imposed upon on the play.  Without its’ alleged contradictions, the play has a tight formalist structural unity, it focuses on an essentialist Platonic idea, and, resolving all conflicts, it ends in closure. On the topic of Antonio's sadness, Granville picks up a clue that to my knowledge no modern critic has noticed.  In his "methodizing" process, he moved Antonio's play-opening line--"I

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    Jane Austen: Wickham, the modified villain of Pride and Prejudice, has so much charm about him that his sensible and epicurean father-in-law is almost disposed to like him better than his other and more honorable sons.  Miss Austen has a most Platonic inclination to explain any knavishness into folly.  Wickedness in her characters is neither unmixed with goodness, nor is it merely a defect of will; she prefers to exhibit it as a weakness of intelligence, an inability of the commonsense to rule

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    Recollection in Plato's Phaedo and Meno

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    Recollection in Plato's Phaedo and Meno As the earliest philosopher from whom we have written texts, Plato is often misrepresented as merely reproducing Socratic rhetoric. In Meno, one of the first Platonic dialogues, Plato offers his own unique philosophical theory, infused with his mentor's brilliant sophistry. Amidst discussing whether or not virtue can be taught, Meno poses a difficult paradox: How can one be virtuous, or seek virtue, when one cannot know what it is? "How will you aim

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