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    What is Pietism?

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    Pietism arose in the mid sixteen hundred. They tried to complete the Reformation as appose to renouncing it. Two men who significantly contributed to Pietism was, Johann Arndt who believed Christians and especially pastors should live a Godly life style as it says in Colossians 3. The other person who shaped Pietism was, Justinian von Welz who requested the gospel be shared amongst non-Christians and to establish Missions College to train and equip future missionaries. He challenged the church

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    INTRODUCTION Count Nicholas Ludwig von Zinzendorf was a pious nobleman who served in the court for the king of Saxony. Being a generous man, he allowed a small group of Moravian refugees to establish a village on his estate. This village was named Herrnhut, and under Zinzendorf’s leadership became a unique Christian community. Zinzendorf was one of the most influential leaders of the modern Protestant missionary movement. In addition, he was responsible for the rebirth of the Moravian Church, authored

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    John Wesley is one of the most influential men in Christian history, a man known for his rigorous devotion to personal holiness. He not only is the founder of the Methodist Church, but also influenced the Wesleyan Church, the Free Methodist Church and the Nazarene Church, among others. His passion for the nonbelievers led him to travel 250,000 miles, give away over £30,000 and preach over 40,000 times around the globe. Wesley lived his life with vigor, rising each morning at four to prepare for

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    Pia Desideria (Introduction) – What Philip Jacob Spener is trying to accomplish in this work is bring to light the problems that the Evangelical (and specifically) Lutheran Church has and the effects that are imposed on the populous as a result. More importantly, he wishes to propose solutions to help fix or at least alleviate the bleeding, so to speak. Pia Desideria is made up of three major portions. Firstly, Spener lists the variety of shortcomings of the church. These include, but are not

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    In the article, “The Germans as a Chosen People: Old Testament Themes in German Nationalism,” Hartmut Lehmann attempts to show to what extent the Protestant denominations of Germany contributed to the rise of German nationalism. He focuses on religion, theology, and how various Protestant groups developed the idea that major events in Germany were directly influenced by god. This idea of divine intervention among Protestants eventually transformed into the notion that Germans had developed a special

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    provide more prominence to devotional life. And lastly the author claims that this movement advocated for a change in the styles of preaching, from a pleasing rhetoric tone to a life impacting one. Works Cited Sorensen, Aage, B. “On Kings, Pietism and Rent-seeking in Scandinavian Welfare States” Acta Sociologica 41, no 1 (Oct 1998): 419-436.

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    The Secular Lifestyle

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    more radical action and abandoned religious affairs altogether. Some of the new ways that branched out of the religious affairs were Pietism, Romanticism, and various ranges of Deism. As result, the role of the Church was being substantially declined. One of the first ways in which Christians modernized their faiths was by a new philosophy of religion called pietism. These Christians who became "pietistic," believed that it was more important to lead a simple Christ-like life, than to insist on

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    Growing out of the romantic movement of the 19th century, there were many factors and various groups that contributed to the rise of German nationalism. With the nation fragmented, and Europe in social turmoil, the German people were lusting for spiritual and emotional unity that Enlightenment thinking could not provide. The population turned to existing religious groups, romantic thinkers, and secular political religions to fill the emotional gap that existed in a modernizing Europe. In the article

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    maker, and his mother was known for her character and natural intelligence. Kant’s family lived modestly, and was active in the Pietism branch of the Lutheran Church. Kant’s pastor made it possible for him to receive an education, by admitting him to the Pietism School at the age of eight. Here Kant studied Latin and theology until he was sixteen. (3) Following the Pietism School, Kant enrolled at the University of Konigsberg as a theology student; however, his true passions lied

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    The Life of Friedrich Engels

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    Dr. Clausen’s class. He began writing articles, Letters from Wuppertal, in a Hamburg newspaper using an alias to obscure his identity from his strict father. Many of his compositions were based on his negativity towards his father’s religion, Pietism, which was a regenerated version of Lutheranism and focused on more dedication to the faith. Others were centered on the barbaric ways he felt people were being treated. Although Engels’ desire was to study law at a university, his father insisted

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