Free Philosophy of artificial intelligence Essays and Papers

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Free Philosophy of artificial intelligence Essays and Papers

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    Turing, Searle, and Artificial Intelligence

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    year old boy, whose mother is questioning the appropriateness of punishing him for his behavior. We cannot answer the mother's question without speculating as to what A.M. Turing and John Searle, two 20th century philosophers whose views on artificial intelligence are starkly contrasting, would say about this predicament. Furthermore, we must provide fair and balanced consideration for both theorists’ viewpoints because, ultimately, neither side can be “correct” in this scenario. But before we compare

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    Can Computers Think?

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    which could be classified that it is thinking. Watson played against human... ... middle of paper ... ..., David, "The Chinese Room Argument", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2009 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = . Oppy, Graham and Dowe, David, "The Turing Test", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Spring 2011 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = . Oren, Mike. Technology Can Byte My Arse. 2004. Article. URL = . Searle, John. “Minds, Brains, and Programs,” in

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    what they comprehend and that what computers do does not explain human understanding. The question of “Do computers have the ability to think?” is a very conflicting argument that causes a lot of debate between philosophers in the study of Artificial Intelligence—a belief that machines can imitate human performance— and philosophers in the Study of Mind, who study the correlation between the mind and the physical world. Searle concludes that a computer cannot simply understand a language just by applying

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    William Lycan's response as a functionalist seems to be one of the most interesting responses to Searle's paper.   However, it also appears to be one of the most empty.  Lycan's reaction as a functionalist appears to be very similar to the systems reply.  In response to Searle's paper, both the systems reply and Lycan's functionalist response claim that while the individual person locked in the room does not understand the story, the system as a whole does understand the story.  Lycan basically writes

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    Introduction The object of this essay is to depict as to whether or not artificial intelligence (A.I.) is possible from the use of arguments by Alan Turing, John Searle, and Jerry Fodor. To accomplish the task at hand; I shall firstly, describe the Turing Test and explain how it works, secondly, describe Functionalism and to detail on how it allows for future A.I. Thirdly, I will describe and explain Searle’s argument and example of the “Chinese room”, and finally I shall describe and explain a

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    Theology and Social Practice

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    (1980). Minds, Brains, and Programs. Behaviour and Brain Sciences, 3(3), 417–424. Sheldrake, P. (2010). Explorations in spirituality: history, theology, and social practice. New York: Paulist Press. Turing, A. M. (1950). Computing Machinery and Intelligence. Mind, 59(236), 433–460. Van Leeuwen, T. (2005). Introducing social semiotics: An introductory textbook. London; New York: Routledge. Von Neumann, J., & Morgenstern, O. (2007). Theory of Games and Economic Behavior (Commemorative Edition). Princeton:

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    The Chinese Room Argument

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    John Searle formulated the Chinese Room Argument in the early 80’s as an attempt to prove that computers are not cognitive operating systems. In short though the immergence of artificial and computational systems has rapidly increased the infinite possibility of knowledge, Searle uses the Chinese room argument to shown that computers are not cognitively independent. John Searle developed two areas of thought concerning the independent cognition of computers. These ideas included the definition

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    An Alternative Means to Intelligence Through cognitive science, computer science, and psychology there has been an underlying question as to what qualifies for intelligent action. Allen Newell and Herbert A. Simon have proposed that a physical symbol system has the necessary and sufficient means for intelligent action. This is a view shared by many other notable figures from a variety of disciplines. What I would like to do in this essay is present an alternative means to attribute intelligent

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    Turing Test Analysis

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    the machine to a redirection called "imitation game", where three people which comprise of a man, woman and analyst play a preoccupation. The inspector must have the capacity to tell who is the machine and who is the human(computing Machinery and Intelligence, p. 471) Turing happens to weaken the sort of machine that can viable mirror the preoccupation. He battles that simply the progressed machine should have the ability to tackle the grounds that modernized workstation can finish any operation which

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    Individual Understanding I agree with functionalists, specifically the strong Artificial Intelligence (AI) camp, concerning the concept of understanding. While John Searle poses a strong non-functionalist case in his AChinese Room@ argument, I find that his definition of Ato understand@ falls short and hampers his point. I criticize his defense that understanding rests on a standardized knowledge of meaning, but not before outlining the general background of the issue. Functionalists define thought

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