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    The Greek Struggle for Independence

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    On the 25th of March 1821, the Greeks’ fight for independence from the Turks began. After about 8 long years of numerous battles, Greece was able to gain their independence in 1829. Their independence would not have been achievable without the help of their allies, who were mainly the French, Russia, and Great Britain. The philhellenes, or Greece-loving people, in those countries would rally support for Greece, and their revolution was a success because of their support. Greece would not have been

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    paintings presented by Berry were very representative of diversity of subject and style but core values of the Philhellenic movement. Delacroix’s work ‘Episode from the Greek War of Independence’ is very representative of Estafthiadou’s description of Philhellenism drawing on classical antiquity’s heroic prowess. The Greek man sitting astride the horse is foregrounded in the work, dominating over the fallen Turk. His traditional dress is sumptuous and reflects Philhellenistic ideals of the hero as beautiful

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    As the Roman Republic grew and began encompassing more territories and consequently more cultures, Roman society and its religious practices changed. With the rise of philhellenism during the Republic, the religious institutions of the state developed as several gods in the Greek pantheon found parallels in the Romans’. The Romans imported cultural and philosophical beliefs nearly as frequently as they did commercial products and tributes, and the emergence of cults in the Republic became relatively

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    analysis of ancient documentation and scholarly research facilitates his study on Rome’s dichotomous attitude of philhellenism and animosity towards “Hellenization” throughout the last two centuries B.C, and furthermore orchestrates his view that these sentient complexities were a discreet product of Roman nobles’ endeavor for controlling Rome. To commence, Gruen sheds light on Rome’s philhellenism sentiments through their indulgence in Greek athletic contests (Isthmian Games), religious festivals (Eleusinian

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    Perhaps the most influential politician in the Roman Republic, Marcus Porcius Cato, better known as Cato the Elder, was a superb orator and the careful cultivation of his personality gave him significant political clout throughout the 100s BC. Decades before the rise of Gaius Marius and other generals engaging in the political realm, Cato the Elder warned of “Roman warlords” he feared would dominate politics at the expense of the Senate’s power. A conservative and traditionalist, Cato had genuine

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    Courses in modern Greek literature, language, and history are offered for credit in many colleges and universities. Some were initially promoted by members of the Modern Greek Studies Association, founded at Princeton in 1969. Most relate to Greece, of course, but the scholarly study of Greek America has also expanded in recent years. Such systematic study goes back at least to 1911, when Henry Pratt Fairchild published Greek Immigration to the United States. Thomas Burgess followed with Greeks in

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    Hadrian and Nero

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    once similar in their oddity and uniquely different in their portrayal. While both emperors were interested in Greek culture Nero's excesses and patronage of the arts were viewed as emblematic of the decline of the Roman state, while Hadrian's “philhellenism” was viewed as positive adaption of provincial practices. This difference in imperial perception is attributable to both the military and administrative success, or lack thereof, of each emperor but also relative to the time and under what conditions

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    home for his family in the United States was more worthy it. This is the period, which is called `From Hellenism to Americanization' and it's from 1920s-1940s. The final period is from the 1940s to the present, which is named as the `era of Philhellenism'. At this period the Greek immigrants were transformed into an American of Hellenic descent. Having worked hard to achieve a place in the United States, The American Greek felt an awakening need to express himself in new ways, and to press closer

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    Today’s Culture There is no educational, scientific, or artistic endeavor in western culture under which one cannot denote some type of ancient Greek influence. Greek influence and respect is so profound there is actually a name for it known as Philhellenism. To identify the influence Greeks have on our modern society we must first have a brief but comprehensive knowledge of who the Greeks were and how their society evolved into one of the most influential social structures and cultures in the historic

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    "hellenocentric" to describe the essential nature of the Greek influence on the development of modern European culture; his method of interpreting Greek culture rests on an attempt both to reanimate the waning classicism of nineteenth century philhellenism and to challenge the widespread, Nietzschean-inspired "war against the excessive rationalization of modern life," a war that also leads, claims Jaeger, to a carte blanche historiographical dismissal of Greek paideia as excessively rationalistic

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