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    Peyote Information

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    feel good? Peyote is a drug that has had more than just physical use and meaning to people for over 400 years. It is used as a spiritual catalyst by many Native Americans, and is believed by them to cause a direct psychic link to God. People around the country have varying views on peyote use, but who can say that it is bad? If the drug does have bad effects on the body, Native Americans have surely accepted that as a reasonable tradeoff for the spiritual journey peyote brings. So is peyote as a drug

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    Peyote and Native American Culture

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    Peyote and Native American Culture Peyote was originally described in 1560, however it was not until the middle of the nineteenth century that botanists were able to conduct field research and correctly classify the cactus (Anderson, 1980). Field studies have concluded that there are two distinct populations of peyote which represent two species. The first and most common, Lophophora williamsii extends from southern Texas reaching south to the Mexican state of San Luis Potosi. The second and least

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    how Huichols attempt to keep the balance between their and supernatural world. Second is about Deer-Maize-Peyote ... ... middle of paper ... ...ganized, they are convinced they will be blessed with good health and abundant subsistence” (Zingg 2004: xxxvi). Huichols believe they get the experience of making direct connection between “fifth level” and spirit world, after eating the peyote they finish by dancing and singing (Furst 1990: 183). They finish the trip by going back home, expecting to

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    The Power of Symbolism

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    which serves as a vehicle for conception’” (230). Peyote Hunt: The Sacred Journey of the Huichol Indians by Barbara Myerhoff is a very intricate text which involves numerous aspects of symbolism. Myerhoff not only applies a much deeper meaning to deer, maize, and peyote, but she also uses these objects as a representation of divine beings and spirits. The deer, maize, and peyote are very powerful entities but together they form the deer-maize-peyote complex, which is central to the Huichol life. The

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    Hallucinogens

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    the drug to get the same effect that you used to get from a little of the drug. This is dangerous because taking large amounts of the same drug can lead to overdose with severe effects. Mescaline Mescaline is the psychoactive ingredient of the peyote cactus. Ecstasy is the common name used. Some nicknames are E, X, and XTC. Ecstasy is actually a mixture of mescaline and methamphetamine. Ecstasy may give a short-term feeling of euphoria but can result in confusion, depression, paranoia, psychosis

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    world including plant life, animal life, and elements are all personified. Everything is embodied with spirit. Concepts of reality are altered through drug induced states. Mushrooms and peyote are mainly used in rituals that don Juan uses to teach Carlos his way of knowledge: Mescalito, the "spirit" of the peyote plant, indicated to don Juan that Carlos was the "chosen" one, the person to whom don Juan should pass on his knowledge(CLC,87). Don Juan speaks of many different spirits and separate

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    written by Aldous Huxley in 1954 was the first essay of its kind to deal with not only the physical effects of mescaline but also attempted to rationalize the fundamental needs satisfied by the drug by its takers. Mescaline is the active chemical in peyote, a wild cactus that grows in the American Southwest and Northern Mexico. Huxley volunteered to boldly go where few Americans other than chemists, native Americans, and researchers dared to go by ingesting synthesized mescaline in a controlled experiment

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    a revitalization movement known to many as the Native American Church, also known as Peyotism (Editors). The word peyote comes from the Nahuatl name for a cactus, peyotyl.

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    American so choose the book:The Peyote CultLa Barre, Weston. (1969).New York: Schocken Books. This book is a study of the background of the Mexican and American Indian rituals based on the plant that produces profound, but temporary sensory and psychic derangements. Peyote is a spineless cactus (Lophophora williamsii), ingested by people in Mexico and the United States to produce visions. The plant is a light blue-green and bears small pink flower. The crown, called a peyote, or mescal, is cut off, chewed

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    struggle to survive in a country that has discriminated against them and persecuted them for hundreds of years. The tribes in North America just want one thing from the United States government and that is respect: of sacred sites, the sacramental use of peyote, and the use of eagle feathers and plants for cultural practices. The United States stole from the Indians in the past and has never kept promises they made to the Native Americans. The one aspect of the Indian’s lives that has kept them going has

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    well as an opportunity to preserve Native American religion in the face of European forced religious imperialism. An integral part of many Native American rituals, peyote is a small, spineless cactus is often seen as an important medicine in communities which practice peyote worship. Peyote is derived from the Aztec word peyotl, and peyote ceremonies have been found in Native American tribes from Mexico all the way to the Plain Indians of the midwest. It must be taken into account that many Native American

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    drugs’ side effects very similar to natural psychosis. A few of these drugs do not cause hallucinations making the name of this group misleading (Zilney, 2011). Before describing the different types of hallucinogenic drugs, such as LSD, Psilocybin, Peyote, Ecstasy and PCP, one must

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    enigma that is don Juan. Don Juan is a teacher, if you want to call him that, and he teaches Castaneda how to stop the world and how to erase personal history. In reality I really do not think don Juan existed, he was merely a figment of Castaneda's peyote-influenced imagination. When we watch television, or read through magazines, we often see advertisements featuring stars, or celebrities that we respect. Companies use the celebrity's influence on people to get the public to buy their product,

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    Hallucinogenic Plants

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    Hallucinogenic Plants Man has used hallucinogenic plants for thousands of years, probably since he began gathering plants for food. The hallucinogens have continued to receive the attention of civilized man through the ages. Recently, we have gone through a period during which sophisticated Western society has "discovered" hallucinogens, and some sectors of the society have taken up, for some reason or another, the use of such plants. This trend may be destined to continue. It is important

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    Employment division v. Smith, 494 U.S 872

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    two drug rehabilitation counselors for using peyote in a religious ceremony. The two counselors, including Smith, sought unemployment benefits. Possessing peyote is a criminal offense in the State of Oregon. The rehabilitation clinic denied the counselors unemployment on grounds of misconduct. Smith filed suit again the clinic. The Oregon Supreme Court overruled the rehabilitation clinic’s verdict. The court stated that Smith’s religious use of peyote was protected under the First Amendment's freedom

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    Whenever Sweden is discussed in books, the media or in conversation, very rarely is anything said of its psychedelic culture. Yet if one takes a deeper look one will actually find a mycelium of scientists, artists, writers, hippies and freethinkers who were at some point shaped by psychedelics. It is presumable that most people outside of Sweden only think of successful exports such as IKEA, ABBA and Ingmar Bergman when the country is mentioned. However, there is more to Sweden than mass-produced

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    Native American Culture

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    Cedar Chiefs for spiritual purposes. The Cedar Chief also brings peyote (cactus). When a person consumes peyote, they tend to obtain a "happy" sense of well-being and experience hallucinogens. Peyote is consumed as a sacrament because the religion sees Father Peyote as a deity (Titon). A crescent is placed west of the sacred fire and the peyote cactus is placed at the center of the crescent during the Peyote ceremony (Titon). The Peyote ceremony is considered to be a "Spiritualized spiritual Journey"

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    The Ho-Chunk Nation

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    Nation members take part in the Native American Church, otherwise known as NAC to most tribal members. The NAC is a peyote based religion. This religion first came in contact with the tribe during the 1900s. Peyote is a hallucinogen that comes from the flower of a thornless cactus. Members of the NAC believe in the Great Spirit who controls the waterbird and thunderbird spirits. Taking peyote is believed to allow people to communicate with the Great Spirit for guidance and

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    Drug Abuse of Hallucinogens

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    Commonly known Hallucinogen drugs are LSD, also known as acid or mellow yellow; PCP, also known as angel dust, tic tac, super grass, or rocket fuel; Psilocybin also known as “shrooms” or magic mushrooms; DMT; and Peyote. Hallucinogen drugs alter human perception and mood by changing the user’s sense of reality. Effects of hallucinogenic drug abuse are unpredictable and the intensity varies on the dose amount. Common effects of abuse include an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, feelings of

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    for thousands of year. It began with naturally occurring hallucinogens, such as the peyote cactus plant and wild mushrooms. Now there are man made drugs that have the same or more intense affects. These include lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), MDMA (ecstasy), and dextromethorphan (DMX, often found in cough syrup). Within this essay, I will cover the history, production, and affects of hallucinogenic drugs. Peyote, a naturally produced plant, has been used as a hallucinogen since as early as 200

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