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    Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 fundamentally changed the cash welfare system in the United States. It cancelled Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) plan, replacing it with Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). It abolished the entitlement status of welfare, provided states with strong incentives to impose time limits, and tied funding levels to the states’ success in moving welfare recipients into work. It is well known that caseloads

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    Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 versus Deadbeat Dads I chose to review opposing positions on the implementation of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996. The act requires all employers to submit new employee information to a national database to be used by social services to locate individuals who are not paying child support to their eligible children. The Department of Health and Human Services provided

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    Welfare Reform

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    Welfare Reform "The U.S. Congress kicked off welfare reform nationwide last October with the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, heralding a new era in which welfare recipients are required to look for work as a condition of benefits." http://www.detnews.com/1997/newsx/welfare/rules/rules.htm. Originally, the welfare system was created to help poor men, women, and children who are in need of financial and medical assistance. Over the years, welfare has become

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    Personal Reasonability Act

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    who could work should be required to do so (Besharov & Fowler, 1993). President Clinton promised to provide people with education, training, jobs placement assistance’s and child care for two years. His goals were to end welfare as a way of life and make it a path to independence and dignity (Besharov & Fowler, 1993). President Clinton also planned to change the Family Support Act to make it stronger (Besharov & Fowler, 1993). The Family Support Act did not force participants to work; it simply

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    The Texas Welfare System

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    whose mediating institutions of community, church and family are increasingly pushed aside; and most of all to the poor themselves, who are trapped in a system that destroys opportunity for themselves and hope for their children. It is time to implement a workfare approach proposal to fight poverty. It is a program based opportunity,

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    Federal Welfare Reform

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    Federal Welfare Reform: A Critical Perspective Abstract: This project will examine “welfare reform,” which was signified by the signing of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act (PRWOA) in 1996. PRWOA replaced the original welfare act of 1935, titled Aid to Dependent Children (later changed to Aid to Families with Dependent Children), with the program Temporary Assistance to needy Families (TANF). Under PRWOA, TANF was instated as a system of block grants allocated to states

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    Why the Way We Helped, Needed Help

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    welfare.” Considering its location in the Preamble, one might imagine that the Founding Fathers held this idea to a very high standard. While the meaning of the Constitution is constantly debated, the notion of where the government stops providing and personal accountability must be had is the focus of this paper. During the Roosevelt era, America saw the birth of what some call the “welfare state” with the government taking a vastly greater role in providing the general welfare, leading to an ever increasing

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    benefit programs. The Census Bureau recorded by surveys over 101, 716,000 people who worked full time year around in 2011 which only allowed one member of the family to work year round. The system is meant to help low income families, however; they don’t want to be not allowed to grow by becoming more independent and have opportunities to rise above poverty. The quest to change the welfare system is to ensure the welfare and the rights of children, their parents and taxpayers are not ignored. Programs

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    Welfare to Work Programs

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    Societies for years have preached the theory of individual responsibility as the righteous route for it citizens to pursuit. The worth of a society is often based on the monetary network of individuals. Moreover, in the United States this is the norm to focus on individual responsibility. However, every society is faced with the conflict of poverty that requires some type of social welfare policy. Poverty is not a stranger to the United States and therefore it created program such as welfare

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    welfare reform has some very positive effects on people’s lives. The Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program and Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program was founded in the year 1996 (Cozic 47). This exceptional reform forced work requirements for the programs. These requirements which were given to a large amount of people and by the use of agreements it would cut off benefits for people who did not cooperate. The reform also enforced bounds on the reception of benefits. Welfare

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