Free Pequod Essays and Papers

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Free Pequod Essays and Papers

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    The initial ship that the Pequod comes into contact with in Moby-Dick is with a whale ship named “The Goney” (Melville 194). Although the two whaling ships pass by each other in close proximity, the men aboard the Goney, a Nantucket ship named for the Albatross, remain silent until monomaniac Ahab presents the captain with the familiar question “Have ye seen the White Whale?” disregarding any Gam etiquette of a friendly introduction and invitation to board the Pequod. (195). In response to Ahab,

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    Ahab as the Hero of Moby Dick

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    than being linked to societal or birth status. In this way it was possible for Othello as the military leader to be the tragic hero despite being an outsider in the composition of the society. Melville follows this example in Moby-Dick. On board the Pequod, Ahab as the ship's captain assumes the role of king or dictator that gives him the elevated status to fit this traditional view of the hero (Millhauser 76). Melville himself wrote: Men may seem detestable . . . ; men may have mean and meagre faces;

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    Ishmael marvels at this site from the Pequod, and on the second day paints the picture of “Right Whales” mowing through the brit, “leaving behind them endless swaths of blue upon the yellow sea” (Melville, 1851: 305). The meadow‑like appearance of the sea is truly a realistic one, however, the

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    Much of American Gothic literature shares the same theme: evil. Two popular literary works, Moby Dick by Herman Melville and The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne express this universal theme in a different way. In The Scarlet Letter Roger Chillingworth is the sneaky, unknown, and vengeful husband of Hester Prynne. In Moby Dick, Ahab is the mad captain who insists on pursuing Moby Dick, a great white whale who already claimed one of his legs. Captain Ahab is evil because his sole

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    Religion of Moby Dick

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    aboard the Pequod, Paganism and Christianity. There are also many religious analogies to be made with the characters contained within Moby-Dick such as Starbuck and Ishmael. Finally, Moby Dick is viewed as the embodiment of certain sins and draws out the darker sides of human nature. Overall, the religious themes within Moby-Dick reflect the personal experiences and beliefs of Herman Melville. Within Moby-Dick, religion is heavily used as a staple of maintaining relationships aboard the Pequod. Although

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    they least expect it. When the Pequod first sets sail, the introduction to Ahab’s character has been limited to only rumors that have been spread by Captain Bildad, Captain Peleg, and Elijah. Captain Ahab’s character was portrayed as one to feel sorrow for especially after losing his leg during a voyage, but on

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    "monomaniac" fate is juxtaposed with that of Ishmael, that moral ambiguity deepens, leaving the reader with an ultimate unclarity of principle. The final moments of Moby Dick bring the novel to a terse, abrupt climax. The mutual destruction of the Pequod and the White Whale, followed by Ishmael's epilogue occupies approximately half a dozen pages. Despite Melville's previous tendency to methodically detail every aspect of whaling life, he assumes a concise, almost journalistic approach in the

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    Melville’s portrayal of the whaling industry countered these beliefs. He showed that whaling took men of great courage and bravery. The characters aboard the Pequod demonstrated tremendous spirit. Their adventures placed the whaling industry in a very different light. With carefully designed characters, and a well-ordered world on board the Pequod, Moby Dick portray the life of a whaler as clearly noble and anything but common. Queequeg was a vehicle for dispelling one of the myths of 19th century

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    Moby Dick or White Whale

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    Nantucket, the traditional capital of the whaling industry. There they secure work on the Pequod, a savage-looking ship adorned with the bones and teeth of sperm whales. Peleg and Bildad, the Pequod’s Quaker owners, drive a hard bargain in terms of salary. They also mention the ship’s mysterious captain, Ahab, who is still recovering from losing his leg in an encounter with a sperm whale on his last voyage. The Pequod leaves Nantucket on a cold Christmas Day with a crew made up of men from many different

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    Ishmael the narrator and a junior member of the Pequod, he doesn’t play a major role in the events of the novel. Ahab, the Ego maniacal captain of Pequod. He lost his leg to the infamous Moby Dick. He is single-minded in his pursuit of the whale, using a mixture of charisma and terror to persuade his crew to join him. Starbuck, the first mate of the Pequod. Starbuck questions Ahab’s judgment twice. First in private, and then once again in public. Queequeg

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