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    I Was a Willing Participant Toward the end of last semester, I registered for this class mainly for one reason: I had had Emily as a professor before, I liked her class and her teaching style very much, and I wanted to again take a class she was teaching. This was my first opportunity to do so, and I jumped on it. In the bulletin, the class was described as the Graduate Writing Seminar, and through the grapevine, I found out it was not a creative writing class, but instead, a study in critical

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    Participant Observation in Anthropology

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    Participant observation is a method of collecting information and data about a culture and is carried out by the researcher immersing themselves in the culture they observing. The researcher becomes known in the community, getting to know and understand the culture in a more intimate and detailed way than would be possible from any other approach. This is done by observing and participating in the community’s daily activities. The method is so effective because the researcher is able to directly

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    research is a unique aspect of anthropology that aims to answer questions by doing field research. Unobtrusive and participant are the two types of observations and this essay will be looking at the later. Alfred Shultz (1971) describes participant observation as a balancing attempt to make the strange familiar and the familiar strange. This essay will aim at explaining what participant observation is and demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of this method. Then, compare and contrast Els Van

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    Assess the usefulness of participant observation in sociological research. In this short essay I will give a skilled weighed argument of the usefulness and non-usefulness of a participant observation. I will back up the points made during this piece with sociologists I have studied. After, which I will then reach a conclusion where I will justify the argument in depth. Observation means watching behaviour in real-life settings. A covert participant observation is when the subject(s) you’re

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    Participant Retention

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    In this paper, I will summarize the chapter from our text, “Recruitment and Retention of Study Participants” (Cook, 2010) and the article “Developing relationships and retaining participants in a longitudinal study” (Adamson & Chojeta, 2007) compare the two and summarize my findings. In, “Recruitment and Retention of Study Participants” (Cook, 2010) the authors discuss issues concerning study participants in evaluations. The issues include the importance of early planning especially defining the target

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    memorizing objects have been performed, by, for example, asking participants to categorise lists of objects into a meaningful arrangement prior to memorizing it; this technique is called organisation. Participants in one condition, (the experimental group) were presented with 4 groups of words which each consisted of seven words in the form of a list. All of the words in each group were categorised in a meaningful way. Participants in the second condition, (the control group) were presented with

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    community and school experiences, as they stated that there was a lack of empirical data focusing upon pupils who displayed such behaviors. The features of the research design were straightforward and simple: a qualitative analysis with one participant; a structured interview, recorded then later transcribed and analyzed to produce 3 themes; a conclusion which produced findings of Andrew’s experiences as a twice-exceptional student. It is the appropriateness of the methods that were used in this

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    Personal Interest

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    develop the self-confidence to eventually become an excellent student who is an active participant in her class. Because of my experience as a parent, I am very aware of the potential to overlook or mislabel shy students and have found myself extremely conscientious of these children since I began teaching. I want to find ways to help these students develop the confidence to become more active participants in my classroom. I wondered what I could do differently in my classroom to help a shy

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    experiment to do with conformity was carried out by Asch. It involved showing participants a set of two cards. On one of the cards, there was a line, whilst on the other card, there was a three lines, one of which was identical to that on the other card. The experiment proceeded by Asch asking participants to say aloud which line out of the three matched the single line on the other card. He found that when the participants were alone and were asked to decide, they all answered correctly by matching

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    Pretextual Discourses: Constructivism in the works of Spelling 1. Spelling and Derridaist reading "Society is fundamentally meaningless," says Sartre. Many narratives concerning the role of the participant as poet may be discovered. But Foucault uses the term 'constructivism' to denote the futility, and some would say the failure, of dialectic art. The subject is contextualised into a postcapitalist textual theory that includes culture as a paradox. However, Sartre's analysis of constructivism

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