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    I Was a Willing Participant Toward the end of last semester, I registered for this class mainly for one reason: I had had Emily as a professor before, I liked her class and her teaching style very much, and I wanted to again take a class she was teaching. This was my first opportunity to do so, and I jumped on it. In the bulletin, the class was described as the Graduate Writing Seminar, and through the grapevine, I found out it was not a creative writing class, but instead, a study in critical

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    Participant Observation in Anthropology

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    Participant observation is a method of collecting information and data about a culture and is carried out by the researcher immersing themselves in the culture they observing. The researcher becomes known in the community, getting to know and understand the culture in a more intimate and detailed way than would be possible from any other approach. This is done by observing and participating in the community’s daily activities. The method is so effective because the researcher is able to directly

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    research is a unique aspect of anthropology that aims to answer questions by doing field research. Unobtrusive and participant are the two types of observations and this essay will be looking at the later. Alfred Shultz (1971) describes participant observation as a balancing attempt to make the strange familiar and the familiar strange. This essay will aim at explaining what participant observation is and demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of this method. Then, compare and contrast Els Van

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    Assess the usefulness of participant observation in sociological research. In this short essay I will give a skilled weighed argument of the usefulness and non-usefulness of a participant observation. I will back up the points made during this piece with sociologists I have studied. After, which I will then reach a conclusion where I will justify the argument in depth. Observation means watching behaviour in real-life settings. A covert participant observation is when the subject(s) you’re

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    Participant Retention

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    In this paper, I will summarize the chapter from our text, “Recruitment and Retention of Study Participants” (Cook, 2010) and the article “Developing relationships and retaining participants in a longitudinal study” (Adamson & Chojeta, 2007) compare the two and summarize my findings. In, “Recruitment and Retention of Study Participants” (Cook, 2010) the authors discuss issues concerning study participants in evaluations. The issues include the importance of early planning especially defining the target

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    memorizing objects have been performed, by, for example, asking participants to categorise lists of objects into a meaningful arrangement prior to memorizing it; this technique is called organisation. Participants in one condition, (the experimental group) were presented with 4 groups of words which each consisted of seven words in the form of a list. All of the words in each group were categorised in a meaningful way. Participants in the second condition, (the control group) were presented with

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    experiment to do with conformity was carried out by Asch. It involved showing participants a set of two cards. On one of the cards, there was a line, whilst on the other card, there was a three lines, one of which was identical to that on the other card. The experiment proceeded by Asch asking participants to say aloud which line out of the three matched the single line on the other card. He found that when the participants were alone and were asked to decide, they all answered correctly by matching

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    community and school experiences, as they stated that there was a lack of empirical data focusing upon pupils who displayed such behaviors. The features of the research design were straightforward and simple: a qualitative analysis with one participant; a structured interview, recorded then later transcribed and analyzed to produce 3 themes; a conclusion which produced findings of Andrew’s experiences as a twice-exceptional student. It is the appropriateness of the methods that were used in this

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    Personal Interest

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    develop the self-confidence to eventually become an excellent student who is an active participant in her class. Because of my experience as a parent, I am very aware of the potential to overlook or mislabel shy students and have found myself extremely conscientious of these children since I began teaching. I want to find ways to help these students develop the confidence to become more active participants in my classroom. I wondered what I could do differently in my classroom to help a shy

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    Rotation of the letter "R"

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    Kosslyn, Ball, and Reiser (1978) asked participants to scan a mental map after studying a map of an island with several landmarks. They predicted that the further the distance between the landmarks, the longer it would take participants to scan from one to the next, whether using the actual map or a mental image created by intensive study. Their hypothesis was supported by their results. The closer positions took less time to locate on the participant' mental maps than the more distant places

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    Pretextual Discourses: Constructivism in the works of Spelling 1. Spelling and Derridaist reading "Society is fundamentally meaningless," says Sartre. Many narratives concerning the role of the participant as poet may be discovered. But Foucault uses the term 'constructivism' to denote the futility, and some would say the failure, of dialectic art. The subject is contextualised into a postcapitalist textual theory that includes culture as a paradox. However, Sartre's analysis of constructivism

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    is a holistic approach, in order to achieve a complete and comprehensive picture of a social group (Fetterman, 1989). There are two main techniques within ethnography, that is firstly, interviews, and secondly, observational methods of participant and non-participant forms (Goetz and LeCompte, 1984; Hammersley, 1990; Lindsay, 1997; Wainwright, 1997). This discussion aims to analyse ethnography as a method of qualitative research and discuss its usefulness in a research question based around residential

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    predominant concept is the concept of dialectic truth. However, Baudrillard promotes the use of modernism to read and modify class. Many desituationisms concerning the role of the participant as poet exist. If one examines prematerial Marxism, one is faced with a choice: either accept modernism or conclude that the task of the participant is deconstruction, given that prematerial Marxism is invalid. Therefore, the premise of dialectic neocapitalist theory implies that academe is intrinsically a legal fiction

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    The World Consensus GameTM The World Consensus GameTM allows anyone to contribute to the creation of a world consensus on issues that divide people. Participants can look up positions that have been taken on topics that people disagree on and can contribute to the discussion of these topics. Participation is easy to do. Once you identify a question that interests you, a map is provided that shows the positions that have been taken on that question along with definitions of positions. You can

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    Emergence of the Computer and Art

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    Computer and Art Some of the leading and by far most prolific participants involved in the production of art today have no limbs and no eyes. In fact, these participants lack blood, flesh, and other things which are necessary to the determination of a being as human; this is due to the fact that in these participants are neither humans nor beings, they are machines. One might ask how a machine could affect the artworld as a participant in the production or art, how such a machine could participate

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    Sports and Gender

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    regarding gender, gender differences, and beliefs about the appropriateness of participation due to gender (Colley et al., 1987; Csizma, Wittig, & Schurr, 1988; Koivula, 1995; Matteo, 1986). Sports labeled as feminine seem to be those that allow women participants to act in accordance with the stereotyped expectations of femininity (such as being graceful and nonagressive) and that provide for beauty and aesthetic pleasure (based on largely male standards). A sport is labeled as masculine if it involves

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    Moral Sentiments and Determinism

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    the central claims in Strawson’s essay are important and true, it fails to fill the lacuna in the analysis, discussion and proposals of traditional compatibilism. The reasons may be summarized as follows. The web of moral demands, feelings and participant attitudes comprises a set of facts within human social life which must be investigated in order to understand the relation (or lack thereof) between determinism and morality. If the facts themselves fill the gap, then it must be some adequate and

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    changes is that of a created sense of, or feeling of, empathy towards all individuals. In many this feeling is a dominating force that enables communication in an outwardly expressive manner, much different than is normally expressed if the participant were to be in a sober state. As a result, MDMA was slated for use in the medical field by psychologists and psychiatrists who were interested in these qualities as an aid in therapy. With lowered inhibitions and a willingness to express one's

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    sr

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    impress top management but could be perceived by their key employees as unattainable. Such an unrealistic target could discourage rather than motivate the operating unit employees. Targets must be clearly understood. It is critical that bonus participants participate in the setting of bonus targets. Their views and suggestions should be given serious consideration. When their suggestions are rejected or modified, the reasons should be clearly communicated. Misunderstandings concerning the bonus

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    Method

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    Method Participants There were 32 (22 female and 10 male) participants in this word recall experiment. Participants were of traditional and nontraditional college-age. The participants were from various academic majors; however, all participants were currently enrolled in one of three sections of an experimental psychology course. All of the experimental psychology students taking part in this experiment had previously completed a course in general psychology and psychological statistics earning

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