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    Parkinson Disease There exists a group of people who live the final years of their lives in glass boxes. They are perfectly capable of seeing outside, but incapable of reaching out to the world around them. Their emotions can not be shown through facial expression, and as their condition continues, speech also becomes difficult or even impossible. These people are men and women of all races and geographical areas, constituting one percent of the world’s population over 50 years old. Parkinson

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    Parkinsons Disease

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    James Parkinson first discovered Parkinson's Disease in 1817. Parkinson's Disease is a common neurologic disorder for the elderly. It is a disorder of the brain characterized by shaking and difficulty with walking, movement, and coordination. This disease is associated with damage to a part of the brain that controls muscle movement. Parkinson's Disease is a chronic illness that is still being extensively studied. Parkinson's Disease has caused problems for many people in this world and plagued

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    parkinsons disease

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    Parkinson’s Disease and the protective mechanism of the antioxidant Vitamin E Description and Risks Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive movement disorder marked by tremors, rigidity, slow movements (bradykinesia), and postural instability. It is a chronic, progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by decreased production of dopamine, a neurotransmitter. Dopamine is responsible for most of the body’s smooth muscle movements. As a result, motor control

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    Parkinsons Disease Essay

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    Parkinson’s disease patients effect on motor learning Parkinsons disease Learning is defined as, a change in the capability of a person to perform a skill that must be inferred from a relatively permanent improvement in performance as a result of practice of experience (Magill 247). For healthy people to learn a skill, they must show improvement, consistency, stability, persistence, and adaptability. However, for patients with Parkinsons Disease, it is not as simple. Bradykinesia, the slowed ability

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    Wolff-Parkinson White Syndrome

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    Wolff-Parkinson White Syndrome Wolff-Parkinson White syndrome is a heart condition where there is an extra electrical pathway or circuit in the heart. The condition can lead to episodes of rapid heart also known as tachycardia. Wolff-Parkinson White syndrome, also known as WPW, is present at birth. People of all ages, even infants, can experience the symptoms related to WPW. Episodes of tachycardia often occur when people are in their teens or early twenties. Most of the time, a fast heart beat

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    can be a determining factor on one’s health. Though most humans are born with a normal functioning heart, there are many who are diagnosed with abnormalities at birth and even later on in their lives. One of these abnormalities is known as Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome, also known as WPW. WPW is a congenital heart defect in which an extra circuit of nerves or wires exists in the heart creating a separate pathway for its electrical output. This short circuit triggers what is known as paroxysmal supraventricular

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    parkinsons

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    25 July 2000. 1 April 2014 (4) Findley, Leslie. “The Economic Impact of Parkinson’s Disease” elsevier.com 2007. 1 April 2014. (5) Rosenberg, Leon E. Human Genes and Genomes. New York: Elsevier, 2012. Print. 4 April 2014. (6) "Understanding Parkinsons." Parkinson Disease Foundation. N.p., 2014. Web. 6 Apr. 2014. . (7) Gwinn, Katrina. "Genetics and Parkinson's Disease: What Have We Learned?" Parkinson's Disease Foundation. N.p., 2009. Web. 6 Apr. 2014. . (8) Tanner, Caroline M. "Environmental Factors

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    The Neurobiology of Parkinson's Disease

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    somewhat equal in all populations, recent studies have shown that African-Americans and Asians are less likely to exhibit Parkinson's symptoms than those of European descent (PD Web, 1998). It was first formally identified by British physician James Parkinson in 1817 as "The Shaking Palsy", however, it is thought that the disease has been around for thousands of years. Described as early as 5000 B.C. in the Indian Ayurvedic medicinal tradition and in the Nei Jing, the first Chinese medical text 2500 years

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    Parkinson's Disease and Tissue Transplants

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    Parkinsonism, research is also being conducted in conjunction with Alzheimer’s Disease, visual, frontal, and motor cortex lesions, hippocampal lesions, and many others (2,3) There are two current approaches to neural transplantation regarding Parkinson s; adrenal medullary and fetal brain grafts. Both methods suffer from limitations in tissue availability, cellular uniformity, and general applicability. The success of neural transplantation in animal models of Parkinson’s syndrome led to its clinical

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    Parkinson's Disease

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    Parkinson's Disease Parkinson’s Disease (PD), "the shaking palsy" first described by James Parkinson in 1817, is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder which affects in upwards of 1.5 million Americans. The disease begins to occur around age 40 and has incidence with patient age. One survey found that PD may affect 1% of the population over 60. Incidence seems to be more prominent in men, and tends to progress to incapacity and death over one or two decades. Clinical diagnosis of PD is

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