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    John Milton's Life and Writing

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    John Milton's Life and Writing John Milton did not just write poetry. He put his life, his thoughts, into words. Milton began his life in Cheapside, England, because his father’s wealthy family was Roman Catholic and John Milton Sr., Milton’s father, decided to become Protestant, therefore he was disinherited (Muir). However, the Milton family did not remain poor, John Milton Sr. was able to establish a wealthy family once more. He became a scrivener, which is a law writer, and was also a music

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    Satan and Glory

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    Milton’s Paradise Regained tells the story of The Son of God’s temptations by Satan. Milton takes his own version of how he imagines the biblical story. We see the temptations of Christ throughout Paradise Regained amplify in intensity and put spiritual last through Milton’s choice of order. Previously Satan has attempted to tempt The Son of God with food, turning stone to bread, even after fasting for forty days. The Son of God stood his ground and rightfully resisted even though it would not only

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    John Milton's Struggle With Society

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    Though Milton's political, social, and religious views are made stunningly clear through an examination of the large body of evidence he left behind, it remains difficult to comprehend the significance of his major epics, including Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes. While they are undoubtedly significant as reflections on biblical stories, there seems to be a deeper significance that relates directly to Milton's political and religious beliefs. Indeed, it seems clear that Milton

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    Innocence

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    of the major themes in the both books Perelandra and Paradise Lost is innocence. In one story, innocence remains intact and is never lost in all of eternity. The other story takes a different spin and innocence is lost forever. Both stories are based on one decision that effects the fate of the entire races. Innocence is a state that only begins upon the initial creation of a being; consequently, it can only be lost once, never to be regained by man's own doing, or it can remain in place, never

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    Distinguishing Between Bad and Evil John Milton’s works Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained and A Masque Presented at Ludlow Castle all have antagonists that are Milton’s representations of evil. However, when closely examining Satan in Paradise Lost to Paradise Regained it is easily recognizable that Satan’s character has taken a remarkable shift in that he no longer questions his immoral actions just like Comus never questions his actions in A Masque Presented at Ludlow Castle. This close examination

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    The Life and Times of John Milton

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    John Milton lived from 1608 to 1674 and was therefore a major part of the Neoclassical Period. Paradise Lost by John Milton was and still is an extremely controversial piece of literature. I have found that the more controversial and disputed a subject is, the more interesting it is to read about. Christianity is a notoriously touchy subject, so naturally I was pulled towards Paradise Lost. When I began my research on this “lost” treasure, I discovered that the recently blinded Milton focused on

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    The Golden Thread

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    generations by humanity, and the finer details of their ethics are still obscured to even the most intelligent of minds, leaving us to often stay with the few basic tenants that seek to preserve humankind’s further existence. Throughout John Milton’s Paradise Lost we encounter this constant struggle between good and evil, as the enigmatic and eternal Satan—a character who is perhaps the chief hero, and protagonist of the epic poem—wages vain war against God’s tyranny in heaven. Satan, like all angels

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    John Milton

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    Satan, as a character, has been satirized, mocked and made foolish in our modern world. John Milton, however, presents quite a different Satan from the devil-on-your-shoulder image people are used to seeing. In Paradise Lost, Milton draws on the Bible for his source of Satan’s character, thereby creating a horrifyingly corrupt Satan. Despite this portrayal, readers often find themselves sympathizing with Satan’s cause, and his determination, viewing him as a hero for his cause, as evidenced by his

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    Milton and Cavendish: Faithful Realists

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    century, pondered the nature of divine reality, the role of human rationality in understanding God’s master plan, and the means by which that plan is (and should be) grasped by the human race. Both Milton and Cavendish have declared in their works, Paradise Lost and The Blazing World, that reason as a means to arrive at ultimate truth is insufficient; in the end, faith is the only tool with which human beings acquire proper knowledge. After an initial reading of The Blazing World, one would assume Cavendish

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    and Deception in Milton's Paradise Lost "Rhetoric and sophistry testify to the fact that the world in which we live is a world of speech, that the clever man can compose at will in order to trick others." 1 Speech was perhaps the most important medium for Milton.  As a blind poet, his lack of visual faculties was augmented by a renewed importance on auditory paths to enlightenment, especially the communicative.  Therefore, contemplation of dialogue in Paradise Lost becomes an essential

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