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    an important aspect of America's history. In Michelle Hay text, “Popular culture : pan-African dimensions : a survey of scholarship”, she touches upon the spread of ideas and history that ultimately black people around the world seek even when they aren't

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    INTRODUCTION Pan Africanism, the possibility that people group of African plummet have regular interests and ought to be brought together. Generally, Pan-Africanism has frequently taken the state of a political or social movement. There are numerous assortments of Pan-Africanism. In its tightest political indication, Pan-Africanists imagine a bound together African country where all individuals of the African diaspora can live (“Pan Africanism” http://global.brintannica.com, 2016). In more-general

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    Fourth of July

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    The essay “Uses of Diaspora” by the literary theorist Brent Hayes Edwards, critically demonstrates the different usage of the term African diaspora by exposing the historical, cultural, and political aspect of the term. Edwards clearly states his need to “excavate a historical and politicized sense of diaspora” in his own work by “focusing on black cultural politics in the interwar period particularly in the Harlem Renaissance and pre-Negritude Fran cophone activity in France and West Africa”(Edwards

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    Past black leaders will state that society has been waging in opposition to the African community. Though it’s more than a feud, it’s not technically a war, but could definitely be called one. Pan-Africanists would say that there is no hope in humanity for the African people, believing a long upbringing of genocide against the African settlers. The African values, or traditions and cultural practices are being stripped from the African culture. That being said, the shared heritage and experience

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    The Pan-African Movement

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    Pan-Africanism by definition is a movement for the political union of all African nations (Merriam-Webster Dictionary). However, to me Pan Africanism has two meanings. The first meaning is all Africans and African Americans whether in Africa or in the diaspora coming together as brothers and sisters unifying as one. The second meaning is all the African nations coming together as one. The Pan African movement was brought about because the Africans and African Americans in the diaspora were tired

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    In Brent Hayes Edwards essay, “ The Use of Diaspora”, the term “African Diaspora” is critically explored for its intellectual history of the word. Edward’s reason for investigating the “intellectual history of the term” rather than a general history is because the term “is taken up at a particular conjecture in black scholarly discourse to do a particular kind of epistemological work” (Edwards 9). At the beginning of his essay Edwards mentions the problem with the term, in terms of how it is loosely

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    Atlantic

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    In the readings and lecture, we start to get into themes of Nationalism and Anti- Colonialism and Pan Africanism in the Atlantics and how much these ideas contrasted that of colonialism and integration with imperialist powers. The documents has a handful of writers that reject the idea of colonialism and oppression, that Africa was not a backyard for other nations to exploit and that they needed to take actions for all these abuses Africa suffered. Many of these deceptions were involvements of nation

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    Pan Africanism, in its fundamental definition, implores the black population to pursue self-dignity and self-determination in bettering their situation and becoming equal to the majority population; W.E.B. Dubois and Marcus Garvey, while both active Pan-Africanists in theory, have different goals and perspectives on the ways in which the racial problems should be approached. The central differences between Dubois and Garvey lie in their adolescent upbringings, and permeate through adulthood to form

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    In Kevin Gaines’ book, American Africans in Ghana, Gaines combines both African and African American history together unlike others have done in the past. Gaines’ book gives his audience insight on the relationship that many prominent African Americans in the Mid-nineteenth century had with Africa. Gaines tackles many issues that were prevalent during this time period, for instance, he tackles race, class, citizenship, independence and freedom. Gaines does this to change the narrative that existed

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    Atlantic

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    In the readings and lectures we discussed many issues regarding postmodernity and what it was concerning the Black Atlantics, we viewed movies ranging from Africans in Central America through Africa itself. The way we explored how pan Africanism brought light into modernity and how many musicians believed that creating songs that had a meaningful message to the mass, was a way to get everyone aware of issues such as Apartheid or corruption. Several of the artists were/are Bob Marley and Gilberto

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    “HARAMBEE” Let Us All Pull Together

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    As the winds of independence stirred across the vast continent of Africa, men and women began to step forward to lead their various people in the desire of decolonialization; all would be detained—some more than others, some would be vilified and others praised for their contributions to the cause of freedom from the yoke of colonial rule and dictates. Education plays a strategic role in the development of leaders and statesmen—without the additional wisdom and knowledge tempered by events and people

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    Legacy of Kwame Nkrumah

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    "Among diehard African political activists and Pan-Africanists, Nkrumah was and continues to remain a revered hero, committed nationalist and Pan-Africanist deserving of high esteem.” (Biney) Ama Biney is able to summarize what exactly Kwame Nkrumah meant and continues to mean for Africa and its history. It is quite often that Kwame Nkrumah is mentioned in the same breath as the famous Nelson Mandela, but why is Nkrumah not as famous if not more famous? He was in power before Mandela, believed

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    The inception of the Pan-African movement was motivated by colonialism and racism faced by African people living in Europe, West Indies and North America in the nineteenth and twentieth century. Through this, leaders of African states originated this movement to unite people of African descent to fight against racism and colonialism (Schraeder, 2000:126). The Pan-African movement was initiated by significant figures such as William Dubois and Marcus Garvey. The concept of this movement started outside

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    publisher, journalist, entrepreneur, and speaker whose beliefs on African-American identities and rights would later be known as "Garveyism". Unlike previous African American leaders, Garvey encouraged a Pan-African philosophy aimed at advancing a global movement of economic empowerment. Pan-Africanism is a movement where the goal is to unify African people or people living in Africa, into a "one African community.” Some of the important things that Garvey founded were the Universal Negro Improvement

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    Malcolm X and W.E.B. Du Bois both grew up in different era; however, they both equally felt the burden of racism and of “the color line”. They both experienced racism when they were young, during their life, and until their death; furthermore, they knew it would be challenging to change the mindsets of millions of white, but that didn’t stop them from trying. Malcolm X and W.E.B. Du bois realized the inequalities that burdened African Americans, and will be remembered for their life’s work and contributions

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    reliance of the colonized people on the motherland is still very prominent within the independent nations. Although independence brought great joy to the people, problems arose politically, financially and socially. Arguably the biggest advocate for Pan-Africanism during the time period was Kwame Nkrumah. His ability to unite the people of the Gold Coast influenced the Gold Coast to declare independence from Britain in 1957, forming the country of Ghana. Ghana gaining independence had a huge impact on

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    include Land exploitation, labor exploitation and most significantly exploiting the minds and spirits of Africans through inhumane treatment. The disabling affliction imposed upon Africa by the White race was the driving force behind the idea of a Pan-African awareness. The narration at the beginning of the documentary King Leopold’s Ghost best articulates the driving force behind European Colonialism. “Natural resources inspire the most unnatural greed”. Natural resources account for the primary

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    Background: The advancement of mobile telecommunications industry in Africa has been the most successful technology catch-up ever in the continent. For example, mobile penetration increased from 2% in 2000 to 45% 2010 later. According to Ros (1999), the undeveloped telecommunications industry in developing countries during the state-dominated era, mostly prior the year 2000, was not due to lack of demand rather insufficient supply as the state-owned incumbent fixed-line operators concentrated only

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    Kwame Nkrumah History

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    Name: Mostafa Sharaf Teacher's Name: Nadean Course Name – Period: English – G8 Date: March 18,2014 Kwame Nkrumah 's life story Childhood Born in 1909, graduated teachers House in Accra, and worked as a professor until he joined in 1935 at the University of Lincoln in the United States in 1945 at the School of Economics London, UK, and was active in student work his time Education and culture: Teachers enrolled in Accra in 1930, and worked in a primary school education until 1934 and his passion

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    Marcus Garvey

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    "I will help to make them."(Cronon 3) Garvey was also heavily influenced by the West African journalist Casely Hayford's Ethiopia Unbound, and William H. Ferris' The African Aboard. (Thomas) These works caused him to have an interest in the early Pan-African movement. In 1913, Garvey developed an friendship with the Egyptian editor Duse Mohamed Ali, a former actor who had became a journalist and, inspired by the Universal Races Conference held in London in 1911, had founded a monthly magazine

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