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Free Pacific Northwest Essays and Papers

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    From the mid 1840s into the 1900s, the Pacific Northwest transformed from small towns to an urban society. In the beginning, settlers traveled by foot, water, and horse to the Pacific Northwest; then later by wagons, stagecoaches, steamboats and sailing ships to passenger trains. The Pacific Northwest experienced a rapid rate of growth from 1880s to 1890s. In between 1859 to 1890, the Pacific Northwest established its statehood between Oregon, Washington and Idaho. The growth in resources of

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    Deforestation of the Pacific Northwest One of the most controversial areas associated with the global problem of deforestation is the Pacific Northwest of the US. The problem can be broken down into several issues that all tie in together. These include the near extinction of the Northern Spotted Owl, the "business" aspect of logging versus the environmental aspect, and the role of the government in this problem. In 1973, the Endangered Species Act (ESA) was passed. This enabled the Dept

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    Management of Old-growth Forests in the Pacific Northwest When westward expansion brought settlers to the Northwest in the 1800s, they discovered that coniferous trees “forty feet in circumference [that] shot two-hundred feet straight up” flourished in the forests of the Pacific coast (Ervin 55). These early pioneers found the opportunity for economic growth in logging these vast forests of towering trees unlike any they had seen before. Today, the timber industry still remains the backbone

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    The Life of Native Americans in the Pacific Northwest: Then & Now It has been estimated that the population of Native Americans living on or very near reservations in the United States ranges from about 1.1 to 1.3 million, and is distributed across more than 330 Indian nations in America (16). American Indian nations display an incredibly wide variety of social and economic characteristics. Although “American Indian” is identified as a single race category on the US Census, each tribe boasts

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    Native Americans of the Pacific Northwest in the Decade of the World’s Indigenous Populations Introduction On 1 January 1994, the Mayan peoples of Chiapas, Mexico participated in an armed uprising in protest of the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Following a strong trend of harassment, and mistreatment of Mexico’s indigenous populations, the implementation of NAFTA all but abolished the land claims of Mexico’s Indians. The Zapatista uprising, as it has been

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    the first settlers traveled to the Pacific Northwest, people have enjoyed the scenic landscapes full of native plants and animals. The scenic landscapes rely on small ecosystems created by native plants and animals to forge their breathtaking views. However, a battle between native and invasive species has incited. These invasive species are detrimental to the ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest. Such foreign plants and animals often thrive in the Pacific Northwest, but greatly harm the native species

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    Bloody Sunday: The Everett Massacre

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    November 5, 1916 which would be known as “Bloody Sunday.” On November 5, 1916 the Everett Massacre was the culmination of labor trouble which had been brewing for months. It was one of the bloodiest single episodes of labor-related violence in the Pacific Northwest. In 1916, Everett, Washington was facing severe economic difficulty. There was ongoing confrontation between business and commercial interests and labor and labor organizers. The laborer had numbers of organized rallies and speeches on the

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    The Tragedy of the Salmon

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    The Tragedy of the Salmon The United States Pacific Northwest has historically been a significant player in the global fishing industry. However, over the last half-century, the fish population in the area has been declining at an alarming rate. Popular species of fish such as cod and salmon have been particularly susceptible to these decreases. What once was a region flourishing with abundant fish populations, is now in danger of being exploited to the point of extinction of certain species. The

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    view of past Native Americans and show the Indian-white relations of the past. The author also hoped to clear misconceptions and myths about Native Americans, in particular the Nez Perce tribe. The author’s contribution to our understanding of Pacific Northwest history was intended to make us see the vital role Native Americans played in shaping history around this region. Therefore, if it wasn’t for the Native Americans in this region we wouldn’t have much of a human history in this

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    Chief Seattle

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    blame where it belongs, on the U.S. Government who lied, cheated, and stole from the Indians forcing many Indian leaders to surrender not only their tribes but their nation in order to save the lives of their people. Among the Indians of the Pacific Northwest, perhaps the best known may be Chief Seattle. Chief Seattle (more correctly known as Seathl or Sealth) was born sometime between 1786-1790 on Blake Island at the campsite of his ancestors. Blake Island lies south and a little east of Bainbridge

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