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    Macbeth is the driving force behind Macbeth’s downfall Lady Macbeth? The driving force behind Macbeth’s downfall? Certainly not. Macbeth was completely and solely responsible for all the acts of great evil which were to lead to his downfall, and to even suggest the blame can be shifted on his wife is ludicrous. From his very first meeting with the witches, Macbeth’s mind became instantly plagued with thoughts of murder and treachery. The guilty start that Banquo noticed: "Good sir, why do you start

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    In Medea, a play by Euripides, Jason possesses many traits that lead to his downfall. After Medea assists Jason in his quest to get the Golden Fleece, killing her brother and disgracing her father and her native land in the process, Jason finds a new bride despite swearing an oath of fidelity to Medea. Medea is devastated when she finds out that Jason left her for another woman after two children and now wants to banish her. Medea plots revenge on Jason after he gives her one day to leave. Medea

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    Julius Caesar

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    but being a good person but makes an error in judgment, and when this error occurred it causes his own downfall. First off is that Brutus makes an error in judgment by joining the conspiracy to over throw Caesar. But the only reason that Brutus had joined was because his tragic flaw was honor; he lived his life on the guidelines of honor and loyalty. Now lastly Brutus had caused his very own downfall when after killing Caesar all of Rome has now turned against the conspirators. Those are some of the

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    Oedipus the King

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    Tiresias will bring Oedipus' 'birth' and 'destruction'. King Oedipus is the central protagonist and within his character lies a tragic flaw. He is unintentionally the architect of his own downfall. The strengths that once lead him to solve the riddle behind the sphinx later lead him to his own downfall. In the words of the priest; 'you helped us stand, only to fall once more'. Oedipus' hamartia is his anger. It lies at the root of the plot. It was fury that lead him to kill Laius. He was

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    Fatal Errors of Brutus

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    miscalculations eventually lead him to his own downfall. First, Brutus truthfully feels that the conspirators have enough will and intelligence to keep the plot concealed from others. He believes the conspirators will not confer with anyone who may feel betrayed by their plans and protect Caesar. For this reason, Brutus strongly goes against the conspirators taking an oath to pledge their loyalty to the group. Brutus proceeds by stating that through each conspirator’s own personal motive for defeating Caesar

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    the play's progression. The calm and confident Tiresias also acts as a foil for Oedipus through his dramatic difference in character, which allows the reader to see Oedipus for who he really is and realize that it was he who brought about his own downfall. Lastly, the wise prophet who functions as an authoritative father figure to the authority-threatened king (Lesser 147-148) helps make the motif of fathers, all of whom Oedipus sees as threats, evident. This motif of father figures is strongly

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    Dr. Faustus

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    Although aware of the consequences of such a pact, he is blinded by three things that bring about his ultimate demise. His greed to know all, his pride that made him believe he was better than man, and his denial that in the end he would bring his own downfall upon himself. If Faustus had not been these things he would not have brought an end to himself. Dr. Faustus denies the existence of everything, from his eventual torture in hell if he does not repent, to men, society, and indeed the world. The

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    Othello as Victim of Hamartia

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    Othello as Victim of Hamartia By definition, a tragedy is a story that details the downfall of a protagonist. Most often, the protagonist (tragic hero) is a member of high society who is faced with an oppositional force, be it internal or external. In his Poetics, Aristotle states that "tragedy is the imitation of an action; and an action implies personal agents, who necessarily possess certain distinctive qualities both of character and thought; for it is by these that we qualify actions themselves

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    Vengeance in The Count of Monte Cristo The corpse of Madame de Villefort lay stretched across the doorway leading to the room in which Edward's lifeless body resided. Eyes filled with tears, the miserable M. de Villefort revealed the sorrowful scene to Dantes. After beholding the results of his revenge "Monte Cristo became pale at this horrible sight; he felt he had passed beyond the bounds of vengeance, and that he could no longer say 'God is for and with me.'" Set in France during the turmoil

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    The Significance of the Coin Flips in Rosencrantz and Guildenstern At the beginning of the play "Rosencrantz and Guildensten," one of the two characters found a gold coin during their journey through the desert.  He immediately began to flip the coin to see what side it would land on.  By the seventh flip, two tails turned up.  Every flip after was heads.  The characters fliped the coin over 157 times, and they each after the seventh flip turned up heads.  The significance of the coin flips in

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