Free Omniscience Essays and Papers

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Free Omniscience Essays and Papers

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    God Is Omniscient Essay

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    knows everything is something that can comfort people or leave them feeling disturbed. One of the questions that go’s along with God’s omniscience is do we have free will. Are we truly free if God knows everything that has ever happened and will ever happen? Freedom is an idea that becomes nonexistent if God is omniscient. What does freedom mean if God has Omniscience? Humans cannot possibly be free to choose their lives if God knows everything. By examining the article Nelson Pike’s God’s Foreknowledge

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    will is inherently contradictory, therefore, they cannot coexist. This argument implicated predestination and often resonated with the dilemma of determinism, because God was supposed to have given mankind free will. In order to understand God’s omniscience, we must distinguish the important difference between human foreknowledge and divine foreknowledge, which the former is the contingent true, and the latter is the necessary true. Human beliefs are contingent true, because it could happen to be true

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    proposition, it does not immediately follow that the proposition is a necessary truth. Another discussion regarding omniscience and eternality is that of God’s immutability. Some have argued that being omniscient requires knowing different things at different times, therefore it is incompatible with immutability. This forms an objection to classical theism, which claims that omniscience and immutability are both foundational attributes of God.

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    the future is open—what the laws allow and what they do not allow. The process God is also aware of the conditions that creaturely decisions set upon future actualization, opening up some possibilities. Unlike the other characteristics of God, omniscience isn't necessarily required for the argument. Any situation God doesn't see can still be created as intended through the power of semi-potence or omnibenevolence. I gloss over omnibenevolence because it is implied by his interaction with the world

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    they study. But, in the Bible, there are certain passages that present the nature of God to man. In Psalm 139 the psalmist, David, clearly presents three of the attributes in the nature of God, His omniscience, His omnipresent, and His omnipotence. The first attribute presented in Psalm 139 is omniscience. Throughout the Psalm, David is constantly reminding the reader that God is omniscient. In the first six verses the psalmist compiles a list of thing that God knows about man. The chapter starts by

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    A Look at Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man is Hard to Find In the short story A Good Man is Hard to Find, Flannery O’Connor uses many different tactics to accurately portray the south in the 1950’s. O’Connor uses her style, themes, and point of view to tell a story of a family outing gone wrong. The story involves a grandmother, her only son and his wife, and their two bratty children, June Star and John Wesley. On their way to Florida, the grandmother convinces the family to detour to see an old

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    Renowned philosopher, J.L Mackie claims that it is positively irrational to believe that God exists, as religious belief is irrational. The reason Mackie claims God’s existence is irrational is due to the inconsistent triad. Essentially, the inconsistent triad is a set of propositions that cannot all be true at the same time; while two out of the three variables may be successful, it is fundamentally impossible for all three to co-exist at the same time (85). Of the three; God being: omnipotent,

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    villagers. The second part discusses the landscape setting and the events that are narrated from both Jude’s and an external omniscient point of view, which produce a representation of how the boy feels. The third part examines the use of external omniscience, which the narrator as authoritative voice reveals the setting of Marygreen and moreover establishes the reader perception of the boy’s place within this environment. The shifting point of view constructs Marygreen, partially, as an oppressive place

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    Problem Of Evil Essay

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    Topic: 1, Does the Problem of Evil show that God does not exist? Justify your answer and respond to possible objections. This essay is a conclusive look at the problems and contradictions underlying a belief in God and the observable traits of the world. This problem is traditionally labelled The Problem of Evil. This essay will be an analysis into the Problem of Evil and a counter rebuttal to objections levied against the Problem of Evil. This analysis will be on the nature of god and the world

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    This is portrayed through its limited omniscience, its shifting viewpoint and its unreliability. The narrators’ limited omniscience is seen through their inability to see into the depths of Miss Emily and her personal life; to see her thoughts, feelings and motives. No one knows the reason that she cut her hair, all that happened between her and Homer, and why she locked herself in her house for such a long time. The narrators also shows limited omniscience because the crucial events and people

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