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    Essay on “Ode: Intimations of Immortality” Kelsea Brewer Professor Flynn English 232 March 21, 2014 In William Wordsworth’s "Ode: Intimations of Immortality" the speaker laments the passing of his youth and the disappearance of “that dreamlike vividness and splendor which invest objects of sight in childhood” (179). As children, he explains, we lack knowledge of mortality and are closer to God and nature. With time, however

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    Ode Intimations of Immortality by William Wordsworth In Ode: Intimations of Immortality, William Wordsworth explores the moral development of man and the irreconcilable conflicts between innocence and experience, and youthfulness and maturity that develop. As the youth matures he moves farther away from the divinity of God and begins to be corruption by mankind. What Wordsworth wishes for is a return to his childhood innocence but with his new maturity and insight. This would allow him to experience

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    Loss of Childhood in Thomas’ Fern Hill and Wordsworth’s Ode: Intimations of Immortality Through the use of nature and time, Dylan Thomas’s "Fern Hill" and William Wordsworth’s “Ode: Intimations of Immortality” both address the agonizing loss of childhood. While Wordsworth recognizes that wisdom and experience recompense this loss(Poetry Criticism 370), Thomas views "life after childhood as bondage"(Viswanathan 286). As “Fern Hill” progresses, Thomas’s attitude towards childhood changes from

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    William Wordsworth

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    William Wordsworth William Wordsworth is considered to be the greatest among all of the English Romantic poets. Although he did not always get the recognition that he rightfully deserved in the early part of his career, only through trials and tribulations did he reach the pinnacle of the literary world. "Wordsworth said of "the Prelude" that it was "a thing unprecedented in the literary history that a man should talk so much about himself": " I had nothing to do but describe what I had felt

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    The poems, “Above Tintern Abbey” and “Intimations of Immortality written by the poet, William Wordsworth, pertain to a common theme of natural beauty. Relaying his history and inspirations within his works, Wordsworth reflects these events in each poem. The recurring theme of natural beauty is analogous to his experiences and travels. Wordsworth recognizes the connections nature enables humans to construct. The beauty of a “wild secluded scene” (Wordsworth, 1798, line 6) allows the mind to bypass

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    was defined by his hatred of being an adult. In the eyes of Wordsworth, the worst stage of life was adulthood. Since there were more obligations and things to worry about, adulthood was viewed as a miserable time as seen in his poem “Ode: The Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood”. Throughout his school days, Wordsworth would be outside running around and being free. This was the basis for many of his poems since he describes early childhood as a time to be deliberately free

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    Childhood The definition of children shifts depending on the person. To some the definition is a time without any worry, to others it is a more logical definition such as the period of time between infancy and adolescence. There are many different versions of this definition, and this is seen in the poetry of William Blake and William Wordsworth. These two authors have very different views on what it means to be a child and how they are portrayed in this era. Compared to now, Children in Blake’s

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    Unforgettably Joyful Two brilliant Romantic literary works by William Wordsworth, Ode: Intimations of Immorality from Recollections of Early Childhood and I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud, express in captivating detail the unforgettable joy one experiences in their lifetime. This joy can never be erased from memory, nor destroyed by present or future evils. The joy communicated in these stories conveys a sense of peaceful bliss that gives the reader a sense of inner harmony in the speaker’s soul. This

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    "Tintern Abbey" typifies William Wordsworth's desire to demonstrate what he sees as the oneness of the human psyche with that of the universal mind of the cosmos. It is his pantheistic attempt to unfurl the essence of nature's sublime mystery that often evades understanding, marking his progression as a young writer firmly rooted within the revolutionary tradition to one caught in perplexity about which way to proceed socially and morally, and further, to define for himself a new personal socio-political

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    Wordsworth and Vaughan

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    each, respectively. Thus, I propose considering Wordsworth in relation to an earlier man, Henry Vaughan. I am not the first to do so; much has been said of the link between these men regarding their analogous poems “The Retreat” and “Ode: Intimations of Immortality”—by comparing them I cannot claim any original insight. However, there is more common to these two men than two poems, and in analyzing what Wordsworth desires from poetry and the poet in his “Preface to the Lyrical Ballads” we see that

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