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    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

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    called Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, or OCD. In the past, this man with OCD would have been considered extremely strange, but it is now known that OCD is somewhat common in today’s world. The conditions of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder can be very uncomfortable and unsettling, but there are some ways to treat OCD. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is an anxiety disorder that causes a sufferer to have very uncomfortable obsessions and compulsions. The main anxiety of a sufferer of OCD is obsessive thoughts

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    OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) OCD is a very common disorder affecting almost everyone in the world, some being affected much more than others. First of all I will give a brief definition of OCD. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder causes the brain to get stuck on one particular urge or thought that can’t easily be let go. People with OCD often call it a case of, “mental hiccups that won’t go away.” Everyone has this condition in one way or another. For instance, a man might go into a bathroom and

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    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

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    prevalence’s that are associated with it. This disorder also has various causes and treatment methods that go along with the disease as a whole. Today the disease is more widely known and there is lots of information about it available. Symptoms: Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder is a mental disease in which people have either a combination of obsessions and compulsions or each individually (Britannica). Obsessions can be things that cause one to worry and that cause anxiety in a person, certain urges and

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    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

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    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder which can afflict a person throughout his lifetime: "The individual who suffers from OCD becomes trapped in a pattern of repetitive thoughts and behaviors that are senseless and distressing but extremely difficult to overcome" (http:www.nimh.nih.gov/publicat/ocd.htm). Obsessions and compulsions are the two main components of this disorder. The former are often highly negative such as an ever-present fear

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    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

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    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Obsessive-compulsive disorder, commonly known as OCD, is a type of anxiety disorder and was one of the three original neuroses as defined by Freud. It is characterized by "recurrent, persistent, unwanted, and unpleasant thoughts (obsessions) or repetitive, purposeful ritualistic behaviors that the person feels driven to perform (compulsions)." (1) The prime feature that differentiates OCD from other obsessive or compulsive disorders is that the sufferer understands

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    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Imagine if you couldn’t get your job done because throughout your shift you had to continuously wash your hands. To many people this would be an easy problem but not if you have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Several little thoughts or rituals irritate a person with OCD daily. There are many factors, symptoms, and treatments regarding OCD. OCD is known as one of the anxieties disorders (geocities). It can be a crippling condition that can persist throughout a person’s

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    Obsessive-Compulsive Behaviors "Compulsive" and "obsessive" have become everyday words. "I'm compulsive" is how some people describe their need for neatness, punctuality, and shoes lined up in the closets. "He's so compulsive is shorthand for calling someone uptight, controlling, and not much fun. "She's obsessed with him" is a way of saying your friend is hopelessly lovesick. That is not how these words are used to describe Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder or OCD, a strange and fascinating sickness

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    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

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    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a mental illness that traps people in endless cycles of repetitive thoughts and behaviors. Pierre Janet described obsessive-compulsive disorder by using the term psychasthenia. Sigmund Freud described obsessions and compulsions as psychological defenses used to deal with sexual and aggressive conflicts in the unconscious mind (Bruce Bower: 1987). OCD is also known as “The Doubting Disease,” because it’s as though the mind doesn’t register when the person does

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    Obsessive-compulsive disorder, otherwise known as OCD is not just and adult disorder, but it also affects children and crosses racial, ethnic and cultural planes, that is the broad perspective. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is defined by two words, obsessive and compulsion. Obsessions according to Nolen-Hoeksema, 2014 are defined as thoughts, images, ideas, or urges (e.g., to harm oneself) that are persistent, that uncontrollably intrude on consciousness, and that usually cause significant anxiety

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    Introduction I want to write about obsessive-compulsive disorder because it is a very important thing in the life of humans that is present and that sometimes it is not taken care of or the people don't really know a lot about it. And when it is present people don't know what it is happening with the person provoking the ritual and then the question from the observer comes and commentaries are maid without really knowing the truth of what really is happening. In this essay

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