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    The title of this essay “Silence and the Notion of the Commons” gives the same idea of people as programmable and unprogrammable similar to the idea seen in the Matrix. Whereas programmable people, who are the commons, are the people inside the matrix they are also known as the sheep, the people that believe in everything they are told. The unprogrammable people, who are the silence, are the people outside of the matrix. Ursula Franklin uses a variety of techniques in order for the audience to fully

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    A Notion of Zero in the Philosophy of Aristotle ABSTRACT: This article shows that Aristotle created the first notion of a zero in the history of human thought. Since this notion stood in evident contradiction to the basic principles of his metaphysics and logic, he rejected it. The origin and development of mathematical symbols was closely connected with the development of mathematics itself and development of philosophy. It resulted from the fact that philosophy provided the motivation for

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    Aristotele’s Notion of Body and Soul, and My opinion What is Aristotele’s notion of body and soul? According to Aristotle, everything in the world is divided between superior and inferior. Man is superior to the animals, the male to the female, and the soul to the body. “The soul is more noble than our possesions or our bodies';. Therefore, man should act through his soul, and not through his body. The soul services the greater good. If a man does not act from his soul, and thus lets his body

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    Response to Movie "Ethnic Notions" The movie 'Ethnic Notions' describes different ways in which African-Americans were presented during the 19th and 20th centuries. It traces and presents the evolution of the rooted stereotypes which have created prejudice towards African-Americans. This documentary movie is narrated to take the spectator back to the antebellum roots of African-American stereotypical names such as boy, girl, auntie, uncle, Sprinkling Sambo, Mammy Yams, the Salt and Pepper Shakers

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    Richard Nixon and the Notion of Presidential Power "Actions which otherwise would be unconstitutional, could become lawful if undertaken for the purpose of preserving the Constitution and the Nation." The idea that certain actions are not illegal if used to preserve the best interests of a nation has drawn sharp criticism from the time of Lincoln through today. Presidents of the United States do take a solemn oath in which they promise to “ . . . preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of

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    Ontological Relativism and the Pragmatic Notion of Metaphysical Truth ABSTRACT: I. Introduction The mind body problem resembles a black hole in the universe of philosophy: It takes a lot of energy which could be spent otherwise. Therefore, it would be liberating to show that it is not a problem at all. That is exactly what I shall do in this paper. Roughly, I shall argue as follows: First, I will show that the traditional mind body problem as a logical conflict will not occur if one is

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    The Notion of a Double in Wuthering Heights Brontë's Wuthering Heights is the captivating tale of two families and the relationships that develop between them.  The narrator, Mr. Lockwood, relates the story as told to him by Ellen, the housekeeper.  The novel contains an excellent illustration of the doppel-ganger, the notion of a double.  Generally, this concept is applied to specific characters, as in Poe's William Wilson.  However, the concept appears in Wuthering Heights in two different ways

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    Notions of Selflessness in Sartrean Existentialism and Theravadin Buddhism ABSTRACT: In this essay I examine the relationship between Sartre's phenomenological description of the "self" as expressed in his early work (especially Being and Nothingness) and elements to be found in some approaches to Buddhism. The vast enormity of this task will be obvious to anyone who is aware of the numerous schools and traditions through which the religion of Buddhism has manifested itself. In order to be brief

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    Investigate notions of sisters and sisterhood within Top Girls In Act 1 the women at the dinner party, speak of their suffering in the past, but they all relate to Marlene and to each other as a sisterhood of the present, even though the women represent contemporary figures supposedly alive in the early 1980’s in England. Lady Nijo and Pope Joan are similar in that they both had babies in difficult situations, and both stood up for their rights as women. The portrayal of these women contrasts

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    Jean-Paul Sartre - Problems with the Notion of Bad Faith In Being and Nothingness, Jean-Paul Sartre presents the notion of "bad faith." Sartre is a source of some controversy, when considering this concept the following questions arise. "Of what philosophical value is this notion? Why should I attend to what one commentator rightly labels Sartre's 'Teutonically metaphysical prose' (Stevenson, p. 253), in order to drag out some meaning from a work so obviously influenced by Heidegger? Is

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    Kipling’s Notions of Race in Plain Tales from the Hills "No other Western writer has ever known India as Kipling knew it" "nobody can teach you British India better than Rudyard Kipling" "There will always be plenty in Kipling that I will find difficult to forgive; but there is also enough truth in these stories to make them impossible to ignore". Salman Rushdie, "Kipling", from Imaginary Homelands, London: Granta Books, 1991, 74-80. It may be discerned from the quotes displayed above

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    wanted to show. The modernist society had forced many others into a life just like Prufrock lead. Unable to find true joy in any activity, everyone is subjected to trivial pursuits, shallow goals, and no pleasurable experiences. It was created by the notion that the things that you can’t explain or want to know should just be avoided. If one person couldn’t figure them out, then it was impossible for all. And therefore, society should just give up and come to the realization that the time of great thinking

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    Synesthetic Reality - Is our notion of reality the only truth? "What's first strikes me is the color of someone's voice. [V--] has a crumbly, yellow voice, like a flame with protruding fibers. Sometimes I get so interested in the voice, I can't understand what's being said." --From Synesthesia: A Union of the Senses by Robert E. Cytowic. What would you make of the preceding account? Would you think the speaker was...crazy?...on drugs?...making a play for attention? Would you be skeptical if the

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    Confused Notions of Good and Evil in East of Eden East of Eden is an epic novel about individual ethics - whether men and women have the power to choose between good and evil. East of Eden, to be polite, it is not Steinbeck's best novel. Not by a long shot. Steinbeck had wrestled with a moral question and lost. It was as though he had been thinking about life, but not too deeply. "East of Eden" was a third-rate best seller, the story of two American families over three generations, seven decades

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    Gender-Based Notions of Homoerotic Love: Sappho and Plato’s Symposium The poetry of Sappho, and the speeches in Plato’s Symposium both deal primarily with homoerotic love, although Sappho, one of the only female poets in Ancient Greece, speaks from the female perspective, while Plato’s work focuses on the nature of this love between men. There are several fundamental elements that are common to both perspectives, including similar ideals of youth and beauty, and the idea of desire as integral

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    Peculiar Institutions Reconfiguring Notions of Political Participation Through the Narratives of Hannah Crafts and Harriet Jacobs In her narrative Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Harriet Jacobs says, “If the secret memoirs of many members of Congress should be published, curious details would be unfolded” (142). Jacobs here, and throughout her narrative, reveals herself as a political outsider in all possible senses. She does not, herself, know what stories are told in the so-called “secret

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    soul and the badness of the flesh still remain a significant notion in contemporary thought.  Even Whitman's literary predecessor, Emerson, chose to distinctly differentiate the soul from all nature.  Whitman, however, chooses to reevaluate that relationship. His exploration of human sensuality, particularly human sexuality, is the tool with which he integrates the spirit with the flesh. Key to this integration is Whitman's notion of the ability of the sexual self to define itself. This self-definition

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    light, 'thou flaming minister', 'thy former light'. Further, if one views beauty and light in this context as heavenly then the animality and darkness can be seen to correspond to that which is secular, a notion which Othello communicates in the opening speech of the final scene, placing earthly notions of justice against... ... middle of paper ... ...scene and the misogynistic views of such as Iago, 'How if she be black and witty'' with the later scene of Act IV Scne iii and Desdemona's refusal to

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    Representationalism and Antirepresentationalism - Kant, Davidson and Rorty (1) ABSTRACT: The notions of representationalism and antirepresentationalism are introduced and used in contemporary philosophical discussions by Richard Rorty to describe his and the neopragmatists' attitude toward traditional problems of epistemology. Rorty means that the history of philosophy shows that there are no final answers to the traditional questions about knowledge, truth, and representation; consequently, they

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    my view of direct perception. According to these arguments, the notion of direct perception as I construe it is objectionable since: (1) it is epistemically worthless since it leaves perceived objects uninterpreted; (2) it cannot explain how perceived objects are identified; and (3) it is ill-prepared to assign objective content to perceptual states. What is involved in the claim that one directly perceives an object? The notion of direct perception that I propose to defend in this paper is this:

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