Free Norm-referenced test Essays and Papers

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Free Norm-referenced test Essays and Papers

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    Racial and Cultural Test Bias, Stereotype Threat and Their Implications A substantial amount of educational and psychological research has consistently demonstrated that African American students underperform academically relative to White students. For example, they tend to receive lower grades in school (e.g., Demo & Parker, 1987; Simmons, Brown, Bush, & Blyth, 1978), score lower on standardized tests of intellectual ability (e.g., Bachman, 1970; Herring, 1989; Reyes & Stanic, 1988; Simmons

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    misuse of norm-referenced tests can impact the assessment and treatment of a client. Norm-referenced tests provide a comparison between the skills and behaviors assessed of a client to the relevant norms of a similar age group. According to the article, a clinician must ensure to properly use a norm-referenced test in order to provide evidence as to whether a client may need more assessments or whether a certain treatment approach is more beneficial to the client. However, the misuse of a norm-referenced

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    Review of the SAT Test

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    researching the types of tests that are administered to determine intelligence, it became very clear that there were many differing opinions surrounding the efficacy of intelligence testing. There exists compelling information that suggest there is a lack of ability for any test to clearly identify and measure intelligence. It is very clearly noted that there is a question of the ability for academics based testing to measure a persons intelligence. One of the most noted tests in the United States

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    The Failure of Standardized Testing

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    percent of students to be proficient in both reading and math in state given tests by the year 2014. Some criticized that the act permitted states to define what proficient is. Others criticized the punishments for not meeting the targets that were set, which included closure or privatization of schools, losing funds, or being labeled as failing (Ravitch web). Because of those factors, heavy emphases on standardized tests were put in place in schools across the United States. The No Child Left Behind

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    been subjected to standardized tests frequently through their years in school due to laws which have been passed by Congress. Decisions about the evaluation of schools and students are recurrently made by government authority and are often not in the best interest of teachers, students, or their classroom environments. What do students achieve from standardized testing? Achievement means something that somebody has succeeded in doing. “Achievement is more than just test scores but also includes class

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    History of the ACT and SAT

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    spending weekends and free time studying for these standardized tests (“About Us”; “What We Do”). A student’s entire education is put to the test, and eventually converted into a number that is allegedly able to tell how successful he or she will be in his or her first year of college. One Saturday exam could decide a student’s fate in further education, but no pressure, right? When put to the test, extensive research shows that these tests are not all they are cracked up to be. ACT and SAT examinations

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    It's Time to Get Rid of Standardized Tests

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    paying for school, and their test scores. All of these have a very important impact on what a student will do for the next few years of their life. Unfortunately, in our society, test scores are an extremely important factor in the college admissions process. Students are highly encouraged to put forth a serious effort in order to achieve the best possible score. “To this day, most four-year colleges require applicants to take one or more of a number of standardized tests for admission, and your

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    standardized testing

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    Standardized test scores have an enormous amount of weight in the college admission process. But these tests raise a lot of questions: Will they really test the intelligence of a student? Do time limits on these standardized tests give accurate measurement of a student’s ability to perform well? The importance of high-stake tests are unquestionable as they have the ability to sway college applications and acceptances. Although many argue otherwise, research shows that standardized test scores are actually

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    The Flaws of Standardized Testing

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    testing has been a norm for over seventy-five years in almost every first- world country. From state regulated tests, to the “college-worthy” ACT and SAT, standardized tests have become a dreaded rite of passage for every student. The earliest record of standardized testing originates from China. It was created to test knowledge of Confucian poetry and philosophy for men applying for government jobs. In 1905 a man by the name of Alfred Binet created his own, “standardized test of intelligence.” Binet’s

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    Standardized Testing

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    measure what is necessary to be successful in life. Ayers insists that Standardized tests such as the American College Test (ACT) and the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) measure specific facts and function which are among the least interesting and slightest important information that children should know. In an article titled “Testing the Right Way for Talent”, written by Hugh Price, argues the fact that standardized tests fail to capture the qualities that are necessary to be successful in the business

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