Free Norm-referenced test Essays and Papers

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Free Norm-referenced test Essays and Papers

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    The Problems With College-Entrance Testing

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    factor for college acceptance for students? The most accurate answer would be standardized test scores. While other factors are considered in acceptance, the ACT and SAT scores are what is most crucial to a student’s acceptance. Colleges put too much stock in standardized test scores when considering admission. Standardized test scores: limit diversity and creativity, represent skill more than progress, cause test taking anxiety, and result in inaccurate placement due to differently interpreted results

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    Standardized tests like the SAT and ACT are on everyone ‘s minds as the November 1st early admission deadline approaches. As a high school senior I know that it is a very stressful time. The competition is intense, we are not only competing with people from our school for a slot in a college class, but we are competing against students across the nation. The competition is between people from every background imaginable; public schools, private schools, AP, honors, and academic classes, wealthy

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    Standardized Testing

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    Almost every high school student will take it: the standardized test. Tests like the SAT and ACT are used to measure how well a student will do in his or her college life, but these tests are not always accurate. There are many different types of students and most of the high scores and low scores correlate to certain groups of students which is why some argue these tests are biased. Standardized tests, especially the ones that measure college success, are not as effective at ranking a student’s

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    After taking the Personal Survey of Assessment Literacy, I learned a lot about myself and what I do know about assessments, and what I don’t. This survey allowed me to reflect on the process that I take to plan, develop, and administer tests in my class and what I need to do with the results. When I went through the criteria of all of the topics in the survey, I honestly did not know what the survey was talking about or what it meant. This was really concerning to me because I like to think that

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    standardized tests

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    Standardized tests. We’ve all heard of them. Most of us have taken them, and hopefully passed them. But how many of us really know what they are. In other words, what exactly is a “standardized test”? If you ask a hundred teachers or other members of the educational community, you might get 50 different answers. The truth is, according to a well-respected glossary of educational terms, the definition of a standardized test is “any form of test that (1) requires all test takers to answer the same

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    The Importance Of The SAT

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    SAT stands for Scholastic Aptitude Test. The definition of aptitude is the “natural ability to do something or to learn something.” (1) Based on the name, one can gather that the SAT is a test that does not test your knowledge but how you attain it. College Board is the company that publishes and owns the SAT. The SAT was design based on an IQ test which means is meant to test a student’s ability they were born with not abilities gained through schooling. The SAT is said to be a predictor of how

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    talented ice skater, but the standardized test showed her that she wasn’t good at anything. It did not recognize the talents she did have, only the ones that she didn’t. Standardized tests do not measure up in today’s world because they are not accommodating for all learning styles, they lack validity, and the information being tested is not practical. Standardized tests have been a part of the education system since the early 1800’s ("Standardized Tests," 2014, para 1). Before this though, the

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    Standardized Stress: Sleep, Eat, Study

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    is linked to a variety of disorders, from severe anxiety to persistent fatigue. Around 1 in 10 American teens suffer from stress-related disorders. The overwhelming majority of this stress is a byproduct of a common and feared tool: standardized tests. Such exams claim to predict college performance in an objective fashion and in large bolded letters. But, they are not as fair as they seem. In reality, the SAT, and its counterpart, the ACT, are poor indicators of college performance. High school

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    like a good idea to give a bunch of students the same test and see how each one does, it is not that simple. The results do not represent how smart a student is or a student's potential to do great things in the real world. In taking a standardized test one student may have a greater advantage over another for many reasons. Reasons that are not shown in the standardized test score. There are many issues one might face when about to take a test, some students may "have something major interfering

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    Americans realized how inferior their education systems really were. Due to the decline in test scores in American schools, education standards became much stricter and new intelligence exams were introduced. Presently, standardized testing, such as the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and the American College Testing Program (ACT), is a mandatory and important part of the college acceptance process. Although these exams test students on the same topics, genders have proven to be stronger in some fields and

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