Free Nora Ephron Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    appearance of being right.” Appearances are the first thing to catch one’s attention. Whether it be a supermodel, a famous photograph, or the unmistakable golden arches: we take notice. The essays written by Judith Ortiz Cofer, Eric Schlosser, and Nora Ephron demonstrate the effect appearances have on individuals and our society undividedly. In Judith Ortiz Cofer's essay "The Story of My Body," she shares her struggle with appearance and self-esteem. Ms. Cofer admits her definitions of appearance changed

    • 992 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Necessity of Truth: Censorship in Nora Ephron’s “The Boston Photographs” Originally published in 1975, Nora Ephron’s essay “The Boston Photographs” is both still relevant and controversial almost forty years later. It deals with the series of three photographs that were published in newspapers across the country. The most important one shows a mother and child falling off a collapsed fire escape. Both have their limbs outstretched. If both had survived, maybe the reaction would have been different

    • 917 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Communication Word count: 999 Name of Speech: Commencement Address to Wellesley Class of 1996 – Nora Ephron Commencement speeches, which are presented in American graduation ceremonies, aim to inspire and motivate. Successfully, Nora Ephron 's commencement speech addressed to the Wellesley Class of 1996; inspired her audience to "be the heroine of [their '] li[ves], not the victim". Through anecdotes, Ephron explored the differences between her education and the graduates at Wellesley College, to remind

    • 1035 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Picture Perfect

    • 585 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited

    rally a protest, yet this is the same society who will pay $8.90 to see a horror movie accepts the sighting, sounds, and vivid image of a gruesome death? Yea okay. If this is acceptable then so is print! While reading The Boston Photographs by Nora Ephron, I really started to take to her way of thinking, and she thinks that newspapers should publish more photos of death. Well I completely agree. Nora's first reason states, "Beyond that, the pictures are classics, old-fashioned but perfect examples

    • 585 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    provides fast food chains that are deleterious to our health, but since corporations made them popular, the average American thinks nothing of it. Even though a lot of American popular culture isn’t the best choice in our lives, Judith Ortiz Cofer, Nora Ephron, and Eric Schlosser use this theme of popular culture in their essays. In Cofer’s “The Story of My Body”, the author talks about her experience growing up in a world where her culture and looks does not fit into America’s popular cultured society

    • 992 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    you would lie if you were in his place.” Under most circumstances people in the world today would lie before they tell the true. I believe people would rather stretch the truth, than be honest with themselves and with others. Judith Ortiz Cofer, Nora Ephron, and Eric Schlosser, demonstrate honesty throughout their essays. Cofer’s essay “The Story of My Body” is an autobiography focusing on her childhood; how she honestly felt about herself growing up. She was truthful about her skin color; she did

    • 811 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    therefore, this is why photographs are noteworthy. This statement rings valid; many people, including Nora Ephron, agree with it. Moreover, Ephron writes a final essay called “The Boston Photographs”, and she references an occurrence where a woman deceased. The photographs of her and her child falling are visible in news articles. People believe that these pictures were too private. Nevertheless, Ephron believes that newspapers should not censor obscenities from the public because they represent certain

    • 942 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    realizing where they are headed. Annie proclaims, “What I really don’t want to do is end up always wondering what might have been, knowing I could have done something”. (Reed) The movie Sleepless in Seattle was produced in 1993 and directed by Nora Ephrons. It stars Meg Ryan playing Annie Reed, Tom Hanks playing Sam Baldwin and Ross Malinger playing Sam’s son Jonah. The film begins with a graveside scene as Jonah and Sam are standing beside the casket of their wife and mother. Sam explains to Jonah

    • 1240 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The central theme of A Doll's House is secession from society. It is demonstrated by several of its characters breaking away from the social standards of their time and acting on their own terms. No one character demonstrates this better than Nora. During the time in which the play took place society frowned upon women asserting themselves. Women were supposed to play a role in which they supported their husbands, took care of their children, and made sure everything was perfect around the

    • 552 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    game of hide and seek that Nora plays with her children, she also plays with her husband.  She hides her actions and her true personality from him.  He also hides his life from her.  Thinking that she would never even understand, he keeps all the business of their relationship secret from her.  Although Nora hides from her husband, she also plays the role of seeker.  Nora wants to seek out the truth of her life.  Much of the play is a game of hide and seek. Excellent. Nora plays a game of "hide and

    • 1682 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Character of Torvald and Nora in A Doll's House In Ibsen's "A Doll's House", there are many clues that hint at the kind of marriage Nora and Torvald have. It seems that Nora is a type of doll that is controlled by Torvald. Nora is completely dependent on Torvald.  His thoughts and movements are her thoughts and movements.  Nora is a puppet who is dependent on its puppet master for all of its actions. The most obvious example of Torvald's physical control over Nora can be seen in his teaching

    • 1045 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    A Doctor In The House

    • 968 Words
    • 2 Pages

    the lack of communication between Nora and her husband. Nora confides in Dr. Rank, involving him in secrets and everyday conversation. For instance, Rank is the first character to be let in on Nora's secret plan to take Helmer on a "vacation," supposedly paid for by her father. Also, Rank refers to Christine Linde as "a name I have often heard in this house," when Helmer is virtually unaware of Linde's existence (Ibsen 542). The quote further indicates Rank and Nora share things in which Helmer is

    • 968 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    bringer of fortune and influence. In his play A Doll's House, Henrik Ibsen portrays, through the character of Nora, the power women are gaining in patriarchal societies. Nora, who symbolizes all women, exercises her power throughout the entire play. She cleverly manipulates the men around her while, to them, she seems to be staying in her subordinate role. In all three acts of the play Nora controls many situations and yields the most power. Act I, along with the introduction of Ibsen's tone and

    • 984 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Nora is a captivating character in Ibsen's A Doll's House. She swings between extremes: she is either very happy or immensely depressed, prosperous or completely desperate, wise or naive, impotent or purposeful. You can understand this range in Nora, because she staggers between the person she pretends to be and the one she someday hopes to become. Throughout the play, Nora is portrayed as subordinate to her male counterpart, Torvald. As most other men during this time, Torvald believed that women

    • 1244 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    decisions. In A Doll’s House, Nora, Mrs. Linden, and the nurse must all make decisions crucial to the importance of their lives. It is very evident throughout the story that these women must give up important aspects of their lives not only for themselves, but also for others. The nurse is a key importance in Nora’s life. She has been the only mother Nora has known. In order to be Nora’s mother, however, the nurse ultimately had to give up her own child. When Nora is speaking with the nurse at

    • 721 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    play. Ibsen sets up the Act by first introducing us to the central issue: Nora and her relation to the exterior world (Nora entering with her packages). Nora serves as a symbol for women of the time; women who were thought to be content with the luxuries of modern society with no thought or care of the world in which they lived. Indeed, there is some truth in this (the extent of this is debatable). As the play reveals, Nora does delight in material wealth, having been labeled a spendthrift from an

    • 2523 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    was created - it is merely a household decoration.  In Ibsen's symbolic play A Doll House, Nora is the bird, and her marriage is the cage. Externally, Nora is a beautiful creature entertaining her husband with the beautiful images of a docile wife, but internally, she is a desperate creature longing to explore her potential outside the cage of her marriage. In a society dominated by the expectations of men, Nora must choose between the obligations determined by her role as wife in opposition to the

    • 1839 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 4 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Growth of Nora and Kristina Linde in A Doll's House A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen, is a play that was written ahead of its time. In this play Ibsen tackles prevailing social norms by presenting two strong-willed women. Both Kristina and Nora chose the men they married by an intellectual rather than an emotional process: Kristina gave up the man she loved (Nils Krogstad) to provide economic security for her mother and her two younger brothers; Nora married Torvald Helmer at a time when he

    • 1019 Words
    • 3 Pages
    • 3 Works Cited
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    plays are significant in that they avoid the social temptation of using a man as a protagonist. Looking deeper into the stories, however, one can see that in even more contradiction with society, the female characters go against men. Both Antigone and Nora step into the spotlight as the female hero who has been put in a compromising situation and is forced to decide whether it is more important to follow what society dictates, or go with what they feel is moral and just. Antigone is faced with

    • 686 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Lie in Ibsen's A Doll's House

    • 1839 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 8 Works Cited

    when first heard, but the true intention behind it may have been for helpful purposes or for protection.  In Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House, a lie was created to help and protect a loved one - yet it resulted in a catastrophic act. The character Nora lives her life, in one sense, as a complete lie. She never thought for herself or had her own opinions. Nora's father would tell her "what he thought about everything" leaving her no "opinion but his" (Ibsen 428). If she did have an opinion of her

    • 1839 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 8 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays