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    The Second Noble Truth of Buddhism

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    The Second Noble Truth - “Samudaya" The Truth of the Origin or the Cause of Suffering According to the philosophy of Buddhism is the Second Noble Truth : "Samudaya", the truth of the origin or the cause of suffering. Buddhists also believe that the origin of suffering is `attachment'. The Second Noble Truth invites us to understand the principle, that the origin of suffering is attachment to transient things and the ignorance thereof. Transient things do not only include the physical objects

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    the Four Noble Truths in which supporters could go by in order to escape difficulties that prevent true nature. Following the Four Noble truths might lead to the good life. Three in particular include: Life is suffering, all suffering is caused by desires, and there is a way to end suffering. The first truth, life is suffering, includes pain, getting old as well as loneliness or disappointment. Buddhism educates how suffering can be escaped and how we can be indeed happy. The second truth, suffering

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    The Second of Four Noble Truths “ ‘I have sons, I have wealth’: thinking thus the fool is troubled. Indeed, he himself is not his own. How can sons or wealth be his?” The Second of the Four Noble Truths is Samudaya, translated as craving and greed. This is a practice that is completely inescapable of all people. There is no one who does not want, no one who could not think of just one more thing to make him self “happy”. It is the given nature of all people to desire what the do

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    The Four Noble Truths

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    The Four Noble Truths The four sights that Siddhartha was hidden from all his life are what compelled him to find the Four Noble Truths. When Siddhartha set out to see the outside world he saw the sights of old age, sickness, death, and the wandering monk. Siddhartha’s ultimate goal was to end all the suffering he had experienced as well as what he had seen others experience. His discovery of the solution began with the recognition that life is suffering. The First Noble Truth is that the suffering

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    Buddhism’s Four Noble Truths Siddharta Gautama was twenty-nine years old when he abandoned his family to search for a means to bring to an end his and other’s suffering after studying meditation for many years. At age thirty-five, Siddharta Gautama sat down under the shade of a fig tree to meditate and he determined to meditate until he reached enlightenment. After seven weeks he received the Great Enlightenment which he referred to as the Four Noble Truths and the Eight-fold Path. Henceforth he

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    Four Noble Truths

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    and Four Noble Truths. Specifically, the Four Noble Truths are about the four steps that elaborate on suffering. According to our module five lecture notes, The Truths concludes; • The Truth of suffering (dukkha) • The truth of the cause of suffering (samudaya) • The truth of the end of suffering (nirhodha) • The truth of the path that frees from suffering (magga) Each one of these four truths explored the realization and understanding of the teachings of Buddhism.” The first Noble Truth intended

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    The Four Noble Truths

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    THE FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS "Believe nothing just because a so-called wise person said it. Believe nothing just because a belief is generally held. Believe nothing just because it is said in ancient books. Believe nothing just because it is said to be of divine origin. Believe nothing just because someone else believes it. Believe only what you your self test and judge to be true." -Buddha The four noble truths exemplify the essence of the teachings of Buddha. They represent the beginning of a long

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    The Four Noble Truths

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    Buddha once said “As the great ocean has built one taste, the taste of salt, this Dharma has but one taste, the taste of freedom.” The Four Noble Truths sum up the basics of Buddha’s teaching, though he has left many things left unanswered. The Eightfold Path breaks down these four nobles into three different categories to help us further understand them. All over the world 300 million or about 6% of Americans practice Buddhism, which was established by Siddhartha Gautama, also known as the “Enlightened

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    Q2. Outline and discuss the four noble truths: is the Buddhist view of existence optimistic or pessimistic? The question of the Buddhist view of existence being optimistic or pessimistic is one which is many have an opinion on. It could be said that the four noble truths provide the views of the Buddha in the way that life is led and more importantly, should be led. Certainly, the end goal is clearly optimistic, the attainment of spiritual enlightenment, or nirvana. However, the Buddhist view of

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    The Four Noble Truths, the foundation of all Buddhist thought, describe the beginning and end of suffering, as well as the process to end it. Buddha’s Thesis of Emptiness (Sunyata) asserts that our world isn’t real. Our lives are a realistic dream; furthermore, we only assume our environment and experiences are real. Additionally, we cannot wake up from this dream until we realize that reality is a delusion. At this point, we can then “terminate our attachment, our discernment, our perception, our

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