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    The New Negro History

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    The New Negro History “….We form a spoke in the human wheel, and it is necessary that we should understand our dependence on the different parts, and their on us, in order to perform our part with propriety.” This excerpt from the first Negro newsletter was written by John Russwurm and made a bold statement to how unparalleled the Negro community is to America. Portraying the many changes the Negro Community has come through, life for the new Negro was advanced but nowhere near luxurious. Written

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    Portraying the New Negro in Art

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    20th centuries Blacks in America were debating on the proper way to define and present the Negro to America. Leaders such as Alain Lock, W.E.B. Dubois, Marcus Garvey, and Tuskegee University founder Booker T. Washington all had ideas of a New Negros who was intellectually smart, politically astute, and contributors to society in trade work. All four influential leaders wrote essays to this point of the new Negro and their representations in art and life. In “Art or Propaganda”, Locke pleas not for corrupt

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    “The New Negro” written by Alain Locke focused on self-expression of the black community. The title speaks for itself meaning “a new type of negro” or black person. In the north during the Harlem Renaissance, black people were becoming independent. They started branching off making their own art, music, and poetry, and opening their own businesses and forming their own new communities. It was a new negro as opposed to the old negro; a black man with a slave mentality. Now, black men viewed himself

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    The New Negro Movement

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    Shortly after Rachel was written in 1916, the New Negro Movement began to gain traction in the African American community. This broad cultural movement focused on promoting a public image of African Americans as industrious, urban, independent, and distinct from the subservient and illiterate “Old Negro” of the rural South. Unlike his predecessor, the New Negro was self-sufficient, intellectually sophisticated, creative, knowledgeable and proud of his racial heritage (Krasner, Beautiful Pageant 140)

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    The Harlem Renaissance and the "New Negro"

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    attend schools with white children, most were stripped of their right to vote, and racial violence by groups such as the Ku Klux Klan were everyday occurrences. “In an era marked by race riots, a resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan, and new brands of scientific racism, the New Negro of the Harlem Renaissance embraced black beauty, African roots, and African folk wisdom while projecting urban sophistication, celebrating the social and biological mixing of the races, and holding out for democratic practices

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    New Negro

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    abolition of slavery in the United States presented southern African Americans with many new opportunities, including the option of relocation in search of better living conditions. The mass movement of black people from the rural areas of the South to the cities of the North, known as the Black Migration, came in the 1890s when black men and women left the south to settle in cities such as Philadelphia and New York, fleeing from the rise of Jim Crowe Laws and searching for work. This migration of

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    After the Civil War ended and slavery was abolished, African Americans were hopeful for the new opportunities that they believed would arise from their newly prescribed freedom. However, lingering prejudices persisted throughout the aftermath of the war. The African Americans included formerly enslaved blacks in the South, many of whom relocated to larger population centers in the North. They sought to reconstruct America into a nation of equal opportunity where they would not be considered inferior

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    Analysis of the New Negro

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    beginning Alain Locke tells us about the “tide of negro migration.” During this time in a movement known as the Great Migration, thousands of African-Americans also known as Negros left their homes in the South and moved North toward the beach line of big cities in search of employment and a new beginning. As Locke stated, “the wash and rush of this human tide on the beach line of Northern city centers is to be explained primarily in terms of a new vision of opportunity, of social and economic freedom

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    The New Negro Movement named after the great African American writer, Alain Locke, later known, as the Harlem Renaissance was a time for the African American culture and art to grow. With that growth also came population growth. Artists from the South migrated during the Great migration to the north and Midwest Industrial cities. The Great Migration relocated 6 million African Americans from 1916-1970 and this led to a huge urban impact in the United States. One of the most impacted cities during

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    “The New Negro” as described by Alain Locke is seeking social justice, however he is doing so in a way different from the various forms of resistance that preceded him. Locke describes a shift from radicalism in the fight for social justice to a need to build a relationship between races. The “New Negro” has come to the realization that assimilation into American culture is not a viable answer; therefore he has decided to build his own culture in collaboration with American culture. The construction

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    to a new world of literature. McKay soon left Jamaica and would never return to his homeland. In 1912, only 23 years old, Jekyll paid his way to the United Sates to study agriculture at Tuskegee Institute. Before leaving Jamaica, McKay had gotten a reputation as a poet. He had produced two volumes of dialect poetry, Song of Jamaica and Constab Ballads. His work is said to always echo both the British colony’s musical dialect and the sharp anger of its subject race. McKay moved to Harlem, New York

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    Harlem Renaissance

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    important period of self-discovery in African-American history after the Civil War. Black literature went through a tremendous outbreak in Harlem, which is a district of New York City. In the middle of the changing atmosphere, a small group of black men and women began a public relations campaign to promote what they called the "New Negro" movement. While these men and women promoted art and literature, they were credited with starting much more than just and intellectual movement. This movement included

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    "Much of the creative work of the period was guided by the ideal of the Negro which signified a range of ethical ideals that often emphasize and intensified a higher sense of group and social cohesiveness... The writers ... literally expected liberation .... from their work and were perhaps the first group of Afro- American writers to believe that art could radically transform the artist and attitudes of other human beings". - Dictionary of Literacy Biography Alain Leroy Locke

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    The Harlem Renaissance

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    blind respect for tradition held by previous generations. Instead the youth that witnessed the ‘Great War’ sought substitutes by indulging in the new, trendy, young, and vibrant. This atmosphere set the scene for the New Negro Movement, also known as the Harlem Renaissance. For the first time, America was willing to pay attention to black culture and its new style and ideas. A search for jobs in the wake of World War I prompted a mass migration by African-Americans away from the rural south to the

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    Harlem Renaissance

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    during the transition from medieval times to modern times that is still taught today. There was, also, a not so well known renaissance that occurred in the United States from the 1920’s to the 1930’s in Manhattan. This renaissance was called “The New Negro Movement”, but was later called the Harlem Renaissance. During this time, there was an unprecedented outburst of creative activity among African-Americans that occurred in all fields of art. The renaissance started off as a series of literary discussions

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    The Harlem Renaissance, also known as “The New Negro Movement” was a cultural movement that spanned the1920’s. The Harlem Renaissance was a defining moment in African American literature causing an outburst of creative activity in black writers and artists in New York City. The Harlem Renaissance was influenced by the migration of African Americans from the South seeking better opportunities for themselves. A black man named Charles Spurgeon Johnson who was the editor for the National Urban League

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    during the Harlem Renaissance expressed their amazement with Harlem and its quick ability to receive immigrants from many different countries, who later thanked Harlem with influences of culture and identity. During the twenties and thirties, Harlem, New York was an entertainment melting pot that drew artists, poets, musicians, singers, and dancers to create a literary, musical, and cultural explosion which we now call, the Harlem

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    from a Life Made Out of Poetry. Poetry during the Harlem Renaissance was the way that African Americans made sense out of everything, good or bad, that “contextualized” their lives. The Harlem Renaissance, also known as the Black Renaissance or New Negro Movement, was a cultural movement among African Americans. It began roughly after the end of World War 1 in 1918. Blacks were considered second class citizens and were treated as such. Frustrated, African Americans moved North to escape Jim Crow

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    Aaron Douglas, The New Negro Movements

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    draw, paint or sculpt something so beautiful. According to historyoftheharlemrenaissance.weebly.com, "Between 1920-1930 and outburst of creativity among African American occurred in every aspect of art. This cultural movement became known as "the New Negro Movement" later the Harlem renaissance." The art today isn't really memorable but during that time it was, it expressed how the people in Harlem were feeling and they told a story through their artwork. All the different artists had different mediums

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    environmental influence of passing events. The discovery of the "New Negro" in the Harlem Renaissance marks the beginning of this essential philosophy contributing to the 1960’s Black Arts Movement and the Civil Rights Movement; continuing to be evident in current forms of black art, such as within the lyrics of hip-hop music. These revolutionary Ideals of reform have been voiced in the lyrics of many rappers of urban realism, like the New York M.C.’s Rakim, Run-D.M.C. and west coast rapper Tupac Shakur

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