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    Hitler: Old Ideas, New Meanings

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    Hitler: Old Ideas, New Meanings The second World War was a consequence of one man and his idealistic dream. Adolf Hitler strove to further the "Aryan" race at the expense of other people and cultures. However, for such an idealistic man, Hitler was fairly unoriginal. He borrowed the swastika, the main symbol used in the war to indicate Nazi rule, from ancient civilizations. Hitler also borrowed mythology from other cultures to promote his ideas. The swastika was far from being Hitler's own

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    New Meaning in a Brave New World The motto of the "Brave New World" was "Community, Identity, and Stability." In the following essay the actual meanings of these terms will be addressed. The term "Community" really did not have the meaning that we are accustomed to hearing and speaking in the modern day and age (1996). Instead it stands for almost a lack of "Community", meaning that there is no choice of where one ranks in the "Community", instead you are assigned even before production (natural

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    New Meaning to Broumas' Little Red Riding Hood There is more to Broumas' Little Red Riding Hood than meets the eye, or perhaps that is exactly where the analysis comes into play because the formalistic approach of analyzing literature consists of looking at a piece of literature and stating what is obviously there. The formalistic approach does give the work a deeper meaning than it first had, but the details are usually plain and easily noticeable. Generally they are very obvious, thus easily

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    Socrates once stated that " the unexamined life is not worth living" meaning that as individuals we all hold ethical beliefs and if we do not examined those beliefs we are unable to find our purpose, to think, to know ourselves and have an identity of our own. In other words, the meaning of life is about exploring ourselves and understanding the meaning of life that would eventually allow the individual to develop social conscious of the universe. Having the sense of freedom would allow the individual

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    Efficient America: Women, Progressivism, and the New Meaning of Citizenship The end of the 19th Century brought with it what Woodrow Wilson called, “a new sense of union,” a cease-fire in sectional political strife that ended a century-long conflict in the United States, but the effects of the Industrial Revolution were already ushering in a new kind of domestic debate. This one would be couched in much of the same rhetoric of rights and equality and freedom that characterized the previous conflict

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    Christmas at one time was, an annual church festival in memory of the birth of Christ. Now when the word Christmas is mentioned people think about lights, trees, presents, food, friends and family, along with the birth of Christ. Some view these added meanings as a good change and some view them as a bad change. In today’s world Christmas is not defined only as celebrating the birth of Christ but also the celebration of giving, and the celebration of family and friends. From Old English, Cristes

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    Sucks and Blows

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    to mean something other than what you will read in a dictionary, commonly referred to as slang. Classic examples of this throughout recent history is the word “bad” meaning good, or “sucks” implying bad, or “blows” also, oddly enough meaning bad. If it is not already evident slang almost never makes any matter of the original meaning of a word. One of the newest editions to the dictionary of slang can be heard walking down the hall of any school, college, or university. You will undoubtedly hear

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    and new meaning to the familiar syllables. Words resonate with prescribed meanings, whereas voice creates its own meaning and identity. In Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, voice comprises the primitive component of language, with words existing only as a secondary function of voice. Glimpsing a “primitive truth,” Kurtz’s voice and soul unite so that his knowledge speaks through his voice, rather than through his words. Alternately draining words of their meaning and filling them with new meaning, Kurtz’s

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    with, a poem that includes an interpretation as part of the poem, and it is therefore a poem that makes a problem of its meaning precisely by virtue of its apparent (and apparently inadequate) effort to explain itself. We cannot understand the poem without knowing what it meant to its author, but we must also assume that what the poem meant to its author will not be its meaning. The notes to The Waste Land are, by the logic of Eliot's philosophical critique of interpretation, simply another riddle--and

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    respect to the opinions of mankind, requires that Americans should recognize slang adopted into language. We hold these truths to be self-evident: that language is expression of thought, in the form of speech or written symbols, that have agreed-upon meanings. That, many large speaking languages contain dialects, or other versions of languages within a community, that are different in some aspects of grammar, pronunciation, or vocabulary. That, because language is a form of one’s own ideas and expression

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    Whitman's Interpretation of Emerson

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    Whitman's Interpretation of Emerson Walt Whitman was able to take the spark of an idea from Ralph Waldo Emerson and tend, nurture, and support it until the spark grew into a huge flame of something surprising and original - new American poetry. Whitman did not only learn from Emerson, but he also took Emerson's ideas and expanded them into something much more encompassing. Whitman was able to use Emerson's principles that are outlined in "The Poet" to springboard into something more expansive

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    different things to be symbolic. Dove and peace, a rose and love; they are simple things yet widely symbolic. Symbolism is commonly used in literature to change or deepen meanings or instill a different meaning to the mind of the readers. The reader is forced to think, make connections, and succeed in adding a new meaning to the novel. In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald uses symbolism in the form of his characters and to develop the theme, the corruption of the American Dream. All of the

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    Pride And Prejudice

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    universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a good wife". At first, readers would understand this in one way. However, in the second half of the novel it takes on a whole new meaning. At first this sentence takes on an ironic meaning, because it is commonly understood that it is the woman who is in pursuit of a wealthy gentleman (and not the man pursuing the woman as stated). Austin also seems to prove this understanding of the quotation in the first

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    application of the principle of complexity. T S Eliot uses a parallel structure on the surface to develop an ironic contrast, and then uses surface contrasts in a parallel form. To the reader, this gives the effect of chaotic experience ordered into a new whole, though the realistic surface of experience is faithfully retained. The fortune-telling of "The Burial of the Dead" will illustrate the general method very satisfactorily. On the surface of the poem the poet reproduces the patter of the charlatan

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    Fractal Geometry

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    abstract. Complex and imaginary numbers, real numbers, logarithms, functions, some tangible and others imperceivable. But these abstract numbers, simply symbols that conjure an image, a quantity, in our mind, and complex equations, take on a new meaning with fractals - a concrete one. Fractals go from being very simple equations on a piece of paper to colorful, extraordinary images, and most of all, offer an explanation to things. The importance of fractal geometry is that it provides an

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    Magical Realism

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    writers of this mode include Alejo Carpentier, Jorge Luis Borges, Isabel Allende, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Octavio Paz, Pablo Neruda, and Majorie Agosin. At the same time there are many writers of the genre world wide, though every form may take one new meaning. The magical realist does not depend on the natural or physical laws or on the usual conception of the real in Western culture, and at the same time it uses these aspects to disrupt reality, to create a disproportionate view (Zamora 146-148). While

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    Seeking Harmony as a World Citizen "Excuse me, do you speak German?" - outside of that church's organ recital in Bonn, Germany, the distinct Japanese accent caught me by surprise. My weeks of study and internship gave me new confidence, so I answered, "Yes, yes I do." The Japanese woman's companion, seeing my nod, immediately began to overflow with German praises. I looked at her, elderly, in a wheelchair, and she told me the story: that music-loving Japanese woman pushed that music-loving

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    The Style of Writing

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    The Style of Writing According to the Webster’s New World Dictionary, the definition of style is “a characteristic manner of expression”(612). Usually words such as personal, individual, and unique also come to mind when we think of writing style. I have always associated writing style with belonging uniquely to one individual, meaning that everyone had his or her own style. After reading, “Style Toward Clarity and Grace” by Joseph Williams and “The Elements of Style” by William Strunk and

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    United States of America

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    topics—geography, people, culture, economy, government, and history—comprise the interrelated elements of the nation’s experience. Geography is the first element because landforms, resources, and climate affected how people who came to the United States formed new societies. People, in all their variety, are the second element because they formed communities and built a society. The next three elements are major parts of that society—its culture, economy, and government. History tells the story of how people

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    Martin Luther King Jr

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    Basically, this term has a religious connotation which is a task set by God. However, gradually this term was expanded to the point where it covered many of man's activities. During the Protestant Reformation, the term "calling" started to take on a new meaning. Fulfilling one's duty in worldly affairs became a task of extreme importance. gradually, fulfilling one's duty was not only important but it became the moral obligation of every individual (the highest form of moral activity). Before the Reformation

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