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    New Law

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    CBS) Attorney General John Ashcroft denounced Tuesday's Supreme Court ruling that overturned a law banning computer simulations and other fool-the-eye depictions of teen-agers or children having sex, saying it would make prosecutions more difficult. Where possible, he said, the Justice Department will restructure prosecutions it has brought to pursue "general obscenity charges against those who have victimized children." Child pornographers "will find little refuge" in the decision, he said. "We

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    information age. In contrast, the U.S. Constitution and most of our common law was written when people lived in an agrarian economy prior to 1850. Law has been slow to adapt to the choices posed by technology. While I believe that knowledge, opportunities, and choices are inherently Good, there are the possibilities of (1) prohibiting or restricting use of new technologies for no good reason or (2) of misusing technology to harm people. Law that made sense in 1850, or even in 1950, can be inappropriate for

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    New Zealand courts should use international law to develop the common law, where there is a lack of understanding in specific areas. Through an increasingly global world, New Zealand is able to compare its own laws with other jurisdictions when attempting to create new common law. Furthermore, international law can aid courts in interpreting certain laws when there is a gap in New Zealand law. Rather than beginning with nothing, international law to offers us a framework for approaching novel situations

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    "The New Terrain of International Law Reaction Paper " The author in this paper is presenting the new style of international courts. The new international judicial architecture that review administrative decisions validity, asses state compliance with international law, influence international and domestic politics, serving as a regulative role of creating guidelines and setting expectations and allowing private parties to seek remedies with international legal bodies. The authors theory is that

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    everyone is worth his (or her) salt”: Mao Zedong’s New Marriage Law What is Mao Zedong’s New Marriage Law? Mao Zedong’s New Marriage law was a civil marriage law which provided civil registry for legal marriages. At one level the after-Mao growth in the corpus of family law has a fairly clear meaning. The 1950 Marriage Law and the system of family law which it tried to put into place were important elements in the generation of political support for the new government in power. However, inthe after-Mao

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    current New Zealand legal system, there is no written constitution. Various elements including the Constitution Act 1986, the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 and the Treaty of Waitangi help to build our constitution. It is not in one supreme law document but instead is formed by a range of constitutional conventions, acts and documents . The three branches that make up New Zealand’s constitution are the legislature, the executive and the judiciary which are examined heavily within New Zealand’s

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    Catherine the Great, reigned over Russia with the ideas of Enlightenment. These ideas are best seen in her attempt at a new law code, the Nakaz. From reading the Nakaz, someone can see that Catherine saw the Enlightenment ideas of natural law, freedom, and liberty as the most important. The new law code was created not only to enforce the enlightenment ideas, but also to have a more concise law code for the people of Russia. Catherine argued that a trend towards Enlightenment of government would help connect

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    Victoria's New Defense to Homicide Laws

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    I INTRODUCTION Since the abolishment of provocation, Victoria’s defensive homicide laws have been viewed as more equal and accessible. Although they are criticized in some aspects, the defensive homicide laws that New South Wales hold are viewed as outdated and gender-bias, therefore leading to the conclusion that Victoria should retain its current law, instead of favoring that in NSW. II DEFENCES TO HOMICIDE IN VICTORIA: PRIOR TO 2005 Prior to 2005, Victoria and NSW shared similar defences to

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    Create five (5) laws needed by the group stranded in Agawa Canyon. The five laws needed by the group stranded in Agawa Canyon to survive until they are rescued are: 1. The decisions of the group is governed by a vote, majority of the votes wins the dispute. If in any case there should be an even number of votes on both sides of the decision, a conference is held where all members must speak their mind on why the decision they chose is correct. If the decision remains at a 50/50 vote, 2. Food,

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    supreme law constitution enforced by the judiciary would enhance the judiciary’s present role and powers. The judiciary’s ability to check on other branches of government will be expanded to stabilize the rule of law and separation of powers. In this essay, the difference between a supreme law constitution environment and New Zealand’s current legal environment will be contrasted, in context to New Zealand judiciary’s role and power, and how the supreme law constitution will cope in New Zealand’s

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    She first presented her insights with an elaborate historical background of how, a century later, the Jim Crow Laws are still present in our society. Alexander introduces us to the Cotton family who were denied their right to participate in the American electoral democracy on not only one or two occasion, but on several occasions. Alexander suggests that this denial

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    conflicted attitudes that the public and politics have towards illegal immigrants. The current Immigration Law disadvantages mexican immigrant families by deporting parents, forcing them to leave their children behind. In order to fix the problem we must establish a new immigration law that protects families by giving them amnesty. At an early stage the law presented concerns which constantly required new reform. During the 18th and early 19th centuries, Americans encouraged free and open immigration until

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    Since the mid 1980’s there has been a paradigm shift in law enforcement from the military policing model to the community oriented policing model (Breci & Erickson, 1998; Pliant, 1998; Rosenbaum & Yeh, 1994; Thayer & Reynolds, 1997; Varricchio, 1998). In the military model, police react to events in the community (Thayer & Reynolds, 1997). Community problems filter up the chain of command and solutions filter their way back down. Police respond when a crime is committed. There is little contact with

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    On January 3, 1973 Governor Nelson R. Rockefeller first proposed to create new drug laws that would help fight the current war on drugs that was taking over New York City. Rockefeller proposed to sentence anyone who committed a level A-1 felony, which is the highest level, would be sentence to minimum 15 years to life in prison. There was much controversy on these laws. Some were happy that a stand was finally being made; they wanted the streets to be cleaned of drugs. Others saw it as a racism tactic

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    The laws known as “Jim Crow” were laws presented to basically establish racial apartheid in the United States. These laws were more than in effect for “for three centuries of a century beginning in the 1800s” according to a Jim Crow Law article on PBS. Many try to say these laws didn’t have that big of an effect on African American lives but in affected almost everything in their daily life from segregation of things: such as schools, parks, restrooms, libraries, bus seatings, and also restaurants

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    Jim Crow laws were laws created to strengthen racism and segregation. It was a white person’s desperate attempt to maintain a sort of superiority over black people. Nowadays it might seem impossible for laws promoting racism and segregation to exist, but they do. Concealed by inconspicuous phrasing there are still laws to this day that allow blacks and other minorities to be taken advantage of solely based on their race. The book written by Michelle Alexander titled The New Jim Crow outlines the

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    Provisions of New York State Law Regarding Child Labor Current provisions of New York State employment laws have taken actions to protect the working conditions of children. These necessary actions should further prevent any mistreatment of child laborers from recurring, as it did at the time of the Industrial Revolution. The dire conditions under which many children were forced to work were hazardous to their health and emotional well-being. As early as the age of 5, children tended the

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    effect was the most evident in New Orleans, Louisiana. From police officers to the court systems in New Orleans Hurricane Katrina caused travesties of justice throughout the city affecting all of the residents who relied and counted on their government to uphold their safety and rights. The Law and Order system relies on police officers, prosecutors, and many more to uphold the standards and rights citizens expect from the United States government. The New Orleans’ Law and Order system proved to be

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    The New Bankruptcy Law

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    be the new start in life that they desperately needed. Unfortunately, bankruptcy has also served as a crutch to many as well, allowing them to relinquish debt that they were completely capable, however selfishly unwilling, to pay. As with any law, or policy, Americans are forced to accept the good with the bad, choosing which outweighs the other. In an effort to combat the increasingly growing abuse of the bankruptcy laws in our system today President George Bush has signed into law a new bill that

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    The New Jim Crow Laws

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    and prejudices restricted the civil rights and liberties of African Americans. Following the civil war during the reconstruction period, Jim Crow laws enforced racial segregation in all public facilities in what once was the Confederate States of America. These laws shaped the United States for years to come and according to Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow have created a modern day social caste system, one where African Americans are restrained in a limited position in the social hierarchy.

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