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    New Journalism

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    Inverted pyramid. Unbiased news gathering. Objectivity in reporting. Professionalism. Routines that would regulate news reports, translating information to readers, regardless of geography. Journalism spent the better part of the 20th century routinizing the news, attempting to shed its seedy past of “yellow journalism” amid the challenges of new technologies, first the radio, followed by the television. Then came the tumultuous 1950s and 1960s. Suddenly, the same tides of changes that were sweeping

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    ‘New Media, Old News: Journalism and Democracy in the Digital Age’ is a book of essays written by authors James Curran, Des Freedman, Angela Phillips, Nick Couldry, Peter Lee-Wright, Tamara Witschge, Aeron Davis, Joanna Redden, Rodney Benson and Natalie Fenton, who also edited the book. These essays are based on a large scale multi-year investigation into the journalistic practices of news organisations in the present day where the internet has made access to news instantaneous and the competition

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    way citizens receive news has improved as well. Thanks to the invention, News-O-Gram (a word modified from “hologram”), news is instantly delivered to News-O-Stands everywhere. No longer are there paper newspaper stands but rather, sleek and innovative News-O-Stands. Composed of holographic technology, this tiny but sturdy machine is able to virtually give news, all in the form of a 3D newscaster. History of Holography and the Hologram/How It Relates to the Invention of News-O-Grams/Stands Holography

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    disillusioned with Freudian psychology. He was then fired after he tried advancing his own theories (Masson v. New Yorker Magazine, 1991). Janet Malcolm, an author and contributor to New Yorker Magazine, recorded many interviews with Masson and wrote an article containing many lengthy quotes about his relationship with the Sigmund Freud Archives (Masson v. New Yorker Magazine, 1991). Masson had warned New Yorker Magazine’s fact checker Nancy Franklin about many inaccuracies, but the article was published anyway

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    Final

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    1960s and 1970s can be seen as the birth time of literary journalism. Literary journalism uses literary techniques, which was unheard of at the time. During this time frame the work Tom Wolfe coined “New Journalism” in a 1973 collection of journalism articles he published as The New Journalism. The New Journalism included works by Tom Wolfe himself, Truman Capote, Norman Mailer, and Gay Talese. The 1960s and 1970s was when literary journalism was most important. The 1960s and 1970s was a time of drastic

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    plan, and we-- the students. It is sometimes blunt, sometimes ugly, and in Truman Capote’s case, is sometimes so gruesome that we do not dare forget it. With the novels publication in the 1960s, a new genre called ‘New Journalism’ had begun to surface; it sought to combine the elements of journalism with the elements of fiction and in doing so it sought to challenge the readers mo... ... middle of paper ... ...e who speaks not on their own but with a collective voice, that is completely omnipresent

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    Citizen Journalism

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    Joan Cornell notes that the Internet democratizes the journalism which was in the hand of the few people (2003). The Internet makes the public access to information; at the same time, it creates the public to be journalists, opening blogs to put something new around on the Internet. Many news websites like The Guardian, the Washington Post, CNN and MSNBC allows some personification. The journalism nowadays is facing challenges not only from media and technology convergence, but also from audience

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    What are the risk and opportunities of citizen journalism? Introduction: The political domain is another area where social media is creating both opportunities and risk for society. The only way to access to news are used to be through mainstream media such as television, newspaper and radio in the old days. But that condition has changed by the internet age. The Traditional journalism is facing a tough time because of the 'social media ' became the most used source, mainstream

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    No matter what networked journalism is, conventional media organization should transform the way of operating workflows as well as gathering, distributing information. Basically, the more audiences participate in generating contents, the more transparency and the more equality of information will be given to grass roots. The boundaries of journalism will be expended from only to professional journalists or journalism scholars to ordinary audiences. However, one thing what

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    has changed journalism in a lot of ways over the past 20 years. The most important and obvious change is that now journalism is reaching a wider audience other than just the audiences that comes from digital space, for example Facebook and Twitter, as the second quarter of 2015, Facebook had 1.49 billion monthly active users and Twitter has reached 304 million users, all these users may or may not be aware that they are involved in journalism one way or the other. 20 years ago, journalism was all about

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    A Career in Journalism

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    Journalism is type of writing that investigates and includes lots of research of good and bad stories and some events. Journalists tend to write news stories that people should know about and haven’t already heard. Journalism comes in different categories; some are reporters, writers, editors, and photographers. People who tend to like journalism are those who love language and enjoying writing and reading, are called journalist; they work as reporters at newspapers, magazines, websites, TV stations

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    Independence and impartiality in journalism have always been a significant principle in measuring the quality of journalistic materials. Impartiality requires neutral and unbiased coverage of the events. It means that the journalist must report only the facts and not a personal beliefs and emotions toward the facts. According to this standard, being objective means to present different sides of an argument and maintain a balance of viewpoints, avoiding manipulation of the audience. Author and former

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    Journalism

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    Before there were newspapers, news was taken by horse from town to town; neighbors and friends had to rely on each other for information. Now journalism is one of the fastest most competitively growing job markets and with college students clamoring for internships at vogue and rolling stone it’s difficult to get your foot in the door. Being a reporter isn’t a nine to five job with a normal salary and a weekly pay check its being stressed over deadlines and spending hours on the phone checking sources

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    The importance of journalism has always been defined by the inherent value of information. To possess information is to possess power, and without it a society can effectively be rendered mute. The essential functions of a journalist, to be both the watchdogs of the elite and the providers of factual and unbiased reporting to the public, have begun to decline in recent decades. Although the news is integral to the fabric of democracy, the current market imperatives of sustaining a profitable business

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    The Lies Behind the Smiles

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    ... ...Notes Impact of Citizen Journalism." Voice of America 29 04 2011, n. pag. Web. 30 Nov. 2013 "Journalism Ethics and Self- Regulation in Europe: New Media, Old Dilemma." UNESCO. UNESCO. Web. 30 Nov 2013. (Source 8) "Journalists Screened by Military." St Louis Journalism Review. St Louis Journalism Review, n.d. Web. 30 Nov 2013.(Source 6) Lazaroiu, George. "Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences." The language of Journalism Ethics. Institute of Interdisciplinary

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    Nowadays the world is being bombarded by news at every second and most of the population can access them through newspapers, websites, radio or TV. There are indeed different way and different kind of journalism but it can only be either good or bad. Journalism itself is the act of gathering news and do research in order to inform society about matters concerning various topics. It has changed a lot since its diffusion and innovative ways of making news are constantly being explored, also because

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    film, Page One: Inside The New York Times, the inner world of journalism is revealed through journalists David Carr and Brian Stelter as the newspaper company The New York Times, struggles to keep alive within a new wave of news journalism. The film is dedicated to reveal the true inner mechanics of what modern day new journalists face on a daily basis and leaves the audience almost in a state of shock. It broadcasts news journalism as yes, an old school method of news generation, but it also highlights

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    In 1960s, literary journalism emerged as a new hybrid genre that combines the best practices of both fact and fiction, journalism and literature. The emerging genre is marked by the publication of two non-fictional books written by Truman Capote and Norman Mailer; namely In Cold Blood (1965) and The Armies of the Night (1968) respectively. At the same year of its publication, Mailer’s book has been awarded the Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction. Since then, it has been the focus of a cornucopia of critical

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    The Middle East: Conflict in Journalism

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    The Middle East: Conflict in Journalism Before beginning my essay, “The Middle East, Conflict in Journalism”, I would like the reader to read a few terms. These are merely food for thought, do whatever with them you wish. Conflict: A state of disharmony between incompatible or antithetical persons, ideas, or interests; a clash. (The American Heritage) War: A state of open, armed, often prolonged conflict carried on between nations, states, or parties. &The period of such conflict.

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    Journalism

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    Journalism has become a job carrying enormous personal rewards. Indeed, it is difficult, chalenging (e.g. physically, emotionally, ethically, politically), yet again - it is fun. Journalism requires mastering a multiple range of knowledge and skills (Hicks: 2008; Brighton: 2007; Randall: 2007). This essay has the task to identify the key sources and methods I have used gathering information for my 332MC News and Features (aka. 332MC) articles portfolio, as well as give a comment to what I have

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