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    Hitler: Old Ideas, New Meanings

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    Hitler: Old Ideas, New Meanings The second World War was a consequence of one man and his idealistic dream. Adolf Hitler strove to further the "Aryan" race at the expense of other people and cultures. However, for such an idealistic man, Hitler was fairly unoriginal. He borrowed the swastika, the main symbol used in the war to indicate Nazi rule, from ancient civilizations. Hitler also borrowed mythology from other cultures to promote his ideas. The swastika was far from being Hitler's own

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    New Ideas

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    During the nineteenth and the twenty centuries musicians adopted new rules. Some of the rules would be not to follow rules or some composers would follow the rule that required them to return to emotional restrains. Whether it was the Impressionistic composer Claude Debussy performing La Mer or the Neoclassical composer Igor Stravinsky performing The Rite of Spring, the composers of this time period certainly had noteworthy ideas. “I love music passionately. And because I love it I try to free

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    Brave New World: Idea of the Future

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    Imagine a life of luxury and happiness. Sounds like a dream . . . but what if it was reality. Aldous Huxley's novel Brave New World explains how society turns into a dystopian future. He shows a world where humans are developed and controlled in means of stability. Aldous Huxley was raised in a family well-known for their intellectual and scientific achievements (Magill 952 -956). Therefore, he became a genius and even a prodigy for being brilliant and creative (Napierkowski and Stanley 32-34). He

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    The New Idea of Modernism

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    In the time after World War One a new way of thinking became prominent. This new idea is what we call Modernism. After the war it was realized that many people had suffered absolute horrors, ones that they never could have imagined, or ever forget. The violence and pain witnessed by so many left them psychologically shell-shocked, and filled with disillusionment. These psychological effects would soon alter the world for years to come, and lead many to a loss in faith and questioning of everything

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    The characters in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World represent certain political and social ideas. Huxley used what he saw in the world in which he lived to form his book. From what he saw, he imagined that life was heading in a direction of a utopian government control. Huxley did not imagine this as a good thing. He uses the characters of Brave New World to express his view of utopia being impossible and detrimental. One such character he uses to represent the idealogy behind this is Bernard

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    French Revolution

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    French Revolution A historian once wrote that all revolutions need ideas to fuel them. Can this assertion be applied to the French Revolution? Yes, new ideas are the root to any revolution because new ideas are needed to change old ways. The dictionary states that a revolution is: A sudden or momentous change in a situation. In this case the situation would be political and social reform. Some of the ideas that lead to the revolution are; a change from a monarchy to a democracy, religious tolerance

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    have in common is that they are ever-changing. The ideas of modernity and postmodernity are always changing along with time, as are the flows of globalization. I think the three terms are ever-changing because they are affected by the world we live in, which is always changing. Since the world is always changing, what is considered "modern" will never stay the same. Everyday new ideas are being thought, knowledge is being created, and new relationships are formed. As long as time keeps changing

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    Shakespeare, Stephen King, or John Grisham. It would take enormous amounts of time, practice, and effort to be considered a long shot at a Pulitzer Prize. Yet, I intend to progress my writing by setting more achievable goals, building on new ideas, and developing new skills. Also, I will use the advice of instructors and peers, and draw from previous writing experiences to mold this and future writing experiences. When I sit down to write, I must do so in a clean, well-organized, and well-lit area.

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    Globalization: Germany and the European Union

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    communist East Germany. West Germany flourished while East Germany struggled to breathe under the heavy shadow of the Soviet Union. In 1990, after the Berlin Wall fell, Germany finally became one again with the union of East and West Germany. This new united Germany had many problems to overcome. Many in West Germany questioned the move, West Germany was enjoying prosperity, politically and economically, and why should they risk it all for unification? East Germany was left in social and economic

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    Transformation of London in the 1790s

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    Transformation of London in the 1790s Many changes were occurring in London during the 1790s. New ideas were emerging within England and around the world. The onset of the French Revolution contributed greatly to the unrest and the turmoil of the times. As the English citizens responded to both internal and external affairs, religious movements, social and political reform parties, and governmental reactions gained momentum. In addition, many writers responded and contributed to the progressive

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