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    The Vagina Monologues

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    with whether it is humorous, tragic or disturbing. Including sex, rape, menstruation, masturbation, orgasm, even the comfort level women have with their own body. Some have stated that The Vagina Monologues has been celebrated as the bible for a new generation of women. I would have to agree with such a statement. Yes, in part this was meant to be funny and connect with women all over but it is also meant to let women know that have been abused and raped that it is not ok but everything will be ok.

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    A Rose for Emily

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    he compared their ability and inability to change with the time. The old or “Antebellum South” was represented by the characters Miss Emily, Colonel Sartoris, the Board of Aldermen, and the Negro servant. The new or “Modern South” was expressed through the words of the unnamed narrator, the new Board of Aldermen, Homer Barron, and the townspeople. In the shocking story, “A Rose for Emily,” Faulkner used symbolism and a unique narrative perspective to describe Miss Emily’s inner struggles to accept

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    racism

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    publicly notarized as the aforementioned. Most of these feelings towards another of a different skin color are deeply rooted in our minds from previous generations. Many, many years ago, African-Americans were used as slaves. The slave owners treated them badly. The owner’s own children then grew up with the same ideals and passed them on to the new generation. Through the years, people have spoken out about these ill-conceived ideas making the ominous threat of racism more discreet than ever before. While

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    The 1960s

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    the youthful generation into a powerful strong-minded group of people known as the hippies. Around the late '60s, there was a copious amount of young men and women who were just reaching their late teen years, re-evaluating their sentiment on important issues. But just what was a hippie? Hippies were mostly young people who were often characterized by long hair and flowing skirts. They had very confident convictions, particularly in regard to the Vietnam War. Because this new generation possessed a

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    first steps in computer programming by creating simple programs. Here, the assistance of useful software is necessary. The computer software has many applications in the real world and is found virtually everywhere. The new generation of very fast computers introduces us to a new type of software. Multimedia is a of computer program that not only delivers written data for the user, but also provides visual support of the topic. By exploring the influence of multimedia upon high school students. I

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    gender issues in jails

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    The article I chose is titled Gender Issues in the New Generation Jail, by Patrick G. Jackson, and Cindy A. Stearns. The source for this article is the Prison Journal. The article explains how men and women in the new jails have adapted. The definition of the new jail is a fifty-person pod style jail. The old jail was considered to be inhumane, disgusting, and have many blind spots. The problems in the old jails were growing year by year. The new jail comes furnished with televisions, separate showers

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    Conscious Propaganda Almost every single original concept today has become mainstream or shows a general trend towards becoming so. Propagandists realize this and often exploit these ideas, tainting their flavor of originality and creating a new generation of gullible “wannabes” who can partly adhere to any philosophy, but do not allow themselves to be inconveniences by certain doctrines. Anything that might elicit followers or have the potential to, has drawn the attention of these solicitor, yet

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    The Digital Divide

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    The Digital Divide A new generation is forming the way its members will be written into history books. These are the members of the digital culture, a lifestyle relying on the use of technology and the Internet as a tool of communication and information-sharing. Nevertheless, as with the generations of the past, some individuals are not participating in this new cultural experience. It is common knowledge that some citizens do not use the Internet. Many do not use the Internet simply due

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    Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily,” illustrates the evolution of a small, post-Civil War community, as the new generation of inhabitants replaces the pre-Civil War ideals with more modern ideas. At the center of the town is Emily Grierson, the only remaining remnant of the upper class Grierson family, a “Southern gentlewoman unable to understand how much the world has changed around her.” (Kazin, 2). This essay will focus on Emily Grierson and her attempts to control change after her father’s death

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    White and New vs. Old in Go Down, Moses In the novel Go Down, Moses, William Faulkner examines the relationship between blacks and whites in the South. His attempt to trace the evolution of the roles and mentalities of whites and blacks from the emancipation to the 1940s focuses on several key transitional figures. In "The Fire and the Hearth," Lucas Beauchamp specifically represents two extremes of pride: in the old people, who were proud of their land and their traditions; and in the new generation

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