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    The new Frontier

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    Question #4 Section 1 Dusty trails, wagon trains, and tough guys on horses, the images that come to most peoples mind when they think of the migration towards the western frontiers. Today we are able to see the obvious effects that this migration has left on our society even today; (Sunny and warm Phoenix, hip coffee from Seattle, and that strange utopia of its own, California) but what are some of the not so obvious effects that it left? The late 1800’s was a time of many great opportunities and

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    The Womb: The New Scientific Frontier?

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    The Womb: The New Scientific Frontier? In 1967 James Conniff, a reporter for the New York Times Magazine, wrote that the womb was the new frontier of science (Maynard-Moody, 1995). His article, and a smattering of other voices uncomfortable with fetal research, were a foreshadow of the great political and social controversy over the use of fetuses in scientific research. Prior to the Supreme Court's ruling in Roe vs. Wade in 1973, fetal research went on relatively peacefully without any protests

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    Analysis of Debating Democracy's "The Media: Vast Wasteland or New Frontier?" In Debating Democracy's "The Media: Vast Wasteland or New Frontier?" Jarol Manheim and Douglas Rushkoff present opposing views of the media. Both authors raise the questions of what the media represents and what messages the media tries to send to the public. Is the media's coverage of events just for entertainment value or do the reports have political content and value? Are the viewers capable of distinguishing between

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    The New Frontier

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    he attempted to make several reforms, supported by his “New Frontier” legislature. The goals of the New Frontier were to improve school funding, civil rights, and foreign policy. The New Frontier was to make the American population feel as if no frontier was impossible to achieve, including the controversial final frontier of space. Despite the fact that many of his acts and bills were not passed or supported by Congress, the New Frontier was what led to many of the greatest advancements which helped

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    The New Frontier of Automobiles

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    The New Frontier of Automobiles Machines running, hammers dropping, and drills drilling are the sounds of Henry Ford’s revolutionary assembly line. Henry Ford grew up in the late eighteenth century during the industrial revolution. There were no electric lights, only gas lamps and candles. Horses and trains were the only cost effective way of transportation for the public. When Henry Ford was a child, he saw a steam driven car on the road and was mesmerized. At this point, he knew he longed to become

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    Gold Rush Paper

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    early in the Gold Rush, crime was rare, but as the stakes rose and the easily panned gold dwindled, robbery and murder became a part of life on the frontier. The "West" consisted of outlaws, gunfighters, lawmen, whores, and vigilantes. There are many stories on how the "West" begun and what persuaded people to come and explore the new frontier, but here, today, we are going to investigate those stories and seek to find what is fact or what is fiction. These stories will send you galloping

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    comprehend the similarities and differences between John F. Kennedy’s “New Frontier” and Lyndon B. Johnson’s “Great Society” you must understand their intentions first. John F. Kennedy was not an ordinary President. He was one with a certain “charisma”, as some put it. He was very blunt and knew how to get what he wanted. During his rain as President, he created the reform program know as the “New Frontier”. The New Frontier was developed to assure Americans of the upcoming sixties’ challenges. This

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    I Need New Frontiers

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    A creek is no place for shoes. I think it' s unreasonable to ask children to keep their shoes on in such a place. My bare feet were always covered with calluses from walking down the rough pavement of Peardale Street and around the corner, past the weeping willows, but not as far as the Lindsay' s squeaky old swing-set. It was hard to see from the road, and as far as I could tell, nobody ever went there- except for me. Large pines nearby stood tall and erect, looking down at the ripples and currents

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    The Down to Earth Challenges of Space Exploration Humans have dreamed of leaving the earth and traveling space for many years, and up to this day they have taken many steps in the right direction. Yet, with every new frontier they approach, new problems loom over the horizon. All problems involved with space exploration may not directly involve space itself. Many of those problems surface right here on Earth. Some of the easier issues have been resolved, such as escaping the forces of gravity

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    Kennedy’s New Frontier Program

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    Kennedy’s New Frontier Program As the President elect of the United States in 1960, John F. Kennedy aspired, to accomplish much during his presidency. Kennedy confidently called his initiatives “The New Frontier” taking on numerous major challenges. Some of the challenges were boosting the United States economy by ending a recession and promoting growth in the economy, aiding third world countries by establishing the Peace Corps sending men and women overseas to assist developing countries in meeting

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