Free Neuropathology Essays and Papers

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Free Neuropathology Essays and Papers

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    AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is a disease of an individual’s immune system caused by HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus 1). HIV-1 is a retrovirus of the lentivirus subfamily. This virus is atypical in that it does not require mitotically active cells to reproduce. Reproduction of the viral nucleic acids occurs in the nucleus of infected cells. Until recently it was believed that AIDS related deaths as a result of HIV infection were caused primarily by opportunistic infections, usually

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    Neuropathology of AIDS

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    Neuropathology of AIDS Since its discovery in 1981, AIDS has mainly been characterized as a disease effecting the bodying immune system. It has been recognized, however, that there are distinct neurological pathologies associated with the disease. AIDS neuropathology can be characterized by the existence of subcortical dementia, motor difficulties, and affective disorders. Most AIDS patients experience dementia of one form or another. It has been observed that approximately 95% of AIDS patients

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    Neuropathology Of Down's Syndrome

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    Neuropathology Of Down's Syndrome Down’s syndrome is the most commonly identified cause of mental retardation occurring in 1 out of 700 live births. In addition to mental deficiency, characteristics of the disease include epicanthic folds of the eyes, flattened facial features, unusual palm creases, short stature, open mouth, protruding tongue and poor posture. A twenty-two to fifty fold increase in risk of the development of leukemia along with congenital heart defects in forty percent of these

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    Gangliosidosis: A Brief Review Of Associated Neuropathology Gangliosidosis is a lysosomal storage disease which affects primarily the nervous system. This disease is the result of an autosomal recessive mutation which causes a lack or deficiency of an enzyme important in the metabolism of gangliosides. This deficient enzyme can vary depending on the type of mutation present causing either GM1 or GM2 gangliosidosis. Each of these will be discussed later, although the overall effects are similar

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    Understanding Stroke

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    management an essential element of public health education. Previous researchers have found that between 14% and 40% of adults cannot name a single risk factor associated with stroke. This is reason for concern among the medical community. Neuropathology/Neurochemically speaking Ischaemic str... ... middle of paper ... ...rain. Glutamate antagonists have been successful in treating various animal models of epilepsy and by effectively protecting against epilepsy brain damage. Works Cited

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    Tourette's Syndrome and the

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    or affect the function of their self. This can imply that what ever is causing the symptoms of Tourette's is subsequently affecting the part of the nervous system that controls the self and the "I" function. Most of the studies done on the neuropathology of Tourette's syndrome (TS) have been focus on the basal ganglia, a group of nuclei located mostly in the diencephelon of the brain, a region beneath the cortex. This area has been classically associated with involuntary movement and tic disorders

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    Discuss Some Of The Main Ideas

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    theory of neurosis, Freud founded and developed psychoanalysis into a general psychology, which became widely accepted as the predominant mode of discussing personality, behaviour and interpersonal relationships. Freud, who had been studying neuropathology, left Vienna in 1885 to continue his studies in Paris under the guidance of Jean Martin Charcot. This proved to be the turning point in his career, for Charcot’s work with patients classified as “hysterics” introduced Freud to the possibility

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    Understanding Parkinson's Disease Diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease To date, there are no specific diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's Disease. Diagnosis can only be made by an expert examination after the person has already developed symptoms. Biochemical measures can be used such as a screening strategy monitoring the dopamine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. Otherwise, specifically 6(18F)dopa positron emission tomography can be used for a direct measurement of dopamine activity. Using a

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    The Link Between Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease The individuals with Disabilities Education Act states that "all children with disabilities, including mental retardation, be educated to the maximum extent appropriate with students who are not disabled" (2). In an ideal world, society would have no problem following this decree, but the world is less than perfect and, therefore, stigmas are unfortunately attached to those suffering from mental disabilities, especially the mentally retarded

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    Physical Brain Abnormality a Possible Cause of Schizophrenia Neuropathologists have been researching schizophrenia for approximately a hundred years. But, even with a hundred years of research, the neuropathology of schizophrenia is still obscure. Although scientists have come a long way since the beginning of research, when they first believed that it was a "functional" psychosis, a disorder with no structural basis," the cause of the chronic disease remains a mystery" (1). However, with technological

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