Free Neurological Essays and Papers

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Free Neurological Essays and Papers

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    Functionalism

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    Functionalism agrees that brain states are responsible for mental states, but disagrees that they are identical with them. To do this, functionalists argue that neurological states or brain activity help to realize mental states, which then lead to behavior. This argument proposes that brain states are "low level" activities that help realize "high level" mental states. To help understand this idea I will use the usual Functionalist example of a computer. Imagine that you ask a computer to add the

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    Autism

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    afflicted with autism. Autism has mystified scientists and doctors for more than a century. So, what do we know about it now? It is a complex developmental disability that usually appears during the first three years of life, and it arises from a neurological disorder that affects the functioning of the brain. The brainstem of a person with autism is shorter than a normal brainstem, lacks a structure known as the superior olive and has a smaller than normal structure known as the facial nucleus. Scientists

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    Treatment For Neurological Disroders

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    Alzheimer's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease, and Tay-Sachs disease are all neurological disorders that affect the brain or spinal cord. The diseases above affect many Americans, but not one of the mentioned diseases has a cure. The diseases only have treatments that can help the patient with their symptoms and/or the treatments may slow the progression of the disease. According to The Alzheimer's Association, "Alzheimer's disease is the 6th leading cause of death

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    Epilepsy: A Neurological Disorder

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    whom have recovered as a child for over 20 years, just to have it reoccur at an older age, from medication side effects or during pregnancy and childbirth. So, what is epilepsy? According to Mayo Clinic staff on mayoclinic.com, Epilepsy is a “neurological disorder” that is also described as seizures. A seizure occurs when something disturbs the nerve cell activity in one’s brain, which can lead to convulsions, tremors or spasms (twitching of the arms and legs). This means that the brain’s neurons

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    The Hysteria Over Conversion Disorder

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    The Hysteria Over Conversion Disorder Scientists in fields connected to neurobiology and psychiatry remain mystified about the cause of Conversion Disorder. The disorder is characterized by physical symptoms of a neurological disorder, yet no direct problem can be found in the nervous system or other related systems of the body. This fact alone is not unusual; many diseases and symptoms have unknown origins. Conversion Disorder, however, seems to stem from "trivial" to traumatic psychological

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    What Makes Them Tic?

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    What Makes Them Tic? Tourette's syndrome is a neurological disorder, which involves involuntary body movements or Tics. There are two types of Tics, motor/physical and vocal. This paper will cover many aspects of Tourette's syndrome; including the history of the disease, the discovered of the disease, the genetics involved with the disorder, the diagnosis of the disease, and the effects of the disease on families. George Gils de la Tourette's a French doctor and biologist discovered Tourette's

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    Schizophrenia is a neurological disorder that affects the cognitive functions of an individual. The cause of this illness is unknown, but there are several theories of how an individual may acquire schizophrenia. Because there are many symptoms of the disease and because the symptoms can vary quite dramatically among several individuals and even within the same individual over time, the diagnosis of schizophrenia can be quite difficult. In the United States and Europe, schizophrenia occurs in

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    Neurological Sports Injuries

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    Horror story of sports injuries begins with a young man by the name of Austin Trenum. He was only 17-years-old when misery struck him while playing a football game. Austin’s final play left him with a serious concussion. He got up from the play showing no signs of a brain injury. Austin’s parents took him to the emergency room just to ensure there was no need for further treatment. They were advised not to allow Austin to do anything except (bed rest to rest his brain) for forty eight hours. Since

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    A Day in the Life of a Migraine Sufferer

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    concentration of evil spirits in the brain, common cures consisted of everything from drilling holes in the skull, to inserting garlic cloves into the temples(4). Today however, scientists realize that this all too common occurrence is actually a neurological disorder, which can result in the disability of its victim for hours or even days. I myself have been a constant sufferer of migraines since the age of ten. The following is the day in the life of a migraine sufferer: myself. I believe that

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    paper, I will discuss Familial Dysautonomia, a neurological disease that encapsulates the relationship between sensation, perception, emotion, physiological response and the nervous system. Familial Dysautonomia (FD), also called Riley-Day Syndrome, is one of five hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSANS) (2). FD is an autosomal recessive disease of the Ashkenazi, or European, Jewish population (3). As the name implies, this neurological disorder is characterized by the incomplete development

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