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    the story unfolds, readers get glimpses of internal issues that Nick Carraway that show him as more of a flawed character than previous thought of. The first issue that readers see and challenge in the novel is Nick’s attempt at being an unbiased narrator. He explains that his background and upbringing allows him to be impartial and non-judgmental, but certain instances in the novel prove

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    brings me to my next question . . .Is the narrator a man or a woman? It seems very easy to assume that the narrator is a man, because the author is a man, but other than that there is no real evidence proving narrative gender. In stanza one all we know about the narrator is that they are alone in a car. In stanza two all we know is that the narrator compares the young housewife to a "fallen leaf". And in stanza three, the final stanza, as the narrator passes on by, he or she bows, and smiles

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    Charlotte Perkins Gillman and her narrator both use writing as a tool of empowerment. In "The Yellow Wallapaper", Charlotte Perkins Gillman has intentionally crafted a fictional short story which conveys a plausible and even autobiographical account of the politics of gender and the overall position of women in the patriarchal society of the nineteenth century. Through her deliberate construction of a fictional journal which is written by an unnamed female narrator, Gillman is able to powerfully express

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    misinterpretation of Miss Brill until the end of the story. Miss Brill's character is a complex one. She cannot be stereotyped and she has a multifaceted personality. The reader sees several sides of her nature. Her almost mischievous side is revealed as the narrator tells how she waits for people to sit on r bench so that she might listen in on their conversations. This also reveals her need to be accepted. Further, her child like manner is exposed. This is done through the description of her Sunday ritual

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    The Malignant American in Surfacing

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    insensitivity to local culture.  In line with the foregoing stereotype, the unnamed narrator's use of the term American in Margaret Atwood's Surfacing is used to describe individuals of any nationality who are unempathetic and thus destructive.  The narrator, however, uses the word in the context of her guilt over her abortion and consequent emotional numbness.  The narrator's vituperative definition of American as an individual who is unempathetic and destructive is largely attributable to the narrator's

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    so did the style of narration. One of the most prominent examples of different narration is William Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying. In his novel, Faulkner reinvents the traditional expectation of having a single narrator by instead having multiple. Through this tactic of employing multiple narrators, Faulkner is able to change up traditional narration style, allowing readers to receive a wider breadth, rather than depth, of his novel so that independent conclusions can be drawn for each reader, instead

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    of conflict. There is a mental conflict within the narrator himself (assuming the narrator is male). Through obvious clues and statements, Poe alerts the reader to the mental state of the narrator, which is insanity. The insanity is described as an obsession (with the old man's eye), which in turn leads to loss of control and eventually results in violence. Ultimately, the narrator tells his story of killing his housemate. Although the narrator seems to be blatantly insane, and thinks he has freedom

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    Search for True Identity in Invisible Man "Who the hell am I?" (Ellison 386) This question puzzled the invisible man, the unidentified, anonymous narrator of Ralph Ellison's acclaimed novel Invisible Man. Throughout the story, the narrator embarks on a mental and physical journey to seek what the narrator believes is "true identity," a belief quite mistaken, for he, although unaware of it, had already been inhabiting true identities all along. The narrator's life is filled with constant

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    The Fear in the House of Usher The short story, The Fall of the House of Usher, uses a rational first person narrator to illustrate the strange effects the house has on the three characters within it. Everything about the house is dark and supernaturally evil, and appears to convey some fear that is driving its occupants insane. The narrator enters the story as a man with a lot of common sense and is very critical of the superstitious Usher, but he himself senses these same powers only he tries to

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    Narration, Metaphors, Images and Symbols in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest In 1962, when One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (the Nest), was published, America was at the start of decade that would be characterized by turmoil. Involvement in Vietnam was increasing, civil rights marches were taking place in the south and a new era of sexual promiscuity and drug use was about to come into full swing. Young Americans formed a subgroup in American society that historians termed the “counterculture”

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    (Bishop 463). Through the narration, tone and imagery used, the audience is led into creating a bond with the fish. This bond is essential, as it is through it, the audience develops the same admiration towards the fish as the narrator does and appreciates

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    victorious and continue thriving. Out of either bravery or wisdom, the fish did not put up a fight when caught by the narrator (Bishop 464). This may have been as a result of its various encounters with fishermen. In its aged beaten up state, the narrator would have felt sympathetic and simply let the fish go. Its body was also in a substandard condition, filled with strings and wires. The narrator was able to grasp the concept that no matter how gravely human beings abused nature, it would continue to thrive

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    The Depiction of Women in "The Yellow Wallpaper," by Charlotte Perkins Gilman and "The Chrysanthemums," by John Steinbeck Identical twins have the same genes that make both of them look, think, and feel the same. Their likes and dislikes are the same; for instance, when one likes yellow, the other will like yellow. However, their fortunes are different; for instance, when one dies, the other will not die. Similarly, in literature, different authors have created a twin character in different eras

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    larger-than-life characters, and the supernaturally centered plot lines all make these books Gothic novels, but how would one characterize the narrators? If there is anything that these three novels we have studied thus far have in common, it is that each of them have a third person narrator. Andrew Vachss, an American crime fiction author, once said that “The third person narrator, instead of being omniscient, is like a constantly running surveillance tape.” Perhaps, this is why the authors of these works chose

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    The Role of the Narrator

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    Tell Me A Story The narrator is the person telling the story and can range from one to several, within a single story. How the author develops the narration will direct how their work is perceived by the reader. The narrator can present the story reliably or dishonestly, from a compelling view to an ironic view. The author can lose or gain pertinent information simply by changing the narration. Narration is a guide for the reader “…it requires the invention of a narrator,” Diane Middlebook said

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    issues, and unsuccessful jobs, but they are frequently unable to understand or communicate their own sufferings. However, the main story consists of the narrator, known as “Bub,” facing an internal conflict about a blind man named Robert staying the night in his home. Regardless of the fact that this blind man is his wife 'e long time friend, the narrator cannot find himself comfortable with such an idea due to his extreme prejudices. Although, despite the narrator’s conflict he finds himself connecting

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    Sympathy For Characters in O. Henry's Furnished Room and Chekov's Vanka Two Works Cited  The narrators in both O. Henry's "The Furnished Room" and Anton Chekov's "Vanka" view their protagonists as desperate and helpless in a world of cold realism. With tones rich in sympathy, the narrators in both stories take pity on their characters. Both characters have yet to understand that realistically they have little control of the dismal life they lead; instead, their surroundings have more of an impact

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    A Rose for Emily

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    identity of the narrator or narrators. The townsfolk, as a whole, are the narrator, yet throughout the piece it is suggested that the spokesperson for the town changes. For example, in part I, the narration appears to be from a member of the older generation as he or she observes the “next generation, with its more modern ideas (788)” come to a dissatisfactory conclusion about a resolution for the odor coming from Miss Emily’s estate. However, in part IV it is suggested that the narrator for the townspeople

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    was solely due to his mysticism, the fact that his doors of perception were cleansed. What is his world like, then? In the "Songs of Innocence and Experience" we are apparently presented with two different worlds, narrated by two different narrators. A more careful reading will present several interesting correspondences between the two. For example, the meek "Lamb" becomes the fiery "Tyger". The former appears to foster a syllogistic reasoning, a format of simple questions and easy answers

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    “Greasy Lake”

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    perspective of an unnamed narrator, told as a reflective account of his youth. In the story, he recounts details of his experiences on a summer evening with two friends. The reader experiences the misadventures of the protagonist that night along as told from the viewpoint of the now mature narrators retrospective. Exposed in the story are two character traits of the protagonist. Those traits are immaturity and rebellion, along with the trait of introspection on the part of the narrator. Accordingly the

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