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    The Tale Of Genji By Murasaki Shikibu

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    The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu The Tale of Genji is considered the first great novel in the history of world literature. Murasaki Shikibu’s actual name is unknown, however it was common to name women after the office held by a male relative. Her father admired her academic brilliance but wished she were born a man instead because in the Heian society, Chinese learning was only valued for men. Men and women were strictly segregated in Heian Japan. Typically, women were married around ten or

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    “The Tale of Genji” by Murasaki Shikibu

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    The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu illustrates the ideal man in the form of Captain Genji. According to narrator, Genji was a son of the emperor from Kuritsubo. Due to the politics of Court life, Kokiden consort and her son become the favored for heirs to the throne instead of Genji. Nevertheless, Genji remains the ideal Heian man as his mother was the emperor’s favorite concubine. Yet the fact that Genji remained a favorite of the emperor spoke to his physical brilliance. Still, Genji only

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    The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu

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    relationships between a man and woman. Though the general concept is the same, from reading The Tale of Genji, it is what was considered the ideal woman and ideal man that were both surprising and thus worth discussing. Written around 978 by Murasaki Shikibu, The Tale of Genji, regarded as the world’s first novel, is an excellent source describing the ideal woman and man during the Heian period. Life in the Heian period revolved around the court and the social hierarchy that came with it. Thus it

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    educational rights. A very few women were brave enough to defy what social standards were set among them. Among these strong female figures was a young woman by the name of Murasaki Shikibu. Her spectacular literary works and opinions on women’s rights helped shape Japanese culture for both men and women. Lady Shikibu Murasaki was born into a lower branch of the powerful Fujiwara clan during the Heian period, Japan. She was born approximately in 978 AD. Lady Murasaki’s extended family was already

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    Role of Poetry in Heian Narrative Prose

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    201130/Handouts/Handout%202%20-%20Man_yoshu.pdf 3. Joseph, L. (2004). Heian poetry jam: the poetic and social history of waka. Retrieved from http://wodefordhall.com/heianpoetryjam.htm 4. Poetry. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poetry 5. Shikibu, I. (n.d.). The diary of Izumi Shikibu. Retrieved from https://laulima.hawaii.edu/access/content/group/MAN.80829.201130/Readings/Izumi%20Shikibu%20Diary.pdf 6. Waka. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/waka_(poetry)

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    The Ideal Man and Woman in The Tale of Genji

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    current male views of the perfect women, the ideals in the Heian period were various depending on the man. However, with that being said, there are still common features that each man’s “perfect woman” shares. In the tale of Genji, the author Murasaki Shikibu dedicates almost a whole chapter to a conversation between four men, including the famous Genji, about their ideal woman. Tō no Chūjō, a Guards Captain in the tale describes that even a seemingly perfect woman could be a disappointment. That

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    Ideal Man and Woman in The Tale of Genji

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    Based on Murasaki Shikibu’s “The Tale of Genji” the ideal man and the ideal woman of the Heian Court can easily be discerned as not truly existing, with the main character, Genji, being the nearly satirical example of what was the ideal man, and descriptions of the many women in the story as prescription of the ideal woman with the young Murasaki playing a similar role to that of Genji in the story. It is made clear from the beginning of the story that Genji is the example of the ideal man. In

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    Men and Women of The Heian Court

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    The Tale of Genji is believed to be have been mostly written by Murasaki Shikibu (973-1014 or 1075) in the year 1021 during the Heian Period (794-1184). It is considered to be one of the greatest works of fiction and it talks about the ideal roles of a man and woman during the Heian period. It also allows the modern audience to see the culture differences between what was considered the norm during the Heian Period and what is considered the norm during the 21th Century. The Tale of Genji tells the

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    Poetry of the Heian Period

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    The role of poetry in narrative prose of the Heian period was shaped through history under Chinese influence. This led to its importance in Japanese society and use not only as stand-alone works, but as significant parts of narrative prose, like monogatari and nikki. The poetry greatly reflected its use in societal activities, especially in the lives of the aristocrats. As the society developed, so did the style of Japanese narrative prose. In other words, poetry worked as a record of Japanese

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    not overly excited about her situation. The next important word is mad, another adjective, and also a synonym for crazy. The last word is depressed, meaning “sad and gloomy; dejected; downcast.” (Dictionary.com). In The Tale of Genji , I believe Murasaki becomes depressed because she loses her “spirit”. Yet she hides her real emotions. Why are these words pertinent? Well they serve a purpose to distinguish culture differences in the two works: The Tale of Genji and The Medea. The different culture

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