Free Mr. Brooks Essays and Papers

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    An Analysis of Brooks' First Fight.Then Fiddle Gwendolyn Brooks' "First fight. Then Fiddle." initially seems to argue for the necessity of brutal war in order to create a space for the pursuit of beautiful art. The poem is more complex, however, because it also implies both that war cannot protect art and that art should not justify war. Yet if Brooks seems, paradoxically, to argue against art within a work of art, she does so in order create an artwork that by its very recognition of art's

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    Gwendolyn Brooks' "We Real Cool" The poem 'We Real Cool' by Gwendolyn Brooks is a stream of the thoughts of poor inner city African-Americans who have adopted a hoodlum lifestyle. Though many can have different interpretations of this poem, it is fair to look at the life and career or the works and influences of Gwendolyn Brooks. The life and art of the black American poet, Gwendolyn Brooks, began on June 7, 1917 when she was born in Topeka, Kansas. She was the first child of Keziah Corine

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    Brooks, Gwendolyn

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    Brooks, Gwendolyn Poet, writer. Born June 7, 1917, in Topeka, Kansas. Throughout most of the twentieth century, Gwendolyn Brooks was a lyrical chronicler of the black urban experience in America. In 1950, she became the first African-American poet to win the Pulitzer Prize. Brooks grew up on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois. She began writing poetry as a young girl, and by the age of 16 had begun publishing her poems regularly in The Chicago Defender. She attended the Woodrow Wilson Junior

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    Gwendolyn Brooks' The Ballad of Late Annie

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    Gwendolyn Brooks' The Ballad of Late Annie "The Ballad of Late Annie" is one of several poems from Gwendolyn Brooks' "Notes from the Childhood and the Girlhood" section of her book Annie Allen. Published in 1949, Annie Allen, a mock epic of an African-American girl growing up in a time of increasing social tension, illustrated the existence of a black struggle that did not break into the American mainstream until the birth of the Civil Rights Movement ten years later. It is comprised of four

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    Gwendolyn Brooks

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    Gwendolyn Brooks- A Critical Analysis of Her Work Gwendolyn Brooks is the female poet who has been most responsive to changes in the black community, particularly in the community’s vision of itself. The first African American to be awarded a Pulitzer Prize; she was considered one of America’s most distinguished poets well before the age of fifty. Known for her technical artistry, she has succeeded in forms as disparate as Italian terza rima and the blues. She has been praised for her wisdom and

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    animals. The novel, however, was written by Mr. William Golding during the era of the cold war. The story takes place on an unpopulated island where a group of young school boys are stranded on after their plane crashed. The main characters of the story are two boys named Jack and Ralph. Jack represents the chaos on the island while Ralph represents how society acts when order is present. Along with the ideas that Ralph and Jack are symbolic characters, Brook uses the conch shell and the theme of loss

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    You're Not Cool at All

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    While all the other children are in school learning, and being; for the most part, obedient and civil youngsters , the seven dropouts “being cool” at the golden shovel in the story “We Real Cool” by Gwendolyn Brooks do not realize the amount of damage their doing to their futures by living the lifestyles they do. The work is a condensed yet concise statement on the recklessness of youth who are like cars without brakes in the frenzy of youth. They do not anticipate an accident awaiting them in their

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    Essay on Gwendolyn Brooks

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    Gwendolyn Brooks Writing with uncommon strength, Gwendolyn Brooks creates haunting images of black America, and their struggle in escaping the scathing hatred of many white Americans. Her stories, such as in the "Ballad of Rudolph Reed", portray courage and perseverance. In those like "The Boy Died in My Alley" Brooks portrays both the weakness of black America and the unfortunate lack of care spawned from oppression. In "The Ballad of Chocolate Mabbie" Brooks unveils another aspect of

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    The Black Counter-Culture in "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks After reading the poem "We Real Cool," by Gwendolyn Brooks, most people think that Brooks is making an ironic statement. Most will read the poem and think that Brooks is being sarcastic by using simple language and in the end asserting that the seven pool players will die soon, or more broadly that all who speak in this manner will die soon. No doubt some people will see Brooks' statement "We/Left school" as the beginning of her disapproval

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    Biography Of Nataniel Hawthorne

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    Tales, published in 1837. A brief period of paid employment, including the compilation of popular children's works and a stint at the Boston Custom House from 1839-to 1841, was followed by a half-year's residence at the transcendentalist community, Brook Farm. In 1842 he married Sophia Amelia Peabody, also a transcendentalist, and they moved to Concord, Mass., where he began a friendship with Henry David Thoreau. Financial problems forced his return to Salem from 1845 to 1849, where he secured another

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