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Free Moral Essays and Papers

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    America is in a Moral Decline The founders of America believed that a popular government and its laws necessarily rested upon an underlying moral order that preceded both the state and man-made law. They referred to this transcendent moral order in the Declaration of Independence as "self evident truths" and "the laws of nature and of nature's god" (Barr pg. 211). For a republic to work, the founders thought, the people had to internally guided by commonly shared moral values. The founders

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    Theory: Moral Relativism

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    Essay 5: On Moral Relativism Yifei Wu 1. Introduction People sometimes differ greatly in their views about moral issues. Some claim that abortion is permissible while others consider it morally unacceptable. Some believe cannibalism was essential to survival while others find it offensive. Recognizing the great extent of moral disagreements, some contemporary philosophers start to wonder whether morality is absolute in its nature. They propose a theory known as Moral Relativism, which holds that

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    Deontological moral theory is a Non-Consequentialist moral theory. While consequentialists believe the ends always justify the means, deontologists assert that the rightness of an action is not simply dependent on maximizing the good, if that action goes against what is considered moral. It is the inherent nature of the act alone that determines its ethical standing. For example, imagine a situation where there are four critical condition patients in a hospital who each need a different organ in

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    Moral Education in the University

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    Moral Education in the University ABSTRACT: Does the title of the World Congress of Philosophy, Paideia: Philosophy Educating Humanity, reflect hubris, irony or a pragmatic optimism? How is it possible for philosophy to educate the human community in the twenty-first century? More specifically, at a time when few people besides academic philosophers read philosophy, in what sense can philosophy educate humanity? In this essay I examine one possible way philosophy can educate humanity advanced

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    century, the moral treatment was first adopted by Dr. Willis and then popularized by French physician Philippe Pinel and British philanthropist William Tuke. Discouraged by the inefficiency of traditional treatments and inspired by the Enlightenment principle, these innovators tried to find a new approach to help psychotics back to sanity. Because the principle and practices of moral treatment place a high value on respecting the liberty, humanity, and individuality of patients, the moral treatment

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    Moral Relativism Essay

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    The debate between moral relativists and moral cognitivists is centered around the question of whether there exists a metric by which actions and intentions can be judged. To avoid any confusion and prevent the opportunity for any strawman attacks, morality will be considered in a broad sense as the distinction between what a person ought to do and ought not do. Also, moral relativism will be defined as holding the belief that moral actions are relative, or subjective, to contextual circumstance

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    My Moral Philosophy

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    What is a moral code? I feel that a moral code is a "unwritten code that one lives by," This code is indicating how I should live. There is not anyone watching over me judging my moral code; just I am responsible to my self for my actions. However, a moral code should always be in my head and tells me how to act in all situations. An example would be littering; is it right to throw that gum wrapper out the window of my car? No, just put it in a pocket, I can throw it out later. If you I throw that

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    Moral Sentiments and Determinism

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    compatibilist literature. Although most of the central claims in Strawson’s essay are important and true, it fails to fill the lacuna in the analysis, discussion and proposals of traditional compatibilism. The reasons may be summarized as follows. The web of moral demands, feelings and participant attitudes comprises a set of facts within human social life which must be investigated in order to understand the relation (or lack thereof) between determinism and morality. If the facts themselves fill the gap, then

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    For a long time, people have been questioning what morals are. They have questioned whether morals have any intrinsic value and if they do, are there moral codes that apply to everyone. One of the approaches to this question is moral relativism. Moral Relativism is the idea that moral standards have intrinsic value, but are not universal or objective. Moral truths are based on either cultural of individual beliefs. Moral relativists believe that moral claims can neither be true nor false, therefore

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    Teaching Morals in Public Schools

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    appearance in the character of today's youth. Teaching morals in public school could only result in the betterment of our society. American public schools started walking away from their moral educators about a generation ago, around the 1960's. They feared possibilities of being accused of imposing religion or "indoctrinating" children, so they left moral instruction to parents and the community, and stuck strictly to academics (Smith). Teaching morals has been misconceived as a violation of the First

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