Free Montague Summers Essays and Papers

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    The Appearance of Incest in Gothic Fiction

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    The Law of the Father: The Appearance of Incest in Gothic Fiction In her book Deadly Secrets Anne Williams says that "gothic escape fictions provide a virtual reality, and experimental world in which the repressed -- especially the female in all its guises -- might be realized" (96). Society in the eighteenth century operated under staunch patriarchal control which has been dubbed by critics like Lacan as "The Law of the Father". The Law of the father, according to Lacan, is founded on the distinction

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    Gothic Fiction: The Representation of Evil in Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto. The Castle of Otranto is a 1764 novel written by Horace Walpole. It is regarded as the first Gothic novel, initiating a new literary genre which became extremely popular in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Gothic literature’s desire to explore the unknown, the unexplainable, inexplicable and the terrifying can be seen as a reaction to the Enlightenment’s emphasis on the rational and knowable. The Enlightenment

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    Using Novels to Ilustrate Gothic Realism

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    When a person thinks about gothic today, they might think of a sparkly vampire or a hunky Frankenstein in popularized films. This has led to parodies upon these adaptations of the gothic. This relationship between traditional gothic characters and parodies is not a new subject but a very interesting dynamic. I would like to discuss how the typical gothic novel, The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole, and Jane Austen’s parody of the gothic novel in Northanger Abbey work together to illustrate gothic

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    An Edition Of The Rover

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    first edition, printed in 1677. The first comparison text was an issue of the second edition that was printed in 1697. The second comparison text was a 1915 volume edited by Montague Summers. Summers’ text was chosen because it is based primarily upon a 1724 collection of Behn’s dramatic pieces--a collection that, according to Summers, is “by far the best and most reliable edition of the collected theater.” Most of the changes documented in the textual notes stem from substantive discrepancies between

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    about his not thinking about his age he is just thinking of fighting and trying to save face in front of the citizens if Verona. He does this not to just save face but also because of the feud this is shown by when he says ‘'My sword I say! Old Montague is come…flourishes his blade in spite of me. This first sighting of Lord Capulet is not favourable because he is just showing his hotheadedness instead of leaving everything to the young people because of his age. The next time we see Lord Capulet

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    and has not properly been recorded, its exact history is hard to explain. It is easier to see witchcraft as a mindset or belief than an organized institution. According to Montague Summers, 'witches can be described as heretics and anarchists,'; most of which follow the chief of demons, also known as the Devil. Obviously Mr. Summers, along with many other people, takes a pessimistic view towards the realm of witchcraft. Among these anti-witch enthusiasts was Henry VIII, who was the first king of England

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    them as well. Their love and devotion for one another causes them to rebel against the institution of family. All in all, "love, which is the emotional ground of the Family, is here destroying the Family itself" (Snider). Among the Capulet and Montague families, why does the persistent rebellion among the children exist? Supposedly, the feud is fueled solely by their parent’s strife; however, it is clear that the children are brought into the picture and are victims of Verona’s violent social climate

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    talking to herself in the garden and Romeo is still listening. c. doff- remove d. Though Not- even though you were not Owes- owns or possesses e. It's only your name that's my enemy. You'd still be yourself even if you stopped being a Montague. What's a Montague anyway? It isn't a hand, a foot, an arm, a face, or any other part of a man. Oh, be some other name! What does a name mean? The thing we call a rose would smell just as sweet if we called it by any other name. Romeo would be just as perfect

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    and Juliet to commit suicide because they are not allowed to love each other. It’s the kind of dramatic story that makes teenage hearts swoon: pure love, passionate love, forbidden love. And while the passionate romance of young Capulet and young Montague is essential to the play, it is by no means the only way to understand Romeo and Juliet. Unfortunately, many students are first exposed to this particular work early in high school, an age at which the issue of love resonates more powerfully than

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    are introduced to two characters, Sampson and Gregory. Itching for a fight, they believe they have as much responsibility to defend the name Capulet as their masters do. "The quarrel is between our masters and us their men." They encounter some  Montagues and decide to taunt them. They have intentions of just having a little fun and maybe a chance to play with their swords. Almost like a child anticipating the amusement he will have with his new Christmas toys. Instead, they provoke the Capulets enough

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