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    The Monoamine Oxidase A Gene

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    chromosomes that helps negate the faulty DNA. [1] Through linkage analysis of the families DNA Dr. Brunner team had discovered the specific gene in fact existed on the short arm of the X chromosome. The mutated gene produced an inactive form of monoamine oxidase A that normally would help in breaking down neurotransmitters in the brain. [1] This can explain why antisocial behaviors in males is much more prevalent than in females. [8][9][10] The mutation present in the Brunner studies are extremely rare

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    standards set by generations as acceptable amounts of violence to meet today’s standards. Although what is it that contributes towards this need for aggression? Upon examining the present article discussions regarding genetic contributions seen with Monoamine Oxidase A (MAO

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    Brunner Syndrome Analysis

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    Introduction Brunner syndrome is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized by impulsive aggressiveness and mild mental retardation associated with MAOA deficiency. According to Brunner, it is a rare genetic disorder with a mutation in the MAOA gene (monoamine oxidase A gene). It is characterized by lower than average IQ (typically about 85), is a problematic impulsive behavior (such as arson, hypersexuality and violence), is also a sleep disorders and mood swings. Brunner syndrome was first discover by Hens

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    Definition of Neurotransmitters Depression can happen to anyone. It is a disease that is caused by an abnormality in the delivery of certain neurotransmitters in the brain. Neurotransmitters are like messengers and carry information to neurons. Once they have sent their “message”, they are able to become reabsorbed through the original neuron. This is a process called reuptake. The amazing thing about neurotransmitters is that some of them can cause the neurons to fire, while others actually inhibit

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    The eugenics movement started in the early 1900s and was adopted by doctors and the general public during the 1920s. The movement aimed to create a better society through the monitoring of genetic traits through selective heredity. Over time, eugenics took on two different views. Supporters of positive eugenics believed in promoting childbearing by a class who was “genetically superior.” On the contrary, proponents of negative eugenics tried to monitor society’s flaws through the sterilization of

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    Gathering correct Schizophrenia Information is the first step along the road to recovery. Yes – it is possible to recover from Schizophrenia when it is properly diagnosed and treated. Many people diagnosed with Schizophrenia have re-learned necessary life skills and are able to function independently. Unfortunately, some people have been diagnosed incorrectly. In times past, Schizophrenia was referred to as "bread madness", which indicated a connection to gluten sensitivity. Even today, many people

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    The Gender and Chemistry of Suicide Suicide is a perplexing aspect of human behavior. There are hundreds of possible causes for suicide, but one underlying reason usually prevails. When life seems unbearable and hopelessly dreary, the only apparent way out for some individuals is to end their own painful existence. To other mentally "stable" individuals, suicide can be a question that can never be answered. Suicide is final, and no one comes back to explain why the decision

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    Sudafed Research Paper

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    When taking Sudafed ,which is an decongestant, is taken along side of MAO inhibitors the side effects of both of the medications can become even more dangerous. The common side effects from taking sudafed are Nervousness, restlessness, and trouble sleeping. These side effects are basic side effects that almost everyone gets after taking Sudafed. The more less common effects are fast or pounding heart, sweating, headache, dizziness or lightheadedness (Drugs.com). These side effects are hardly ever

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    Violence and the Brain

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    Violence and the Brain Is there a biological basis for violent behavior in the brain? Recent research links "neurological impairments and psychoses" to violent behavior (1). The "psychological effects" of brain damage and disease can cause the mind to lose touch with reality leading to criminal and violent behavior (1). As a result, free will may be deserted in an individual suffering from abnormalities and chemical imbalances in the brain (2). Consequently, legal issues arise because violent

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    Implications Of Crime And Crime

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    may choose to violate the law. During his research Adrian Raine identified one potential gene that when altered could cause a person to become antisocial and commit crimes (Bartol & Bartol, 2014, Pg. 65). The gene that was identified was the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene, it was discovered that if they removed the gene from a mouse it would become aggressive (Bartol & Bartol, 2014, Pg. 65). Researchers have also identified at least seven genes that are associated with antisocial behavior (Bartol

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