Free Moloch Essays and Papers

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Free Moloch Essays and Papers

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    John Milton's Paradise Lost John Milton’s Paradise Lost is filled with fantastical tales from the depths of Hell, extravagant descriptions of the fallen angels, and a curious recitation of the council of demons in their new palace. How did Milton dream up such vivid depictions of such horrible demons as the ones we see in Book I? Most of his fallen angels originate in the form of Pagan gods condemned by the Bible, with actual historical backgrounds which Milton cites in his lengthy descriptions

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    Application of Excess in Morrison’s Sula and Ginsberg’s Howl In William Blake’s Marriage of Heaven and Hell, he declares that "the road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom…Those who restrain desire, do so because theirs is weak enough to be restrained." These beliefs are reiterated and expanded upon in both Toni Morrison’s novel Sula and Allen Ginsberg’s epic poem Howl. Both authors challenge the conception of socially imposed boundaries, which suppress the absolute freedom of thought and

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    Ginsberg’s Howl is a political poem because it offers a sharp critique of American politics and culture. Throughout the poem the reader is presented with a less than favorable portrait of America. Racism, atomic fear, the military industrial complex as Moloch all serve to criticize the United States of the Forties and Fifties. The Forties were dominated by World War II and the atomic bombs, which were followed by a postwar economic and baby boom. The Fifties were a time of change, the middle class was

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    Spirituality in Howl by Allen Ginsberg

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    reveals through a multitude of sharp images and phrases that everything from drug use to homosexuality to mental illness is holy, even in a world of atom bombs and materialistic America, which Ginsberg considers not to be holy and he refers to as Moloch. As it is stated in Ginsberg's "Footnote To Howl," "The world is holy! The soul is holy! The skin is holy! The nose is/ holy! The tongue and cock and hand and *censored* holy! / Everything is Holy! Everybody's holy! Everywhere is holy!" (3-5). Sexuality

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    conform to the desired sense of normality. Ginsberg states “I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked/ dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix” (9). His expression of Moloch The angry fix is what all of these “best minds” look for after being stripped of their freedom to conform to the new American culture after World War II. The form of Ginsberg’s poem challenges the American culture by resistance from “best minds”

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    Resistance in Allen Ginsberg's Howl

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    In Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl”, the idea of resistance is present in multiple forms. On a thematic level, Ginsberg exploits the reasons the “best minds” of his generation are being destroyed (9). On a formal level, Ginsberg uses lengthy sentences to resist traditional styles of writing. Ginsberg was successful in his rebellion and gained substantial recognition; further supported by the fact he even had to fight for his freedom of expression in the court of law. As a whole, “Howl” has been a controversial

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    Allen Ginsberg

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    Allen Ginsberg, Covert Patriot Allen Ginsberg is, without a doubt, most famous for his poem "Howl" which he published in October of 1956 through City Lights Books in San Francisco. "Howl", like much of his other poetry, is an intensely personal and also very complex poetic expression lacking rhyme and, to many people, also lacking reason. In actuality, however, "Howl" serves as an autobiographical sketch and it acts, in some ways, as a precursor to his lesser known poem from the same publication

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    Resisting the Machines of society

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    Resistance is a power that everyone holds within them. People have the ability to resist or give in to anything brought upon them. Resistance is the refusal to accept something that one feels does not match their needs, or beliefs. People often resist movements through actions, or argumentation. In, Allen Ginsberg’s, “Howl,” the theme of resistance is present in many different aspects. He shocked many people across the nation when the poem was published due to its vulgar words, and unorthodox

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    using repetition maintained a rhythm throughout the poem, allowing him to keep that constant tone for the audience. With his illustrations, readers are capable of vividly capturing the image by using relatable and realistic examples. For instance, Moloch, being a nonrealistic object could be clearly seen as a machine that is powered by blood, money, and corruption. Considering the complexity of this piece, it gave me reason to believe that it was Ginsberg’s intention to allow us to seek our own meaning

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    Ginsberg uses religion in “Howl” to show the structures of society. He especially uses, Moloch – a false God – in the poem to show what he believed to be the conformity of people. However, he also uses small portions of the poem to show the other religious views there are. In the first section of “Howl,” Ginsberg uses an anaphoric return going with the word “who.” He also does this in second section with “Moloch.” However, in the first section with “who,” raises the question as to why the people

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