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Free Molly Bloom Essays and Papers

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    The Character of Molly Bloom in Ulysses In James Joyce's Ulysses, the character of Molly Bloom appears significantly only twice in the entire span of the novel. She appears for the first time in the episode "Calypso," then we do not hear from her again until the very end, in her own words, in "Penelope." Yet in these two instances, Joyce paints a very affectionate, lighthearted and humorous portrait of Molly Bloom -- perhaps not a complete rendition, but a substantial one, with enough colors

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    Until the last chapter of Ulysses, Molly Bloom was primarily seen through the eyes of the other viewpoint characters in the story. They are only small glimpses into her personality, and other than the few lines she does say, we see little of her own thoughts. In episode eighteen, we finally get her world view, even though her thoughts contradict themselves at times. In that episode, James Joyce is attempting to explore the mind of a 'universal woman', and their mindset, filtered through the eyes

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    I Had to Fight to Read

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    It was summer, stinking hot in a small town and I was fifteen and bored. The town librarian had been giving me grief since I was eleven and in the sixth grade, when she issued her first decree that I wasn't "old enough" to check out what became the first of a long line of books I had to fight to read. It was also the first of many times when one or both of my parents trudged down to the library to insist equally firmly that she had no right to restrict my choices as I had their permission to read

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    To The Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf

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    he states she is “ten thousa... ... middle of paper ... ...want to be a mother" (15.374) this is seen to be of a humorous nature yet it draws to the attention of the reader Blooms ability to sympathize with the women around him and his ability to consider the pain and struggles they go through. Joyce utilises Bloom as a voice that appreciates women and understands their plight. Works Cited Justin Levenstein. ‘Ulysses, Dubliners, and the Nature of Relationships in the Modern World’. Emergence:

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    Use of Language in James Joyce's Ulysses

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    this passage of generalized simulacra. Perhaps Ulysses is an extravagant Rube Goldberg machine, or even transit system of signs, an indeterminate semeiotic. Even Molly’s closing words echo this contingent though non-arbitrary nature in her choosing Bloom for her life’s mate: “I thought well as well him as another … yes I said yes I will Yes” (18.1604-9). This “Yes” is an opening not a closing, the closed form of the novel is elided, and we find ourselves again, as indeed we had during our reading,

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    Ulysses by James Joyce

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    reader follows the hero, Leopold Bloom, as he circumnavigates Dublin, eventually making his way out in the morning and home at the end of the day. We meet Leopold's wife Molly and his friend Stephen Dedalus, as well as "hundreds of other Dubliners as they walk the streets, meet and talk, then talk some more in restaurants and pubs. All this activity seems rando... ... middle of paper ... ...t the book ends with Molly's great life-affirming "yes". Leopold Bloom goes out on June 16, 1904 to discover

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    Portrayal of Women in James Joyce's Ulysses

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    Portrayal of Women in James Joyce's Ulysses The novel, "Ulysses", by James Joyce shows the reader hour by hour a single day in the life of one man.  But this epic which specifically deals with Leopold Bloom and has reference to Stephen Dedalus, holds so much more appendage to other areas of life.  One, is the portrayal of women in Ulysses. A common speculation is that men seem to have a more dominating status over women.  However, in Ulysses that theory dwindles due to the women who  play significant

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    was no preexisting "in-bed monologue" genre-but it is the most conscious and critical of feminine linguistic construction. "Female" words (through letters to Bloom) are the constant aural background in Bloom's mind, but he fixates on them precisely because of their "bad writing" (4.414), a... ... middle of paper ... ...him as Molly thinks about him in the present and, most importantly, well after Joyce wrote about him, in the eternal lines of "Penelope." Works Cited and Consulted

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    Comparing Ulysses and American Beauty

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    wondrous revealment, half-offered like those skirt-dancers" at Leopold Bloom, igniting his sexual fireworks on a beach in Dublin (366). In a film set almost 100 years later in an American suburb, another virginal seductress flips her dance skirt, giving admirers a peek at her panties, and inspires Bloom's modern incarnation, Lester Burnham, into a similar burst of auto-eroticism. The "metempsychosis" of Leopold Bloom into Lester Burnham isn't the only astonishing similarity between Ulysses

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    Ulysses. Molly Bloom is not the two-dimensional caricature many have suggested. She is so much more than that. Molly rebels against her traditional domestic role, is a voice for female emancipation, an example for feminine power, and the embodiment of unified sensuality and spirituality. These untraditional qualities have led some critics to accuse Molly of being a mere projection of the male psyche, without a real voice of her own. These criticisms ignore the powerful way in which Molly challenges

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