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Free Modern English Essays and Papers

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    Foreign and English Translations and Versions of Beowulf From 1805 until the present there have been introduced an abundance of paraphrases, translations, adaptations, summaries, versions and illustrations of Beowulf in modern English and in foreign languages due mostly to two reasons: the desire to make the poem accessible, and the desire to read the exotic (Osborn 341). It is the purpose of this essay to present a brief history of this development of the popularity of the poem and then compare

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    Today’s modern English language did not develop overnight, rather over hundreds and thousands of centuries. The main background that we develop our language from is Greek, however we also have to think about where the Greeks derived their language from. After a very long chain reaction going through multiple cultures, the language that we use to this day arose and can be traced back to its original roots. The language of the early ancient Egyptians consisted of picture-like drawings that could be

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    The Theme of Hopkins' Sonnet, The Windhover "'The Windhover' is one of the most discussed, and it would seem least understood, poems of modern English literature." These opening words of a Hopkins' critic forewarn the reader of Hopkins' "The Windhover" that few critics agree on the meaning of this sonnet. Most critics do concur, however, that Hopkins' central theme is based on the paradoxical Christian principle of profit through sacrifice. Although most critics eventually focus on this pivotal

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    The Colonists

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    "What should you take by force that which you can have from us by love?" -Powhatan 1609 The colonists in Jamestown were lazy. They wanted to search for gold rather than grow food. The English began to starve which led them to steal from the Powhatan tribe. This is a continuing trend through US history. By 1830 the Indians were removed from their ancestral lands and given very poor land. In 1607 Britain established Jamestown, the 1st permanent British Colony in America. Jamestown was led by

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    Especially since the creation of electronics and the constant changing of the english language people think this story is completely irrelevant to a person in modern times. The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet is an irrelevant work for a person in modern times due to the lack of, modern english, modern love concepts, and storyline. One way Romeo and Juliet is an irrelevant work is that it does not have modern english. This can be seen all in the play such as when Juliet says, “O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore

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    descriptions of the past. The most obvious of these is section two, in which two descriptions of the present (lines 111-139 and 140-172) immediately follow a description of the past (lines 77-110). In this case, the juxtaposition is used to hold the modern attitude toward sex and love next to an attitude from the past. In the first part of section two, the description opens with a reference to the description of Antony and Cleopatra's first meeting in Shakespeare's play Antony and Cleopatra, and Eliot's

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    com, that “Shakespeare is the second most quoted writer of the English language, only second to the various writers of the Bible”. Today, Shakespeare can be found all over modern society around the world. Through both his legacy and his words, Shakespeare has made innumerous contributions to society, most notably in the entertainment industry, as a major contributor to the English language, and as a large source of inspiration for English literature. First and foremost, Shakespeare has become a great

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    Imperialism in India

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    The English also built many institutions in India and setup a productive government. "They have framed wise laws and have established courts of justice"(The Economic History Of India Under Early British Rule). In addition to all these positive affects, Britain also linked India to the modern world through modern science and modern thought. However, where the is good there has to be bad. British colonization of India had it's drawbacks. As the great Mohandas Gahndi once said " You English committed

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    The Egoist

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    The Egoist George Meredith's The Egoist: A Literary and Critical History George Meredith was an English author, critic, poet, and war correspondent. He was considered to be a successful writer. He published several works of fiction and poetry. These works included: The Ordeal of Richard Feverel, The Tragic Comedians, Modern Love Poems of the English Roadside, and Poems and Lyrics of the Joy of Earth among many others. Toward the end of his career, after the tragic deaths of his wife and son

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    Metafiction and JM Coetzee's Foe

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    used to describe JM Coetzee's Foe, one of the more commonly written about is metafiction. Since about 1970, the term metafiction has been used widely to discuss works of post-modern fiction and has been the source of heated debate on whether its employ marks the death or the rebirth of the novel. A dominant theme in post-modern fiction, the term "metafiction" has been defined by literary critics in multiple ways. John Barth offers perhaps the most simplified definition: metafiction is "a novel that

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