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Free Modem Essays and Papers

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    Modems

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    Modems Modems are used to connect two computers over a phone line. Modem is short for Modulator Demodulator. It's a device that converts data from digital computer signals to analog signals that can be sent over a phone line. This is called modulation. The analog signals are then converted back into digital data by the receiving modem. This is called demodulation. A modem is fed digital information, in the form of ones and zeros, from the CPU. The modem then analyzes this information and converts

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    modems

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    signal-to-noise ratio. A voice connection through a conventional phone network uses a bandwidth of about 3,000 hertz (Hz): from about 300 Hz to 3,300 Hz. An analog modem operating at 33.6 kilobits per second (kbps) requires a slightly wider bandwidth 3,200 Hz and needs a very good connection, one with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Modems operating at 56 kbps achieve their rates by taking advantage of digital connections that circumvent some sources of noise in transmissions toward the end user. But

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    The Evolution of The Modem The word modem is an acronym for Modulator Demodulator. Modems accept digital data supplied by the personal computer, and convert it to a modulated analog waveform that can be transmitted over an analog telephone line. Modems also work in reverse. They take a modulated analog wave from the phone line, then convert it to a digital form, then pass it onto the personal computer (PC). Modems, at connection, send tones to each other to negotiate the fastest mutually supported

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    The History Of The Modem

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    The modem, which is an acronym for modulator/demodulator, was invented in the 1950's for military use. Manufactured by the now popular computer company, IBM, modems were used as part of an air-defense system; their purpose was to connect various airbases and control centers. Modems are devices that mix (modulate) and separate (demodulate) signals, allowing one computer to connect to another. They transfer the data over telephone lines by using analog waves and the modem then converts the waves

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    Modem Uses

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    Modem Uses Digital lines are used for transmitting large volumes of data at a fast rate. Analogue lines are often used by single users with little data transfer, perhaps for a small amount of e-mail used over a conventional telephone line. Advantages and Disadvantages * Digital lines are more expensive to install than normal telephone lines and the line rental is higher. * Modems must be purchased for use with normal telephone lines. * There is much faster transmission

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    Cable Modem Access

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    access. Until now internet the public had to access the WWW through slow phone lines, connecting anywhere from 300 bps in the infancy of public access to 56k. But now there are several high-speed alternatives to the old phone line, one being the cable modem. Using your cable TV provider as your ISP, people can access the Internet at speeds up to 27 Mbps, but limitations with hardware limit this to about 2Mbps (www.TechTarget.com). This speed is fine for most users. It is also “always on”. Meaning you

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    A Brief History and Explanation of Modems

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    A modem (modulate demodulate) is a network device that both modulates and demodulates analog carrier signals (called sine waves) for encoding and decoding digital information for processing (Janssen C 2014). The most common use of modems is both for sending and receiving digital information between personal computers and for connecting to the internet. Modem is considered as an important hardware of computer and most computers in the past came with a built in modem, but now many manufacturers are

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    Cable Modems in the Workplace

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    Cable Modems in the Workplace Until recently, small businesses could not afford T-1 service to connect to the network. The recent advent of cable modems has provided a cheaper alternative to this problem. Cable operators have primarily targeted consumers in their initial cable modem rollouts. Multiple System Operators (MSOs) are now selling higher priced broadband Internet services to the corporate customer. The question is, does cable modem technology provide the optimum service for a medium

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    ISDN VS. Cable Modem

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    ISDN VS. Cable Modem 1.0 Introduction The Internet is a network of networks that interconnects computers around the world, supporting both business and residential users. In 1994, a multimedia Internet application known as the World Wide Web became popular. The higher bandwidth needs of this application have highlighted the limited Internet access speeds available to residential users. Even at 28.8 Kilobits per second (Kbps)—the fastest residential access commonly available at the time of this

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    Cable Modems Vs. Digital Subscriber

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    suffer with the slow connections available with analog modems or spend a relatively large amount on having a digital line, such as ISDN, installed and then continue paying a lot for the monthly charges associated with such lines. Standard analog modems have always been hindered by the bandwidth they are allowed to use. Standard voice grade phone lines use the frequency spectrum between 0khz and 4khz to transmit their signal. 33.6 kbps modems packed nearly 11 bits of data per hertz, a remarkable feat

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