Free Mircea Eliade Essays and Papers

Satisfactory Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Powerful Essays
Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Profane: A Nature of Religion, Mircea Eliade attempts to define the sacred by stating it is “the opposite of the profane” (pg. 10). Through out the book he tries to explain this statement through the concept of hierophany (the idea that one can experience, sensorily, the manifestation of the holy/sacred), however his main explanation of the sacred being “the opposite of the profane” is the comparison of a modern religious man and a modern non-religious man (a profane man). Eliade compares the two by explaining

    • 768 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 1 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Sacred Space

    • 1243 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Sacred space is one of the types of spatial condition being analyzed by Mircea Eliade’s religious journal. It is related to purification and can only be apprehended by a religious person. According to Eliade, “For a religious man, a space is not homogeneous as he experiences interruption, breaks in it; some parts of space are qualitatively different from others” (20). He also believes that a person in a sacred space will ultimately reach a threshold that personify the frontier which distinguishes

    • 1243 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Abstinence and Orgy in Measure for Measure

    • 2585 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 13 Works Cited

    (Rossiter 108-28); the modified position of Elizabeth Marie Pope that the Duke is a successful magistrate with divinely-delegated powers ("Renaissance" 66-82), almost in line with Eliade’s version of a receding sky-god replaced by a local delegate (see Eliade 52); the attack upon Vincentio’s foolish "mystification" by Clifford Leech (69-71); and the concomitant understanding by Wylie Sypher that the Duke’s Vienna is merely an arbitrary, chaotic locale where passion and abstinence indifferently change place

    • 2585 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 13 Works Cited
    Powerful Essays
  • Best Essays

    worlds and interaction with unearthly beings is juxtaposed with a dependency to a participatory community. In the end scholarship is given an understanding of the shaman that is accord with the reality of the cultural circumstances. References Eliade, M. (2005). In L. Jones (Ed.), Encyclopedia of religion (2nd ed. ed., pp. 8269-8274). Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA. Pharo, L. K. (2011). A methodology for a deconstruction and reconstruction of the concepts “Shaman” and “Shamanism”. Numen: International

    • 1891 Words
    • 4 Pages
    • 5 Works Cited
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    initiates had to travel to Eleusis (‘Mystery religion’ n.d.). In ancient Greece, there was a sense of community and belonging in a Greek being able to say “I am initiated into the Eleusinian religion... ... middle of paper ... ... Britain. Mircea Eliade "From Primitives to Zen": THE ELEUSINIAN MYSTERIES, n.d. Man and the Sacred, accessed 16 March 2014, . ‘Mystery religion’ n.d., in Encyclopaedia Britannica, accessed 12 March 2014, . Orpheus, n.d., Vase, Ovid's Metamorphoses, accessed 27 March

    • 929 Words
    • 2 Pages
    • 11 Works Cited
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Personal Statement

    • 531 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Zhanna Kurmangaziyeva Personal Statement Educational system in universities differs from one another. Students are taught new material which is usually memorization of known things. Albert Einstein mentioned that it is miracle that curiosity still survives after receiving formal education. For me Biology is very important, interesting and challenging study, however, I agree with Bryan H. McGill who once wrote that curiosity is one of the greatest secrets of happiness. Being able to question how

    • 531 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Test

    • 527 Words
    • 2 Pages

    International divorce and how to initiate it Pursuing a relationship abroad was once considered a rare choice, however cross-cultural relationships are considered far more common in the 21st century. In fact, more people are choosing to participate in such types of relationships instead of more traditional home-based marriages. With the number of international relationships on the rise, so is the amount of international divorce cases. When divorce is considered the only option left in a relationship

    • 527 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Case Study Of CAR

    • 832 Words
    • 2 Pages

    CAR is a 3,500-member organization that operates in the car industry in Michigan. Recently, the company has experienced a depleting figure in its sales staff with the organizations long-term partner who would make close to 20% of the turnover swapped to the organizations competitors. On the other hand, it is significant to note that CAR’s CEO’s stayed in the company for more than 12 months, an aspect that has always made it challenging for these individuals to initiate change in the organization

    • 832 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Blessed Be According to the Online Entomology Dictionary, the word Bless is derived from the “Old English bletsian, bledsian, Northumbrian bloedsian "to consecrate, make holy, give thanks," from Proto-Germanic *blodison "hallow with blood, mark with blood," from *blotham "blood"…. Originally a blood sprinkling on pagan altars.” The word Blessed is noted to have come into common use in the 12th century, meaning to be “supremely happy” or “consecrated”. Used interchangeably with the word blest,

    • 777 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The book “The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion”, written by Mircea Eliade, investigates four aspects of the sacred universe: space, time, nature, and self. Eliade splits each aspect into two forms of perception, the sacred and profane. Religious men, specifically the ancient, traditional men, view the universe as sacred. In other words, they acknowledge a distinct qualitative difference between a sacred and profane (non-sacred) universe; whereas, nonreligious, specifically modern men

    • 844 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Respect In this paper I will argue that respect, when earned, is more stable, more specific, and allows for a better relationship then when respect is simply demanded. Respect has been a major issue throughout time. Towns and countries alike were crushed simply for disrespecting their invaders. Vlad Dracul, a Transylvanian ruler most feared for his barbaric behavior used to cut off the heads of nonconformist villagers and place them on stakes outside his castle. The reason this issue is so important

    • 754 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    significance, Rudolf Otto believes the Sacred is essentially a nonrational and indescribable event of human experience. Mircea Eliade builds on Otto’s view, stating that the Sacred always establishes itself as something nonordinary. Eliade points out that both natural objects and human artifacts are capable of and have been transformed from a common use to a sacred presence. Since Otto and Eliade have a somewhat different view of the Sacred, they seem to have a different view on the experience a human has

    • 550 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Analysis Of Popol Vuh

    • 656 Words
    • 2 Pages

    don’t exploit the lands (the giver of corn) because “Everything that is…manifests itself above the waters” (Eliade, Mircea, The Sacred and the Profane, Harcourt 1959, Pg. 131) and therefore having a connection to the gods. Notions of sacred space are defined in the classical image of the sky. The sky shows itself to be “infinite, transcendent…it is preeminently the wholly other” (Eliade, Mircea, The Sacred and the Profane, Harcourt 1959, Pg. 118). Transcendence is revealed by this infinite height.

    • 656 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Analysis Of Hagia Sophia

    • 892 Words
    • 2 Pages

    considered the most important Byzantine structure with its impressive architecture, artwork, and large size. While Hagia Sophia often viewed as a beautiful, massive structure, it also possesses a much deeper importance that can be examined in light of Mircea Eliade’s book, The Sacred and the Profane. This paper will attempt to examine several of Eliade’s philosophical concepts and how they relate to Hagia Sophia’s internal divisions, connections to God, and location. Internal divisions play a large role

    • 892 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    participate in a sacred place and time. The act of a physical baptism stresses nonhomogeneity, which recognizes that some spaces are not the same as others. Baptism usually happens in a church, in which people go for meaning and refreshment. Mircea Eliade, a Romanian historian of religion, wrote "For a

    • 785 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    1. Compare and contrast Emile Durkheim’s and Mircea Eliades understanding of religion. Emile Durkheim uses a functional approach when understanding religion, the function of a religion and not a belief system. Durkheim looks at what religion does for society as a whole and how it creates social cohesion. Social cohesion is defined as the result of a community rallying around a totem, which can be a sacred object that ultimately creates a religion within society. For example, the traditional Christmas

    • 1059 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Ancient Jerusalem

    • 1193 Words
    • 3 Pages

    (64 Eliade) Eliade defines the theophany as the moment when God, or the angel, appear and get in contact with people; hierophany as the symbol of the God such as a tree or stone. (12, 25 Eliade) Jerusalem is the “axis mundi” of the world, which is the orientation of the cosmos and the middle of the universe, can communicate with heaven, earth and underground

    • 1193 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The “Sacred and the Profane” by Mircea Eliade, explores two innovative perspective of religion with aspects of the traditional and modern. Eliade draws principles such as heterogeneous in space based on experiencing the world as sacred. On the contrary, the homogenous man is blocked to these sacred experiences, since the world is experienced as profane. Additionally, Eliade discusses the alignment in space allowing the manifestation of the sacred—hierophany. This is the most fundamental concept that

    • 694 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Myth is an often misunderstood subject that involves the foundations of any religion today. Due to the connotations of the word now, religious people find the implication of the word “myth” to be the equivalent of “false”. Of course, when applied to their own religion, this is found to be incredibly disrespectful coming from scholars studying the subject. However, nowadays the meaning of myth has been confused with the definition of a fairytale, a fictitious tale created to teach morals by the use

    • 603 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    solution to this question, Mircea Eliade’s theory as a whole most convincingly addresses this question compared other separate theories as a whole. In particular, Eliade’s emphasis of studying religion via a cross-cultural comparison method and his notion of “the sacred and the profane” results in a deeper understanding of a given religion and the function it provides to human society as a whole. In contrast to many of the earlier theorists such as Tylor, Frazer, and Freud; Eliade suggests that to truly

    • 712 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays